Niels Lesniewski

Warren Responds to Trump’s ‘Pocahontas’ Nickname, Defends Family History
Massachusetts Democrat spoke about her family’s Oklahoma background

Sen. Elizabeth Warren spoke at the National Congress of American Indians on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Elizabeth Warren directly confronted Trump’s nickname for her Wednesday.

The president has a habit, on Twitter and elsewhere, of referring to the liberal senator as “Pocahontas.” It’s directed at Warren’s claim of Native American heritage in her family tree, among the campaign flashpoints when she first ran for Senate.

Short DACA Fix Would Be ‘Insufficient’ for Trump, White House Warns
Senate debate just beginning, coming on heels of court orders halting end of program

Heather Piña Ledezma, 6, attends a news conference in the Capitol in December 2014 with Democratic senators and families impacted by the DACA program. Heather’s mother, Madai, is from Mexico, but Heather was born in Annapolis. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senior White House officials on Wednesday warned lawmakers against turning to a possible fallback measure that would temporarily make legal a program that protects nearly 700,000 undocumented immigrants from deportation.

It appears a longshot that the House and Senate will both pass immigration overhaul bills that address the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program and reconcile differences ahead of a March 5 deadline for its termination. One option should Congress fail to act by that date would be a measure legalizing DACA temporarily as members keep trying to strike a broader deal.

Senate Intel Leaders Look for Better Security Before 2018 Primaries
DNI testifies about importance of public information on Russian election meddling

FBI Director Christopher Wray, left, shakes hands with Senate Intelligence Chairman Richard M. Burr before a Tuesday hearing. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Leaders of the Senate Intelligence Committee hope to make their findings public on improving election security before primary contests get underway.

That’s what panel Chairman Richard M. Burr, a North Carolina Republican, and Vice Chairman Mark Warner, a Virginia Democrat, said Tuesday in wrapping up the open portion of the annual hearing on “Worldwide Threats.”

FBI, White House Offer Different Timelines on Porter Clearance
FBI director testifies background check report was first completed in July

FBI Director Christopher Wray testified during the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on “World Wide Threats.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

FBI Director Christopher Wray has offered a different account from the White House of the timeline for the security clearance investigation of former Staff Secretary Rob Porter.

“I can’t get into the content of what was briefed,” Wray testified Tuesday at the Senate Intelligence Committee. “What I can tell you is that the FBI submitted a partial report on the investigation in question in March, and then a completed background investigation in late July. Soon thereafter we received request for follow-up inquiry, and we did the follow-up and provided that information in November.

Maryland Democrats Blast FBI HQ Plan
Cardin, Hoyer concerned about effort to put new FBI building at current location

Maryland lawmakers are criticizing the GSA and FBI plan to rebuild the J. Edgar Hoover FBI Building on its current site. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Trump administration’s proposal to keep the FBI headquarters adjacent to the president’s hotel complex in downtown D.C., has raised the ire of Maryland lawmakers.

“Throughout the Bush and Obama Administrations, the FBI and GSA repeatedly told Congress that the FBI needs a new, fully consolidated headquarters, going so far as to stress the need for selecting a new site because the existing location does not allow the FBI to consolidate the almost 11,000 headquarters employees into one facility,” House Minority Whip Steny H. Hoyer said in a statement

In Louisville, Schumer Talks Bipartisanship, ‘Brooklyn Bourbon’
Previews the Senate’s immigration debate this week

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer presents U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell with a bottle of bourbon at the University of Louisville’s McConnell Center. Schumer spoke at the event as part of the center’s Distinguished Speaker Series. (Bill Pugliano/Getty Images)

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer used a visit to Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s hometown Monday to set up this week’s freewheeling immigration debate back at the Capitol.

The Democrat from New York said the two-year budget agreement that the leaders hammered out last week — and got through the Senate in the wee hours of Friday morning — underscored the ability of the chamber to function under the leadership of the current duo.

Podcast: Trump Budget Could Conflict With Spending Plans
CQ Budget, Episode 48

Boxes containing the President Donald Trump’'s fiscal year 2019 budget request are unpacked by staff in the House Budget Committee hearing room on Monday morning. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Roll Call senior Senate reporter Niels Lesniewski and CQ appropriations reporter Jennifer Shutt preview the Trump administration’s fiscal 2019 budget request, which is being released just days after Congress passed a $153 billion increase to next year’s discretionary spending cap.

Show Notes:

Senators Prepare for Messaging and Uncertainty From Immigration Debate
‘You know it’s an election year?’

Demonstrators supporting the so-called DREAM Act will likely be back on the Capitol grounds this week, like this group from Jan. 16 in the Hart Building. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senators say they are ready for what Majority Leader Mitch McConnell plans to give them this week: a return to regular order.

But that does not mean it will be easy.

Trump Signs Spending Package, Ending Short Shutdown
Government funds dried up for second time under 45th president’s watch

Storm clouds pass over the dome of the U.S. Capitol building on Jan. 23, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated at 9:06 a.m. | President Donald Trump on Friday signed a six-week stopgap spending bill featuring a sweeping budget deal following a holdup in the Senate that sent ripples waves across the country and briefly shuttered the government. But he slammed Democrats for insisting it include “much waste.”

“Just signed bill,” Trump tweeted around 8:45 a.m.

Senate Passes Budget Deal With Shutdown Underway
Prospects for House action are less clear

Congress was in session late again into Friday as appropriations lapsed. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate passed the bipartisan budget agreement in the wee hours of Friday morning, with a brief government shutdown having already kicked in.

The 71-28 vote on the $320 billion package that would reopen the government through March 23 sends the measure to the House, where the prospects are believed to be more precarious. The House vote may not take place until some federal workers are already on their way to work Friday morning.