donald-trump

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard: Mueller discovering collusion could have ‘led to civil war’
Hawaii congresswoman has centered her 2020 campaign on her anti-war views

The presidential campaign of Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, has not gained traction in early polls since her February kickoff event. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard appeared relieved that Robert S. Mueller III’s investigation did not establish a case that the Donald Trump campaign colluded with Russia in the 2016 election and urged her Democratic colleagues to move on.

The Hawaii congresswoman, who has centered her fledgling 2020 campaign on her anti-war views, raised the possibility that the discovery of collusion could have set in motion a “terribly divisive crisis,” and even a civil war.

Mueller report isn’t changing 2020 campaign dynamics — yet
Conclusions have emboldened some Republicans, but Democrats still aren’t talking about Russia

While some Republicans like South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham used the Mueller report to double down on defending Trump, Democrats signaled they’d continue their 2018 focus on economic issues  — and not the Russia investigation — heading into 2020. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

As news of the just-completed Russia investigation engulfs Washington, not much has changed on the campaign trail — for either party.

The full report by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III has yet to see the light of day. And with the 2020 elections more than a year and a half away, plenty could change between now and then. But so far, the calculation on both sides isn’t too different from the past two years.

Nancy Pelosi: the Democratic Party’s undisputed leader
Speaker keeps her party together and Trump back on his heels

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., leaves her weekly news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center on Thursday March 14, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

OPINION — For most of the last campaign cycle, Republican ad-makers treated then-House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi like a piñata.

They used her name and image in thousands of GOP television spots around the country, trying to turn the midterm election into a referendum on her liberalism and “San Francisco values.” That effort failed, of course, because midterms are never about the minority party’s congressional leadership, at least not when the president is someone as controversial and polarizing as Donald Trump.

Capitol Ink | Mueller Lite Barr

When it comes to younger voters, watch the margin of victory
Republicans haven’t carried 18-to-29-year-olds in an election cycle since 1994

Louisiana Republican John Kennedy, then a candidate for U.S. Senate, greets fans at a tailgate party before an Alabama-LSU football game in Baton Rouge, La., in 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

There’s really no question Democrats are going to win younger voters in 2020. But what matters for them is the size of their margin of victory. 

Republicans haven’t carried 18-to-29-year-olds in an election cycle since 1994, when exit polling showed them besting Democrats in this age group, 51 percent to 49 percent. They broke even with Democrats among younger voters in the 1998 midterms, but it’s been at least 30 years since Republicans carried 18-to-29-year-olds in a presidential cycle.

House Democrats zip lips on Mueller report, want to see it for themselves
Committee chairs give Barr an April 2 deadline to turn into full findings

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., declined on Monday to speculate on the Mueller report other than that she wants to see it in its entirety. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats on Monday mostly avoided talking about Robert S. Mueller III’s report or what comes next, a day after Attorney General William P. Barr informed Congress that the special counsel “did not establish” a case that the Trump campaign colluded with Russia in the 2016 election.

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler and five other House Democratic chairs sent a letter to the attorney general on Monday demanding that he deliver Mueller’s full report to Congress by next Tuesday, April 2.

Trump accuses some who investigated him of ‘treasonous’ actions
Release of full Mueller report ‘wouldn’t bother me,’ president says

Special counsel Robert Mueller walks with his wife Ann Mueller on Sunday in Washington. President Trump said the former FBI director acted honorably in his Russia election meddling probe, but also lashed out at some involved. (Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Monday accused unnamed people involved in the Justice Department’s special counsel investigation of “treasonous” acts and said he is not opposed to the release of Robert S. Mueller III’s report.

“There are a lot of people out there that have done some very, very evil things, very bad things — I would say treasonous things against our country,” Trump said in what sounded like a warning.

Democratic committee chairmen shift focus to Barr as House investigations forge ahead
House Democratic leaders want to examine what led attorney general to his conclusions

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler made it clear that Attorney General William Barr’s four-page summary of the Mueller report doesn’t answer a number of questions into the investigation into possible obstruction of justice. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The key Democratic-controlled House committees investigating President Donald Trump and his administration are forging ahead with their probes into the president, his finances, and allegations of nepotism despite special counsel Robert S. Mueller’s conclusion publicized Sunday that he could not “establish” a case that that the Trump campaign colluded with Russia during the 2016 elections.

But while House Democrats continue with their investigative work, they made clear Sunday that Attorney General William Barr’s four-page summary of Mueller’s key findings does not quell their appetite for information about Mueller’s 22-month probe.

White House says Democrats and Mueller tried to ‘overthrow’ Trump
White House spokeswoman warns that Democrats should ‘be careful’ about continuing investigations

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the media and Democrats have accused the president of being an agent of a foreign government, which she said amounts to treason. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 9:55 a.m. | The White House lashed out at Democrats and Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III, accusing them of trying to “overthrow” President Donald Trump.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders called Mueller being unable to establish Trump 2016 campaign coordination with Russians “a great reminder also of the rule of law … but it’s also a sad reminder of the lack of accountability that started to seep into the media and into Democrats that have gone out for the last two years actually over two years and accused the president the United States of being an agent of a foreign government.

Some Republicans want an apology over Mueller investigation
Republicans celebrating a win, some calling for apologies, but members from both parties still want to see the full report

Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III “did not establish” collusion between the Donald Trump campaign and Russia but left the question of whether the president obstructed justice up to Attorney General William Barr. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Congressional Republicans claimed victory Sunday that a letter from Attorney General William Barr summarizing the special counsel investigation ended the debate about whether Donald Trump’s campaign knowingly colluded with the Russian government.

But Democrats said the letter did not adequately allay their concerns about whether the president is guilty of obstruction of justice, and demanded that the attorney general hand over the full Mueller report and its underlying documents.