agriculture

Buffeted by trade winds, soybean farmers seek tax credit renewal
Industry ‘would be wiped out‘ if tariffs on Argentine competitors were lifted, Rep. Kind says

Freshman Iowa Rep. Abby Finkenauer, center, is seeking to restore the biodiesel credit (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

One bright spot in an otherwise dreary outlook for U.S. soybean farmers, caught in the ongoing China trade war crossfire, has been the 1.5 gallons of biodiesel — a cleaner-burning alternative to traditional diesel motor fuel — that each bushel of soybeans yields.

Protected on one side by the EPA’s renewable fuels mandate and by steep import tariffs on the other, some biodiesel producers were able to post profits last year despite the lapse of the industry’s coveted $1 per gallon tax credit for the sale or use of the fuel.

Democrats join Trump in whining about tariffs on wine
Feinstein, others call on administration to push for removing duties on U.S. wine

Democratic lawmakers want the Trump administration to ensure any new trade agreements with China or Japan remove tariffs on U.S. wine. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Concerns about tariffs on wine are leaving a sour taste both on Capitol Hill and in the White House.

But this wine isn’t skunked, it’s tainted by retaliatory Chinese tariffs, lawmakers say.

Capitol Ink | Trade War Farmer

Trump blasts Federal Reserve, U.S. Chamber over trade, interest rates
President threatens to leave business organization in what appeared to be unplanned phone interview with CNBC

President Donald Trump speaks during a rally at the Williamsport Regional Airport in Montoursville, Pa., in May. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump blasted the Federal Reserve and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Monday morning in what appeared to be an unplanned telephone interview with CNBC.

Trump again criticized the Federal Reserve Board for having raised interest rates, especially while the president said China was allowing its currency to be weakened in part to mitigate the effects of U.S. tariffs.

US-Mexico tariff talks resume Friday as implementation looms Monday
House Ways and Means chairman says if Trump imposes tariffs, he’ll introduce resolution to repeal them

Democratic Rep. Richard Neal, chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, said he’ll introduce a resolution of disapproval to repeal President Donald Trump’s tariffs against Mexico if they go into effect on Monday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Mexico and the U.S. will continue talks Friday about efforts to curb the flow of Central American migrants to the southern U.S. border, Mexican Foreign Secretary Marcelo Ebrard said in a short statement late Thursday.

Mexico is trying to reach an agreement with the U.S. on migration in order to avoid a series of escalating tariffs President Donald Trump has threatened to impose on all Mexican imports. The first round of tariffs would begin Monday with a 5 percent duty on imports ranging from fruits to machinery.

Trump: ‘Something pretty dramatic’ could happen with Mexico as tariffs loom
POTUS to allies at D-Day anniversary event: ‘Our bond is unbreakable’

President Donald Trump throws a MAGA hat to the crowd during a rally at the Williamsport Regional Airport in Montoursville, Pa., in May. He has been critical and upbeat about talks with Mexico that could prevent his proposed tariffs. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump on Thursday breathed life into Republican members’ hopes that his administration might opt against imposing tariffs on goods entering the country from Mexico. And he also took a shot at Republican lawmakers who oppose the tariffs.

Mexican government officials met Wednesday at the White House with Vice President Mike Pence, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and other administration officials. The two sides are slated to meet again Thursday — though Pence is scheduled to travel to Virginia and Pennsylvania for D-Day anniversary and political events.

Dems pounce on GOP tariffs civil war and other takeaways from Trump‘s UK visit
Under Trump, U.S. is ‘standing around not doing much,’ former VP Biden says on trail

President Donald Trump inspects a honor guard at Buckingham Palace on Monday. He concluded a three-day state visit on Wednesday, making plenty of news along the way. (Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

ANALYSIS - President Donald Trump ended his U.K. visit Wednesday in an uncharacteristic manner, sitting silently before the television cameras during an unplanned meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. The moment offered a juxtaposition to his full-throated, unapologetic three days on British soil.

“The two leaders sat, smiling at the pool without saying a word,” wrote a reporter who was in Portsmouth, England, where the two leaders met briefly during a reception following a ceremony commemorating the 75th anniversary of World War II’s D-Day invasion.

Trump backtracks from comment that U.K. health service would be part of trade talks
Outgoing PM May on Tuesday appeared to leave wiggle room in nascent negotiations

British Prime Minister Theresa May, President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump pose outside 10 Downing Street on Tuesday. Trump backtracked from a pledge that the U.K.'s National Health Service would be part of trade deal talks. (Peter Summers/Getty Images)

Attempting to keep hopes of a sweeping U.S.-U.K. trade pact alive, President Donald Trump reversed himself by taking Britain’s National Health Service off the table.

I don't see it being on the table. Somebody asked me a question today and I say everything is up for negotiation, because everything is but I don't see that being,” the U.S. leader told “Good Morning Britain” on ITV in an interview that aired Wednesday morning. “That's something that I would not consider part of trade. That's not trade.”

Republican rebellion over Mexico tariffs overshadows Trump’s European visit
As D-Day ceremonies begin, GOP members send a rare warning to the president

House Ways and Means ranking member Kevin Brady and other Republicans broke Tuesday with President Donald Trump on his planned tariffs on goods entering the country from Mexico. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump’s latest tariff war sparked a rare rebellion by Republican lawmakers on Tuesday, stealing the spotlight from his state visit to the United Kingdom and threatening to intrude on the ceremonies marking the 75th anniversary of the D-Day invasion in Normandy, France.

“On the proposed Mexico tariffs, look, there is a window here,” House Ways and Means ranking member Kevin Brady said Tuesday of escalating tensions over the tariff threat. “Negotiations, and what I’ve heard constructive negotiations, are occurring as we speak with Mexico representatives in Washington right now.”

White House brushes off Grassley, GOP concern over Mexico tariffs
'Trade policy and border security are separate issues,' Senate Finance chair warns

Then-Rep. Mick Mulvaney, R-S.C., second from right, before his Senate Budget Committee confirmation hearing in  January 2017. He's now acting White House chief of staff and leading a new tariff spat with Mexico. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After abruptly announcing tariffs on imports coming from Mexico over a migrant dispute, the White House is brushing aside the concerns of powerful Republican lawmakers - including Senate Finance Chairman Charles E. Grassley.

President Donald Trump green-lighted the import fees in an attempt to push the Mexican government to clamp down on the flow of Central and South American migrants moving through its territory toward the U.S.-Mexico border.