campaigns

Reps. Crenshaw, Gallagher, Waltz urge more GOP veterans to run for Congress
Republicans cite Democratic successes in 2018 midterms, and seek to recruit more veteran GOP candidates

Rep. Dan Crenshaw, R-Texas, and two other Republican House members are making a push to elect more GOP military veterans to Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Three Republican congressmen who served in the military are relaunching a PAC to help recruit more GOP veterans like themselves to run for Congress.

Reps. Dan Crenshaw of Texas, Mike Gallagher of Wisconsin and Michael Waltz of Florida announced Wednesday they are forming the War Veterans Fund PAC this cycle, which aims to recruit Republican veterans of U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to run in their home districts and assist them with funding.

These Democratic women don’t want to be ‘show ponies’
Political Theater: Episode 73

Democratic House freshmen banding together to help each other raise money to keep their seats in 2020 are, from left, Reps. Mikie Sherrill, Abigail Spanberger, Elissa Slotkin, and Chrissy Houlahan, along with Rep. Elaine Luria. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Five Democratic freshmen, all women with military or intelligence backgrounds, are banding together to help each other fundraise for their 2020 races. They all flipped Republican districts in 2018, and they know winning districts like theirs is the key to holding and expanding the House majority in 2020. 

After a few months in Congress, they’ve figured out who are the “workhorses” and who are the “show ponies,” in the words of Michigan Rep. Elissa Slotkin, and they’re tired of the latter getting all the attention. Along with Slotkin, Reps. Elaine Luria and Abigail Spanberger of Virginia, Mikie Sherrill of New Jersey and Chrissy Houlahan of Pennsylvania are fighting to hold the majority.

Steve Bullock announces presidential run
Montana governor touts record of winning in a Trump state and taking on dark campaign money

Montana Democratic Gov. Steve Bullock won re-election in 2016 while Donald Trump was winning his state in a landslide. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock became the 22nd major Democratic candidate for president when he announced his entry into the race on Tuesday.

The two-term governor, who won re-election in 2016 while Donald Trump was winning the state by 20 points, made his announcement in a video that touted his electability and promised to take dark money out of politics.

Iowans prep for fierce 2020 fight — and not just for the White House
All four House districts will be contested, in addition to competitive Senate race

Iowa Democratic Rep. Cindy Axne is a top Republican target in 2020. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Iowans are used to the spotlight in presidential election years, and with the number of Democrats eyeing the nomination approaching two dozen, it may be difficult this year to travel in the state without running into a candidate or the media entourage that comes with them.

But for Iowa voters, the more intense political battles in 2020 might actually be further down the ballot.

Graham, Klobuchar introduce internet ads bill to boost transparency
The bill would treat internet and social media campaign ads like current political ads on radio, TV and print

Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., looks over papers before the start of the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the "Department of Justice’s Investigation of Russian Interference with the 2016 Presidential Election" on Wednesday, May 1, 2019. Attorney General Bill Barr testified during the hearing. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A bipartisan bill to boost the transparency of political and campaign ads posted on social media and the internet is expected to be reintroduced Wednesday by Sens. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., and Mark Warner, D-Va.

The bill, first introduced in the 115th Congress, would treat internet and social media campaign ads like current political ads on radio, television and in print, which have to disclose publicly who paid for them.

McConnell already raising money after declaring ‘case closed’ on Mueller report
Message to Trump supporters: ‘Donate if you agree!’

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, left, declared the Mueller report a “case closed” on Tuesday, especially with respect to any collusion with Russia by President Donald Trump’s campaign. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell came to the Senate floor Tuesday to declare “case closed” on alleged Trump campaign conspiracy with Russia, his 2020 re-election effort quickly started raising money.

“Mitch just told the Democrats to end their Russia conspiracy spectacle and accept there was no collusion. CASE CLOSED,” read a Tuesday morning fundraising message from the Kentucky Republican’s campaign.

Ex-Rep. Scott Taylor threatens Virginia Democrats over election fraud allegations
Former congressman who lost re-election bid claims ‘complete vindication’ after staffer indicted

Former Rep. Scott Taylor, R-Va., was caught up in a controversy before the 2018 midterm elections over allegations of his campaign staff forging signatures on ballot petition sheets. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Rep. Scott Taylor is considering a defamation lawsuit against the Democratic Party of Virginia for “slandering, smearing, and lying” about his role in an alleged election fraud scheme during his failed 2018 re-election bid.

The one-term Virginia Republican claimed “complete vindication” after Virginia special prosecutor Don Caldwell, who is investigating election fraud claims against members of Taylor’s former campaign staff, released an update Monday saying he indicted one former Taylor staffer for election fraud but found no evidence — so far — that Taylor directed any illegal activity. Other indictments could still be forthcoming, Caldwell indicated.

Bill cracking down on LLCs used for tax evasion and money laundering faces obstacles
The bill would require corporations and limited liability companies to tell the Treasury who really owns them

Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., arrives for the House Democrats' caucus meeting in the Capitol on Feb. 26, 2019. She is expected to introduce a bill that would require corporations and limited liability companies to tell the Treasury Department who really owns them. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After bouncing around Congress for over a decade, a bill to crack down on anonymous shell companies used in money laundering and tax evasion may advance this year, having attracted support from some strange bedfellows, including banks, unions, the national security community, human rights advocates, environmentalists, multinational corporations, law enforcement and the Trump administration.

Democratic Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney is expected to introduce the bill with her fellow New Yorker, Republican Rep. Peter T. King, as Congress returns from recess, and it could go to markup as soon as May 8.

Mark Kelly’s fundraising highlights limits of ‘no corporate PAC’ pledge
Campaign accepted thousands from corporate CEOs, presidents and lobbyists

Democrat Mark Kelly is running for Senate in Arizona. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When he launched his campaign for Senate, Arizona Democrat and former astronaut Mark Kelly said corporate money “poisons our democracy” and he would not accept corporate PAC contributions.

But Kelly’s campaign accepted thousands of dollars from business executives and lobbyists during the first three months of the year, raising questions about how “no corporate PAC” pledge candidates can actually separate themselves from special interests.

Think 20 presidential candidates is a lot? Try 300-plus
A simple federal form is all it takes to be an ‘official’ candidate, but getting noticed is harder

The large field of Republican presidential candidates in the 2016 cycle led Fox Business Network, based on poll ratings, to decide that Mike Huckabee, Carly Fiorina and Rick Santorum would participate in their own debate, separately from the top seven candidates in the race. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images file photo)

More than 300 citizens since January have filed paperwork with the Federal Election Commission to run for president of the United States.

The full list features candidates from dozens of states, with multiple political affiliations.