Jennifer Shutt

Podcast: Defense, Domestic Budget Increases Crucial for Long-Term Spending Deal
Budget Tracker Extra, Episode 41

CQ appropriations reporters Kellie Mejdrich and Jennifer Shutt discuss the two-week spending bill that averted a government shutdown and look at how lawmakers may keep the government funded beyond Dec. 22.

No Deal For Trump With ‘Chuck and Nancy’ This Time
‘We agreed to keep on talking,’ McConnell says

“Chuck and Nancy” finally went to the White House on Thursday. But there was no script-flipping deal to be had with President Donald Trump this time.

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., signaled the sides are still too far apart to close a deal, saying at the start of the meeting he was “glad we’re here to resume conversations.”

Senators Unclear on Plan to Fund Government Days Before Funding Expires
Republican senators say second continuing resolution into January possible

Trump, ‘Big Four’ Set to Meet Amid Shutdown Showdown
Huddle on year-end spending comes after last week's misfire

More than two months into the fiscal year and with just days left before a temporary spending bill expires, congressional leaders and President Donald Trump are scheduled to sit down Thursday to discuss key spending issues.

The meeting comes a little more than a week after the two Democratic leaders, Charles E. Schumer in the Senate and Nancy Pelosi in the House, opted to skip a meeting on the same topic, after Trump tweeted that he didn’t see a deal happening. And it will occur a little more than a day before the current continuing resolution funding the government expires at the end of Dec. 8. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and House Speaker Paul D. Ryan went ahead without them to the White House last week. 

Podcast: GOP’s Band-Aid Deal to Avert a Shutdown
Budget Tracker Extra, Episode 40

CQ budget reporter Jennifer Shutt explains the continuing resolution to fund the government through Dec. 22 and a temporary funding fix for the Children's Health Insurance Program.

Show Notes:

Some in Congress Still Have a Taste for Pork
For a Republican majority searching for wins, there may be no better time to bring back earmarks

In the year since Speaker Paul D. Ryan blocked his party’s effort to revive earmarks, a lot hasn’t happened.

There’s been no repeal of Obamacare and no border wall approval. Plans to fund the government are struggling to lift off.

Uncertainty Surrounds Avoiding Shutdown Showdown
House GOP wants to vote on stopgap funding in two steps

House Republican leaders are pursuing a two-step strategy to avoiding a government shutdown, but might have difficulty rounding up votes in the caucus for that approach.

Leaders want to vote on stopgap funding in two steps — one continuing resolution keeping government agencies operating through Dec. 22, and then another probably running into January, Rep. Charlie Dent said Friday.

House Likely to Vote on Stopgap Funding Through Dec. 22
Bill would buy more time for negotiations as shutdown deadline approaches

House Republicans are preparing a stopgap spending bill that could fund the government through Dec. 22, according to two House GOP sources.

The House Republican Conference is expected to discuss the stopgap spending bill, or continuing resolution, during a meeting Friday morning, according to a senior House GOP aide.

Lankford Report Critiques Funds for Trolley, Dating Study
‘Clearly, this is cutting-edge research with shocking results’

The federal government has spent billions of dollars since 2015 on items such as a study of refugee services in Iceland, virtual reality puppets, and expired body armor for law enforcement personnel, according to Sen. James Lankford’s third annual “waste report” released Monday.

The Oklahoma Republican used the 86-page report to criticize a variety of departments and agencies for how they used their annual appropriations during the last three fiscal years. 

New $44 Billion Disaster Aid Request Paltry, Lawmakers Say
Extensive offsets could also prove controversial

In its third emergency aid request since August, the White House on Friday asked Congress to approve $44 billion for ongoing hurricane recovery efforts, a figure seen as insufficient on both sides of the aisle. 

At the same time, the White House asked lawmakers to consider a lengthy list of offsets, noting in a letter that the administration “believes it is prudent to offset new spending.”

Podcast: Trump Kneecapping Obamacare Adds to Year-End Spending Hurdles
Budget Tracker Extra, Episode 35

Health care, border wall funding and legislation for Dreamers and an assortment of other issues are piling up and likely to complicate efforts for a year-end spending deal to avert a partial government shutdown, says CQ Budget reporter Jennifer Shutt.

