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3 things to watch: ‘Low expectations’ for Trump’s trip to meet Japan’s new emperor
‘I don’t think that the purpose of this trip is to focus on trade,’ administration official says

President Donald Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe hold a news conference at Mar-a-Lago in April 2018. The two leaders will spend another few days together when Trump visits Japan Saturday through Tuesday. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump will land in Japan on Saturday for a series of high-level meetings, but White House officials and experts say to expect a trip heavy on pomp-and-circumstance and light on substance.

In a sign of how important the U.S.-Japanese relationship is to the Asian country, Trump will become the first foreign leader to meet its new emperor, Naruhito. He will also meet several times with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe for discussions on a list of issues ranging from trade to North Korea.

For 2020 Democrats, a bull market for bashing Wall Street?
Sanders, Warren hope bashing big banks still resonates with voters

Sens. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., are among the Democrats running for president who made curbing Wall Street excesses cornerstones of their campaigns. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In 2016, a New York City real estate developer who inherited hundreds of millions of dollars managed to win the presidency after convincing thousands of Rust Belt voters that the daughter of a textile salesman was an untrustworthy elitist because she gave a few paid speeches to a Wall Street investment bank. Four years later, some of the nearly two dozen Democrats running for president are retreading the populist path that runs roughshod over Wall Street.

The candidates hope bashing big banks still resonates with voters, but they’re also broadening the message to include other economic issues that divide the haves from the have-nots. “The last three presidential elections have all been Main Street versus Wall Street, and — increasingly — about the Rust Belt versus Wall Street,” said Andy Green, managing director of economic policy at the Center for American Progress.

Ocasio-Cortez grills CEO of pharma company making billions on government-patented HIV drug
Daniel O’Day faced scathing questions over taxpayers funding research and development for blockbuster drug

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., was among the Democrats on the House Oversight Committee grilling Gilead CEO Daniel O’Day on Thursday over the high price of the HIV prevention drug, Truvada. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Gilead CEO Daniel O’Day faced scathing questions at a House hearing Thursday, with Democrats demanding answers on how the drug manufacturer could charge $1,700 a month for an HIV prevention drug discovered through taxpayer-funded research.

“How can Gilead do this? How can our system allow a company to take a drug treatment that was developed with taxpayer funds and abuse its monopoly to charge such astronomical prices?” Oversight and Reform Chairman Elijah E. Cummings asked at the top of the hearing. “This lifesaving treatment would not exist but for the research funded by the CDC and the NIH.”

Trump pledges to reject dirt from other countries on 2020 foes
POTUS has new warnings for China and Iran, including even more tariffs for Asian rival

President Trump (right) speaks as Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán looks on in the Oval Office on Monday. (John T. Bennett/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump on Monday vowed to reject any dirt on his 2020 opponents that originates in a foreign country, just a week after his personal attorney canceled a trip to Ukraine allegedly to search for just that.

Trump also threatened to slap tariffs on even more Chinese-made goods as the two economic powerhouses barreled toward a full-scale trade war as markets around the globe dropped significantly. 

Trump threatens China over trade talks, contradicts top adviser on tariffs’ effect at home
China responds to Trump’s tariff hike saying it will start import fees on $60 billion in U.S. products in June

Chinese and U.S. flags are displayed in front of a portrait of China’s late communist leader Mao Zedong outside the Forbidden City in November 2017 in Beijing. Relations have cooled since then, with President Trump on Monday threatening the Asian giant over stalled trade talks. (Lintao Zhang/Getty Images file photo)

The Dow Jones Industrial Average tumbled around 450 points Monday and the S&P 500 index was down by around 50 points as trading opened on a nervous Wall Street amid the trade tit for tat between the United States and China.

The Chinese government earlier Monday responded to President Trump’s hiked tariffs on its goods by announcing it will slap import fees on $60 billion in U.S.-made products starting June 1. The retaliation is a signal the world’s two leading economic powers could be barreling toward a full-scale trade war.

Chill in China trade talks is all Biden’s fault, Trump says
Former VP has not been involved in negotiations that appear to be collapsing

President Trump is trying to blame stalling trade talks with China on former Vice President Joe Biden, seen here talking to reporters at the Capitol. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 12:20 p.m. | President Donald Trump is blaming former Vice President Joe Biden and the rest of the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates for a sudden chill in trade talks between his administration and America’s top economic rival.

Biden, who polls show is the Democratic frontrunner, has not been involved in any substantive talks about trade or any other matter since he left office in January 2017. But, according to Trump — who often takes his weaknesses and tries to blame them on his political foes — it’s all Biden’s fault.

Tiger’s Rose Garden moment ignores bogeys on his personal scorecard
‘I tried to hang in there,’ golf legend says of many struggles before fifth Masters win

President Donald Trump places the Presidential Medal of Freedom around the neck of professional golfer Tiger Woods at the White House on Monday. (John T. Bennett/CQ Roll Call)

Personal hardship and scandals? What hardship and scandals?

The scene in the Rose Garden Monday evening, when President Donald Trump lavished praise on Tiger Woods before placing the Presidential Medal of Freedom around his neck, focused only on the eagles and birdies on the golf legend’s scorecard. But the many bogeys from his personal life — to use a golf analogy only seems apt — hung over the event.

Report: Anti-Muslim groups funded by some mainstream philanthropies
Council on American-Islamic Relations report peels back donations to ‘fringe’ groups

Frank Gaffney, president, Center for Security Policy, identified by CAIR as an anti-Muslim hate group, testifies at a House Armed Services Committee hearing in 2006. (Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Politically active organizations known for stoking anti-Muslim animus and advocating policies that restrict the civil liberties of Muslims have gotten millions in contributions from mainstream philanthropic institutions, according to a new report from a Muslim civil rights organization.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations tracked contributions over a two year period to 39 organizations it identifies as anti-Muslim hate groups and uncovered donations from pillars of U.S. philanthropy.

3 things to watch when Trump, GOP senators talk tricky trade issues
Sen. Grassley will attend three days after his ultimatum to the president over tariffs

Sen. Charles E. Grassley, R-Iowa, will be among GOP senators talking trade Thursday with President Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Seeking to build support among his fellow Republicans for a key trade pact, Donald Trump will meet privately Thursday afternoon with Republican senators. And fireworks are possible if the president refuses to drop his tariffs on two U.S. neighbors despite GOP pleas and threats.

The White House has yet to submit to Congress a revised version of the North American Free Trade Agreement, which Trump’s top trade advisers negotiated with Mexico and Canada amid a litany of presidential demands and threats toward two longtime U.S. allies.

Democrats learning their subpoenas are only as powerful as Trump allows
Congress has never faced the all-encompassing opposition to administrative oversight that president is putting up

“We’re fighting all the subpoenas” that Democrats want to throw at his White House and his business empire, President Donald Trump said last week. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

As Donald Trump vows to fight every congressional subpoena issued by House committees investigating his presidency and personal affairs, Democratic lawmakers and strategists are coming to grips with a new reality in which the subpoena might be obsolete.

“At this point, it’s just a piece of paper,” a former senior congressional investigative aide said. “It’s useless.”