congressional-staffers

Anti-Hacking 18-Wheeler Parks Near the Capitol
Congressional aides got some advice from IBM experts ahead of the midterms

The IBM C-TOC training room seats 20 staffers and was standing room only during the training on Thursday. (Alex Gangitano/ Roll Call)

Congressional staffers naively joined a public Wi-Fi network as they settled in for an hour-long cybersecurity training. Little did they know that any websites they browsed on their phones were about to flash on a giant screen.

There was nothing too embarrassing. At least one person was killing time on ESPN.com.

House GOP Incumbents Spent Hundreds of Thousands in Legal Fees to Head Off Crises
Mia Love, Scott Taylor, Chris Collins and Duncan Hunter all face competitive races

Rep. David Schweikert, R-Ariz., spent nearly $185,000 in campaign money on legal fees in the third quarter that ended Sept. 30. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

At least six House Republicans combined to spend more than $325,000 in campaign funds in the most recent quarter alone on legal or crisis management fees related to brewing scandals that have wended their way into the court of public opinion — and, in some cases, real courtrooms.

New York Rep. Chris Collins, whom federal authorities indicted on Aug. 8 on 10 counts related to insider trading and securities fraud, shelled out $30,980.25 from his campaign account to the D.C.-based law firm BakerHostetler just three days later.

Stanley Cup Finally Gets Its D.C. Day in the Capitol
Washington hockey fans make the most of their first ever NHL championship

A Capitol Police officer takes a selfie with the NHL's Stanley Cup in the Capitol on Wednesday. The Cup, which was won by the Washington Capitals in June, made a few stops on the Hill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

When the Stanley Cup was in the Capitol, true Washington Capitals fans stood apart from other hockey fans taking a quick break from their jobs during a recess day to see the famous trophy.

Many were wearing their allegiance on their chest.

Remembering Tim Johnson: Congressional Baseball Game Was the ‘Love of His Life’
Former Oxley staffer died at 59 years old

Rep. Joe Barton, R-Texas, center, sets the lineup during a scrimmage between Republican team members in 2016 with Rep. Mike Bishop, R-Mich., right, and coach Tim Johnson, left. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former staffer and Congressional Baseball Game staple Tim Johnson died Sunday after a decade-long battle with multiple myeloma.

He died at his sister’s house in Leola, Pennsylvania, at 59 years old. He had just celebrated his birthday Oct. 3.

Want to Build a More Diverse Capitol Hill? Start With the Staff
Congress has a diversity problem, and I had a front-row view

If we’re going to grow the pool of diverse candidates for Hill jobs, we have to start by directly addressing the barriers that young people of color might face, Perez writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — Diversity is a driving force behind a changing America: People of color now represent almost 40 percent of the U.S. population. Yet somehow, a new Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies report shows that they make up merely 13.7 percent of senior staffers in the U.S. House of Representatives.

That means our elected officials’ legislative directors, communications directors, and chiefs of staff are overwhelmingly white, even in offices representing states with large Latino and African-American populations.

Court Documents Detail Doxxing of Senate Republicans
Jackson Cosko was reportedly confronted by staffers in Hassan’s office after he used a computer there

Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee Orrin Hatch, left, and Mike Lee are among those that Jackson A. Cosko is accused of allegedly posting their personal information online. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Jackson A. Cosko illegally used a computer in the office of Democratic Sen. Maggie Hassan and and threatened a Hassan staffer later that day, court documents show. He allegedly is behind the posted personal information about Republican senators on their Wikipedia pages.

The case against Cosko is detailed in an affidavit submitted in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia that includes details of how Cosko allegedly posted cell phone numbers and home addresses of the senators onto the web from House and Senate computer networks.

There’s Life Beyond the Hill but When Do You Explore It?
Former staffers share why they left

John Jones of Nareit just left his post as a House chief of staff for the private sector. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

John Jones was working on Iran sanctions legislation five years ago, when his boss, New York Sen. Charles E. Schumer, turned to Arizona Sen. John McCain and said, “Look, I’m for it, but you have to convince Jones.”

The exchange left Jones “stunned,” he recalled, but also empowered, as the weight of his responsibilities as Schumer’s national security director dawned on him.

Jeff Flake’s Ex-Chief on What to Do When It’s Time to Go
‘To say that folks sometimes disagreed with positions my former boss had is a bit of an understatement’

Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., talks with Chandler Morse during a Senate Judiciary Committee markup session in May 2013. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

If your boss retires, resigns or loses an election, there is no clinging to your job in Congress. Your job will cease to exist.

That’s not always a bad thing. Chandler Morse got to cook dinner in the middle of the week for the first time in his 11-year-old child’s life because Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake decided to retire.

How a ‘Card-Carrying National Security Nerd’ Got to Congress
Mike Gallagher applies the ‘lance corporal test’ to everything he does

On working on Syria issues, "you peer behind the witness curtain and no one’s there. It’s just you," Gallagher said. (Courtesy of Gallagher)

Mike Gallagher preferred to be locked in a room, away from the cameras, writing white papers.

After the Wisconsin Republican got out of the military, he went to work for the Senate Foreign Relations panel, handling Middle East, North Africa and counterterrorism issues under Chairman Bob Corker.

This Is DC’s Unsung Skill, From the Capitol to K Street
Are you ready to humble? Knowing what you don’t know is the best way to get ahead

Arshi Siddiqui’s first job at the Capitol had her answering phones and sorting mail. Now she’s a partner at Akin Gump. (CQ Roll Call)

OPINION — Every fall, requests for coffee from friends and friends-of-friends seeking career advice inevitably increase, particularly during election years as people assess potential opportunities at a current or new job. These conversations often remind me of my first Hill job, not due to any shining or standout moments, but because the lessons learned during those initial eight months remain relevant to the career advice I give today.

I began my job search with a fresh law degree at the age of 24 saddled with $100,000 in debt, all in the hopes of fulfilling a long-standing dream of working on Capitol Hill. My grand vision quickly crashed into reality, and I considered myself fortunate to land an entry-level Hill job answering phones, sorting mail, and drafting constituent letters for what was essentially an extended interview for an upcoming legislative opening.