centrist-politics

Opinion Duel: CQ Roll Call Moderates Debate on Raising the Minimum Wage

In the third installment of The Purple Network’s “Opinion Duel,” Roll Call Editor-in-Chief Christina Bellantoni moderated a discussion with Charles C. W. Cooke , from National Review and The Nation ’s Zoë Carpenter over the politically charged topic of increasing the minimum wage.  

Carpenter contended that "even Republicans in the South" want the minimum wage raised to $10.10 an hour, but said that hike might not be enough. "There's a lot of momentum" for legislative action, Carpenter said. Cooke took issue with the idea that raising the minimum wage would "lift people out of poverty" saying that most who currently make minimum wage are not below the poverty line. "When you're looking at how to help people in need," Cooke said, minimum wage is "often not the best way to do it."  

Opinion Duel: CQ Roll Call Moderates Debate on Climate Change

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In the second installment of The Purple Network's "Opinion Duel," Roll Call Editor-in-Chief Christina Bellantoni moderated a discussion with Charles C. W. Cooke, from National Review and The Nation's Zoë Carpenter over the widely debated topic of climate change. Carpenter and Cooke discussed whether anything is being done to address climate issues and how this debate has shifted the political landscape. They also detailed the industry's "big money" in politics and how it sways popular opinion.  

Opinion Duel: CQ Roll Call Moderates Debate on Keystone XL (Video)

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CQ Roll Call is excited to offer the first installment of a new video series, "Opinion Duel," created by The Purple Network. Roll Call has partnered with National Review and The Nation to bring you in-depth discussions of top political issues with more discussion than a short cable news segment. Representing the left, right, and center, each Opinion Duel program will feature an intelligent debate on key legislative issues between The Nation on the left, National Review on the right, and CQ Roll Call editors playing the important role of moderator.  

In this first installment of the Opinion Duel, Roll Call's Editor-in-Chief Christina Bellantoni moderated a discussion with Charles C. W. Cooke , from National Review and The Nation 's Zoë Carpenter . Carpenter and Cooke discussed the interests surrounding the Keystone XL pipeline and whether President Obama has been active on the climate change agenda. Bellantoni lead the discussion with questions that allowed Cooke and Carpenter to offer differing sides of the political spectrum concerning the Keystone XL pipeline and the administration's current delay of any resolution to the hot-button issue.  

Ideology Isn't Source of All Partisanship | Procedural Politics

Why do political parties in Congress sometimes fight, even when they agree? Is it like siblings who seem to quarrel over nothing — just the nature of the beast?

Frances Lee, a political scientist at the University of Maryland, agrees that a lot of the inter-party fighting seems senseless because it doesn't involve deep philosophical differences. In her book, “Beyond Ideology: Politics, Principles and Partisanship in the U.S. Senate,” Lee writes, “The public perceives party conflict in Congress as ‘bickering,’ as excessive quarreling driven by members’ power and electoral interests.”

Averting Calamity Comes Down to Boehner's Leadership Skills

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The health of the U.S. economy depends on the legislative skill — and the courage — of Speaker John A. Boehner, R-Ohio.

It’s up to him to prevent a shutdown of the U.S. government at the end of this month and, a little later, the first-ever default on the national debt.

Hate Congress? Blame the (Sharply Divided) Voters

An increasingly popular talking point for Democrats is that Republicans are responsible for the bickering, dysfunction and looming budget crises on Capitol Hill.

On its GrandObstructionParty.com Web page, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee declares: “This Republican Congress is broken — too focused on obstruction and scoring points against President Obama.”

Neither Supply-Siders Nor Keynesians Have the Answer for This Economic Crisis

Give President Barack Obama credit for at least trying to diagnose and grapple with the economic crises of our era — slow growth, widening income inequality and diminished upward mobility.

The deeper dilemma for him and the country is that his proposed solutions — largely, government stimuli of various sorts — aren’t working and might be inadequate to counter the huge forces at play: globalization, technological change and deterioration of social capital.

GOP Faces 20 Years in Desert Without DLC-Like Moderation

In 1972, as left-liberals led the Democratic Party to a near-unbroken 20-year run of presidential-election disasters, the late, great New York Times columnist William Safire wrote that “nothing is more certain in politics than the crushing defeat of a faction that holds ideological purity to be of greater value than compromise.”

Safire’s comment was cited this March in a trenchant Commentary article by former White House aides Michael Gerson and Peter Wehner, “How to Save the Republican Party.”

A Deal on Immigration Is Still Possible, if Both Sides Back Off

The chances passing a sensible immigration bill in this Congress appear to be next to zero. But, as with the endless search for Middle East peace, it’s a cause worth pursuing. And, conceivably, there’s a deal to be had.

The Senate’s comprehensive bill is a monstrosity compared to what an ideal bill would look like, especially calling for spending nearly $50 billion militarizing our border with Mexico to secure the votes of a measly 14 GOP senators.

Supreme Court Has Done Its Job — and No More

Like it or not — and lots of people on the right and left don’t like it — the Supreme Court bumped the country into the 21st century with its affirmative action, voting rights and gay marriage decisions.

Conservatives detest the court’s moving the country toward “marriage equality” for same-sex couples and liberals condemn it for ending federal supervision of voting laws in the South and limiting racial preferences in university admissions.