 

Thad Cochran, Still Ailing, Will Miss Senate Votes This Week
Urinary tract infection sidelines Mississippi Republican for extended time

Sen. Thad Cochran will not immediately return to Washington following a four-week absence, raising speculation about the 79-year-old Mississippi Republican’s ability to continue as Appropriations chairman during the remainder of the 115th Congress.

His absence could also have implications for the budget resolution vote this week, though debate was still on track as of Monday, even after Cochran’s office confirmed he would not be present.

Diane Black, Prepping Gubernatorial Bid, Takes Victory Lap
Tennessee Republican finally shepherded budget resolution through House last week

The first woman to chair the House Budget Committee finally shepherded the fiscal 2018 resolution through her chamber Oct. 5, a traditionally thankless task that she took on after President Donald Trump tapped the former chairman, Tom Price, to be secretary of Health and Human Services.

Rep. Diane Black is now preparing to hand in her gavel after 10 months on the job, so she can focus on her campaign to become Tennessee’s next Republican governor, she announced in early August.

House GOP Adopts Budget, One Step Closer to Tax Overhaul
Vote largely along party lines, with some Republican defections

The House adopted its fiscal 2018 budget resolution Thursday, five days after the fiscal year began Oct. 1.

The 219-206 vote, which moves Republicans one step closer to the reconciliation instructions they need to advance a tax bill through the Senate without Democratic support, was largely along party lines, although 18 Republicans defected and voted against the resolution. No Democrats voted for the GOP-drafted budget plan.

Budget Debate, Grievances Get Airing in Both Chambers

Floor action on the fiscal 2018 budget resolution — made possible by assuaging conservatives’ concerns over the emerging tax overhaul blueprint last week — officially got under way on Wednesday.

The House voted 232-188 to approve parameters for debate and moved on to formally debating the resolution. Once the House and Senate formally adopt a joint budget resolution, if they can get that far, the tax-writing committees will be able to produce filibuster-proof tax legislation through the fast-track reconciliation process.

RSC Budget Allows Conservatives to Lay Down Austere Marker
Alternative will likely not pass, but gives conservatives an outlet

House Republicans will get the chance Thursday to vote for an alternative budget blueprint that offers up more than $10 trillion in spending cuts over a decade. The plan would double the number proposed in the House Budget Committee-approved fiscal 2018 resolution, while balancing the budget in half the time.

The conservative Republican Study Committee has been given assurances its alternative will be ruled in order for a vote when GOP leaders bring the fiscal 2018 budget resolution to the floor, according to an RSC aide.

Podcast: The Path Ahead for the Budget Resolutions
Budget Tracker Extra, Episode 33

Both chambers are hoping to move on their respective budget resolutions that would pave the way for the much-ballyhooed tax overhaul, says CQ budget reporter Jennifer Shutt. But buried in the budget language is a provision aimed at opening an Alaska wildlife refuge to oil drilling, adds CQ energy reporter Jeremy Dillon.

Show Notes:

Inside the Senate’s Budget Resolution: What It Means and What’s Next
 

The 89-page document released Friday will make way for Senate Republicans to advance a tax overhaul bill — GOP leadership’s next goal for Congress to accomplish. CQ budget and appropriations reporter Jennifer Shutt explains what’s in it and why there’s a lot of work ahead for Congress and the White House to negotiate a spending deal. ...
Updated: Senate Budget Would Ease Path for $1.5 Trillion Tax Cut
Enzi plans a markup in committee next week

The Senate Budget Committee on Friday released its version of the fiscal 2018 budget resolution that, once adopted by Congress, will allow Republicans to advance a tax bill through the reconciliation process.

The 89-page draft resolution would allow the Senate Finance and House Ways and Means Committees to increase the deficit by $1.5 trillion during the next decade in order to advance a tax overhaul bill, and sends instructions to the Senate Energy and Natural Resources and House Natural Resources Committees to reduce the deficit by $1 billion during the 10-year budget window, seen as a vehicle potentially to open up a portion of Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas exploration. The House and Senate committees are supposed to turn in their recommendations to the Budget committees by Nov. 13.

Podcast: Lifting the Spending Caps
Budget Tracker Extra, Episode 31

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle would like to lift the spending limits established by law, says CQ budget reporter Jennifer Shutt, adding that it's just the latest budget issue to confront lawmakers along with passing a budget resolution and a tax overhaul.