congressional-operations

Rep. Gwen Moore Asks for Protection for Pages if Roy Moore Is Elected
Wisconsin Democrat cites allegations against Alabama Senate candidate

Wisconsin Rep. Gwen Moore has questions about safeguards to protect Senate pages from the “predatory conduct of U.S. Senators and Senate staff.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Gwen Moore is asking the Senate sergeant-at-arms and doorkeeper to be proactive in protecting pages if Republican Roy Moore wins Alabama’s special Senate election on Tuesday.

In a letter, the Wisconsin Democrat asked what preventive steps are being taken to “safeguard Senate Pages from predatory conduct of U.S. Senators and Senate staff.”

Want to Know Who Else Has Been Accused of Sexual Harassment in Congress? Good Luck
Congressional offices can’t release basic details of complaints — even to lawmakers

Virginia Rep. Barbara Comstock says Congress must “fundamentally change” how sexual harassment complaints are handled. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The details of sexual harassment complaints against members of Congress and their staffs are secret and cannot be released to lawmakers seeking to determine the extent of the problem on Capitol Hill, a congressional official testified Thursday. 

“The law doesn’t allow us to release anything,” said Susan Tsui Grundmann, the executive director of the Office of Compliance, which oversees the response to sexual harassment complaints in Congress. She told a hearing of the House Administrative Committee that if lawmakers want to know more — including the number of complaints filed and the names of the accused — they will have to change the law. 

The Unkindest Cut: How to Pay for Tax Overhaul Sweeteners
Hundreds of billions of dollars needed to pay for sought-after changes

Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady is among the top negotiators in the House-Senate conference committee on the GOP’s tax overhaul. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As the House and Senate prepare for a conference committee on the Republican tax overhaul, the two chambers face the challenge of reconciling stark differences, and where to find billions of dollars they may need to smooth things over. 

Among the most significant discrepancies are the treatments of pass-through businesses, the estate tax and the corporate alternative minimum tax. House Republicans are also considering a provision to further scale back the proposed trimming of the state and local tax deduction.

Senate GOP Keeps Working for Tax Overhaul Votes

Sen. Steve Daines, R-Mont., speaks during a news conference in the Capitol on Nov. 7 on the Tepublican tax overhaul bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn on Friday said the GOP has the votes to pass a tax overhaul, but added they were still working to bring Sens. Jeff Flake of Arizona and Bob Corker of Tennessee onboard.

“We haven’t given up,” the Texas Republican said. His comments indicate the GOP has 50 votes, and can call in Vice President Mike Pence to break a tie, but would prefer to get all 52 Republicans on board. 

Capitol Ink | Workplace Training Exercise

Brady Clear of Most Damaging Charges After Statute of Limitations Expires
Philly Dem could still face some charges stemming from corruption case

Rep. Robert Brady, D-Pa., dodged a major legal setback Monday after the statute of limitations expired on some charges that could have been brought against him. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Robert A. Brady’s political lifeline received a jolt Monday after the statute of limitations expired on many of the charges he could have faced for a 2012 payoff case.

In recent months, two Brady aides and a former political rival were handed down indictments stemming from the case.

Trump’s Tweet Could Raise Odds of Government Shutdown
President aims to lessen Democrats’ leverage in year-end talks

President Donald Trump makes a brief statement to the media as Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., left, and White House Chief of Staff John Kelly, right, look on, after a meeting with the House Republican Conference in the Capitol to discuss the GOP’s tax reform bill earlier this month. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 1:02 p.m. | President Donald Trump raised the odds of a government shutdown next month, tweeting that his differences with Democratic leaders over immigration policy could prevent a deal on a year-end spending package.

The president noted that he was scheduled to meet Tuesday afternoon with “‘Chuck and Nancy’ ... about keeping government open and working.” He was referring to House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Charles E. Schumer. Also set to attend the White House meeting were House Speaker Paul D. Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

‘Pass-Through’ Changes Dog Senate GOP Tax Overhaul
Republican Ron Johson says plan not generous enough to pass-throughs

From left, Michigan Sen. Debbie Stabenow, Senate Finance ranking member Ron Wyden, Senate Finance Chairman Orrin G. Hatch and Iowa Sen. Charles E. Grassley participate in the committee markup of the Senate GOP’s tax bill Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Trouble signs emerged Wednesday for the Republican tax overhaul effort, even as the Senate Finance Committee crept closer — slowly, and sometimes painfully — toward approving its bill later this week.

The top tax writers on each side forecast long hours still ahead. “Tomorrow, we are going to be here a while,” Sen. Ron Wyden, the Finance panel’s ranking member, said Wednesday.

Speier Says Congress Paid $15 Million for Harassment Settlements
Speier and Gillibrand to introduce legislation to deal with ‘an antiquated process’

Rep. Jackie Speier, D-Calif., said that she couldn’t name names, citing non-disclosure agreements. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Jackie Speier said Tuesday that the House of Representatives has paid out more than $15 million over the last decade to settle harassment cases, though that number also includes discrimination claims.

Speier made the assertion on “Meet the Press Daily” after testifying in Congress about sexual harassment on Capitol Hill. 

Opinion: For the Republicans, Less Is (Roy) Moore
McConnell said it: Every day is a Maalox moment for the GOP

Republican senators started to abandon Alabama Senate GOP nominee Roy Moore after The Washington Post published allegations of sexual misconduct with underage women. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The implosion of the Senate candidacy of Roy Moore brings to mind the title of an early Spike Lee movie: “Do the Right Thing.”

After Moore romped home in the Alabama Senate primary runoff in late September, the national Republican Party could have shunned him for many valid reasons. There was Moore’s un-American belief that Muslims should not be allowed to serve in Congress; his wackadoodle claim that Sharia law governed communities in Indiana and Illinois; and his defiance of the law that twice led to his removal from Alabama’s Supreme Court.