2015

Schock’s Attorneys Claim FBI Broke the Law
Former staffer helped the feds build corruption case against former congressman

Lawyers for former Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill., claim that his constitutional rights were violated when a former staffer worked as an informant for the FBI. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Disgraced former Rep. Aaron Schock’s legal team claims that a staffer working as an informant for the FBI broke the law.

The staffer provided emails, credit card receipts, and other documents that helped the feds make a case against Schock, Fox News reported,but Schock’s lawyers say this violated his constitutional right against unreasonable search and seizure.

Trump Said to Want Former Marine General for Homeland Security
John F. Kelly served as commander of the U.S. Southern Command

Retired Marine Corps Gen. John F. Kelly met with President-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower last week. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

President-elect Donald Trump is turning to another retired Marine Corps general, John F. Kelly, to head the Department of Homeland Security, according to media reports.

Trump has not yet formally offered the job to Kelly, who is traveling outside the country this week, according to a New York Times report that cites a person briefed on the decision.

GOP Readies Cuts to Federal Workforce Under Trump
Reductions part of long-sought civil service overhaul

Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz is readying a plan that would likely make big changes to federal workers’ generous retirement benefits (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

For years, Republicans in Congress have been eyeing an overhaul of the federal workforce — by reducing the number of workers and curtailing benefits and pay while making it easier to fire bad employees.

Now, with a president-elect who has promised to do much the same, 2017 could be the best time in recent memory to make sweeping changes affecting those who work for the bureaucracy.

Systemic Failures Cited in Deadly Smoke Incident on D.C. Metro Train
Agency sent passenger trains full of commuters into smoke-filled tunnel in 2015

A Silver Line Metro train pulls into Capitol South Metro station on Capitol Hill on Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Trains filled with rush-hour passengers were sent to investigate reports of smoke pouring from a Washington Metro subway car last year that killed a commuter inside a tunnel near one of the city's busiest stations, federal safety investigators concluded on Tuesday.  

The National Transportation Safety Board was sharply critical of the Washington-area transit agency's handling of the debacle in January 2015, the most serious in a string of mechanical, operational and managerial failures that have plagued the nation's second-busiest subway system.