2020

Irony Alert: Trump Shares PSA Warning Against Spreading ‘False Information’
President attacks John Kerry Thursday night, starts Friday with string of hurricane warnings

President Trump is briefed earlier this week in the Oval Office as Hurricane Florence was poised to hammer the Carolinas. (White House photo via Flickr)

ANALYSIS — President Donald Trump, just one day after even Republicans criticized him for claiming nearly 3,000 people did not die last year in Puerto Rico due to two powerful hurricanes, shared a FEMA tweet warning against spreading false information.

Trump ended Thursday evening — as Hurricane Florence began bearing down on the North Carolina coast — by slamming former Secretary of State John Kerry, the longtime senator and failed 2004 Democratic presidential nominee who might be eyeing a 2020 run. He started Friday — with Florence dumping rainfall measured in feet as it made landfall in Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina — with a series of tweets urging people in the storm’s path to take steps to remain safe.

Trump Waffles on Pledge to Avoid Government Shutdown
He says Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity say it would be ‘greatest thing’

Supporters of President Donald Trump rally for the his immigration and border policies during his visit to see border wall prototypes on March 13. (David McNew/Getty Images)

Just hours after saying he had assured congressional leaders he would not shut down the federal government in a few weeks, President Donald Trump — citing conservative radio and television hosts — on Friday said he sees it as good politics for Republicans.

Trump told Fox News in an interview taped Thursday night before a campaign rally in Billings, Montana, that aired Friday morning that he was — at least in that moment — inclined to shut the government down after Sept. 30 if he doesn’t get his way, but added: “I don’t want to do anything that will hurt us, or potentially hurt us.”

Kamala Harris, Brett Kavanaugh and ‘Racial Dog Whistles’
Potential 2020 presidential candidate found nominee’s answer ‘very troubling’

Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., attends the Senate Judiciary confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. She has accused the nominee of using racial “dog whistles.” (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Kamala Harris, a potential 2020 Democratic presidential candidate, said Friday she was not satisfied with Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s answers this week when she asked him about his use of a term she dubbed a racial “dog whistle.”

During a Senate Judiciary confirmation session Friday with legal experts and other witnesses, the California Democrat returned to a line of questioning she had with the federal appellate judge on Wednesday. During the first full day of questioning Kavanaugh, she asked him to explain why he, in an op-ed, once used the term “racial spoils system.”

Former McCain Chief of Staff Considers Running for Senate As a Democrat
Rep. Ruben Gallego says he’ll decide after the midterms whether he’ll run

Grant Woods and his wife, Marlene, pay respect to the late Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., as the senator lies in state in the Capitol rotunda on August 31, 2018. Woods served for a time as McCain's chief of staff. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The late Sen. John McCain’s former chief of staff is considering running for his former boss’ seat as a Democrat.

Grant Woods served as the attorney general for Arizona from 1991 to 1999 and was a chief of staff for McCain when he was a congressman in the 1980s.

3 Takeaways From Brett Kavanaugh’s Testimony
Americans ‘rightly’ will have ‘dimmer view of the Senate,’ Graham says

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies Wednesday before members of the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS — Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh spent two days jousting with Senate Democrats over his views on executive power and abortion rights. But he appeared mindful that his top job was to keep all 51 Republican senators firmly in his corner.

Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee rarely flustered the 12-year veteran of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, and by midday Thursday several complimented his knowledge of the law and character. Republican Judiciary members began Thursday in a huddle called by Chairman Charles E. Grassley and spent the second day of questioning refuting Democrats’ criticisms of the nominee and defending him.

What If Senators Actually Tried to Expel Cory Booker?
To start, it would be a case for the Ethics Committee

Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, responds to a threat by Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., to release committee confidential documents during the start of day three of Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court confirmation hearing Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The threat of expulsion that hung over the Judiciary Committee on Thursday jolted the proceedings, but it is highly unlikely that Cory Booker — or any other lawmaker — is actually going to be expelled from the Senate for the unauthorized disclosure of documents about Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Booker dared Majority Whip John Cornyn to try to expel him Thursday, when he announced he had ordered his staff to release “committee confidential” documents relating to the New Jersey Democrat’s line of questioning at the Kavanaugh hearings.

Cory Booker Has a Performative Streak
New Jersey Democrat has put on a show since he was a city councilman in Newark

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., threatens to release committee confidential documents during the start of Day 3 of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation hearing on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Cory Booker amped up the drama around Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearings Thursday when he passionately defended his decision to release confidential documents about the judge’s record.

Booker said he understood the consequences could be expulsion from the Senate.

Booker Orders Release of Kavanaugh-Related Email in ‘Act of Disobedience’
Sen. Booker dares Sen. Cornyn to start process to remove him from Senate

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., made a splash Thursday during the third day of Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination hearing. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The third day of Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court confirmation hearing began with fireworks: A senator dared another to try to kick him out of the Senate.

Potential 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Cory Booker of New Jersey and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn of Texas jousted at the Thursday session’s start over the process by which the Judiciary Committee, National Archives, Justice Department and former President George W. Bush’s legal staff have been reviewing and clearing or withholding documents from Kavanaugh’s time working for the 43rd president.

Harris Lands First Blow on Kavanaugh — But It Only Grazes Him
Senator accuses nominee of remembering conversation but not wanting 'to tell us'

From left: Sens. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., Kamala Harris, D-Calif., and Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., confer during the Senate Judiciary Committee's confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 11:14 a.m. | ANALYSIS — It took almost 12 hours Wednesday before a Democratic senator, Kamala Harris of California, landed more than a glancing blow on the Teflon chin of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. And even then, she wasn’t able to put President Donald Trump’s second high court pick on the canvas.

The late-night exchange lasted nearly 10 minutes, left Kavanaugh with a dumbfounded facial expression several times, and led Utah Republican Sen. Mike Lee to break in with a helping hand.

Big Sky Trip Highlights Trump’s Focus on Senate Races
President also involved in gubernatorial races, Pence takes House contests

President Donald Trump at the White House in July. He will spend part of Thursday and Friday in Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota campaigning and raising funds for GOP Senate and gubernatorial candidates. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Donald Trump will return to Montana on Thursday night for another political rally aimed at ousting incumbent Democrat Jon Tester, part of the president’s midterm focus on keeping the Senate under Republican control.

White House and Trump campaign officials have signaled Trump will hit as many as eight states this month alone before picking up the pace in October as the midterm campaign enters its final sprint. Trump will continue to publicly stump for Republican Senate and gubernatorial incumbents and candidates, while Vice President Mike Pence primarily focuses on competitive House races.