civil-rights

Transgender Woman Said Lujan Grisham’s Office Discriminated Against Her
Says she was fired from her internship when it was learned she was transgender

A former intern said Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham, D-N.M., fired her for being transgender. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A former intern said she was fired from New Mexico Democratic Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham’s office for being transgender.

Riley Del Rey told the Santa Fe New Mexican she was fired from the Democrat’s office almost three years ago and is speaking now because she has seen a number of stories about sexual harassment but transgender voices are missing.

Trump’s Tweets Again Spark Courtroom Questions on Travel Ban
“Do we just ignore reality?” one judge asked

President Donald Trump’s anti-Muslim tweets came up in court Friday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump retweeted three anti-Muslim videos last week, just as two appeals courts prepared to hear arguments on challenges to the latest version of his travel ban. 

The tweets were bound to come up in court — and they did in a big way Friday, when the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit grilled a Justice Department attorney on whether the tweets taint the restrictions on immigration from eight countries, including six that are majority-Muslim. 

Conyers’ Downfall Was Richmond’s ‘Most Trying Moment’
‘You want to hold out hope that he did not do these awful things,’ Congressional Black Caucus chairman says

Rep. Cedric Richmond, D-La., walks down the House steps following a vote in the Capitol on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Congressional Black Caucus Chairman Rep. Cedric Richmond called the downfall of Rep. John Conyers one of the most difficult moments in Richmond’s time leading the caucus.

Conyers announced his resignation effective immediately on Tuesday amid reports he sexually harassed multiple women. The Michigan Democrat also said he endorsed his son to run for his seat.

Lawmakers Add to the Mix in Same-Sex Wedding Cake Case
Oral arguments before the Supreme Court scheduled Tuesday

Sen. Ted Cruz wrote in a brief filed with the Supreme Court that a case involving a baker who declined to bake a cake for a same-sex wedding “goes beyond a cake.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawmakers weighed in on the legal issues before the Supreme Court’s oral arguments Tuesday about whether a Colorado baker who calls himself an artist can decline to bake a cake for a same-sex wedding.

As Republican lawmakers led by Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas said in a brief filed with the court, “This case, of course, goes beyond a cake.”

Trump on Course for Least Diverse Judicial Picks Since Reagan
President’s nominees have been overwhelmingly white and male

Greg Katsas was nominated by President Donald Trump for a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. He is seen here during his confirmation hearing last month. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump’s picks for federal judgeships reflect a strikingly different direction when it comes to diversity on the bench — it is the most white and male group of nominees in recent history.

So far, 91 percent of Trump’s 58 judicial nominees for district and appeals courts are white, a pace that would make his appointees the least diverse since the Reagan administration, according to statistics compiled by the liberal advocacy group Alliance for Justice. Only 19 percent of his picks are women, a pace that would make his appointees the most male since the George H.W. Bush administration.

Opinion: Did Everyone in the White House Take a Nap During History Class?
White House Chief of Staff John Kelly wrong to repeat “Lost Cause” mythology

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly was on the wrong side of the facts when he repeated the Confederate “Lost Cause” mythology, Mary C. Curtis writes. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

In forward-looking America, history is sometimes regarded as a roadblock to progress, a nuisance. And that, as has been repeatedly proven, is a mistake.

Why look back when the future is so important? Well, because failure to do exactly that has consequences.

Senators Ready to Confront Sessions at Oversight Hearing
Attorney General likely to face contentious questions about his leadership

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is scheduled to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

Attorney General Jeff Sessions returns to face his former Senate Judiciary Committee colleagues Wednesday in an oversight hearing likely to include contentious questions about Justice Department actions since he took on the role eight months ago.

“The attorney general will earn his money that day,” said committee member John Kennedy, a Louisiana Republican.

Ai Weiwei Brings Politics, Humanity to ‘Human Flow’
Movie about refugees gets Republican and Democratic lawmakers to agree on something

Ai Weiwei’s film “Human Flow” traverses the globe to examine the refugee crisis. (Courtesy “Human Flow”)

Politics is seldom far removed from Ai Weiwei’s art, whether it comes in the form of a memorial to his dissident father, an iconic Olympics stadium in Beijing, Lego portraits of political prisoners or, in his latest venture, a documentary about refugees, “Human Flow.”

Aside from the accomplishment of shooting a movie in extremely dangerous locations across the globe about extremely desperate people, the artist has now been able to do that rarest of things for Washington: get a Republican and Democrat in the same room to agree on something.

Lawmakers Join the Battle Over NFL Protests
Some Republicans are boycotting the league, while some Democrats laud it

Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, in jacket, and head coach Jason Garrett, right, kneel with their team in a show of solidarity before the national anthem during a game against the Arizona Cardinals on Monday. (James D. Smith via AP)

 

Republican and Democratic lawmakers have joined the battle for patriotic superiority that heated up in NFL stadiums over the weekend.

Pelosi Calls Out Trump for War on NFL, NBA
Sports are ‘where we put our differences aside,’ minority leader says

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said President Donald Trump should have used the controversy surrounding NFL national anthem protests as an opportunity to "bring people together.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

As President Donald Trump uninvited the NBA champion Golden State Warriors from their White House visit and called any NFL player who kneels during the national anthem before games a “son of a bitch” over the weekend, Rep. Nancy Pelosi struck a different tone about the interplay between sports and politics.

“I have always said sports and the arts will bring America together,” the House minority leader said Sunday on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “It’s where we put our differences aside.”