A Universal Message at ‘March for Our Lives’ — Vote This November
Demonstrators chanted ‘Vote them out! Vote them out!’

Demonstrators watch speakers on a monitor at Saturday’s student-led March for Our Lives rally on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington to call for action to prevent gun violence. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As hundreds of thousands of people from all over the United States flocked to the “March For Our Lives” rally in Washington on Saturday, the message was clear: Hit the polls this November.

“Vote them out! Vote them out!” the crowd of roughly half a million people chanted throughout the afternoon, referring to members of Congress who have resisted calls to enact sweeping gun control legislation.

March for Our Lives in Washington: What You Need to Know
Congress passed its first gun measure in years as part of omnibus, but Democrats want more

The March For Our Lives crowd fills Pensylvania Avenue in Washington on Saturday morning. The protest held in the wake of the Parkland, Fla., school shooting in February called for an end gun violence and mass shootings in schools. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Millions of demonstrators across the U.S. will take to the streets Saturday to call for action from Congress to prevent gun violence.

City officials in Washington, D.C., where the main March For Our Lives event kicks off at noon, estimate the rally will attract roughly 500,000 visitors to Pennsylvania Avenue.

Trump v. Biden? President and Former VP Lobby for a Fistfight
Burr and Hamilton used guns in 1804

President Donald Trump on Thursday tweeted he would put former Vice President Joseph R. Biden, Jr., “down” in a fist fight they both appear to want. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Forget a debate. President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. want to throw down with their fists.

Back in 1804, Vice President Aaron Burr and political rival Alexander Hamilton chose to settle their deep differences in perhaps the most American way, with guns. But Biden and Trump want to face off in an even more old-school way, by throwing hands.

Capitol Ink | NRA NIMBY

On Omnibus, Congressional Leaders Are All Feeling Good
Ryan, Schumer and Pelosi all say they feel negotiations are in a good place

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., speak to reporters following a meeting of House and Senate leaders in Speaker Ryan’s office on the $1.3 trillion fiscal 2018 omnibus appropriations bill on Wednesday, March 21, 2018. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Congressional leaders emerged just before 11 a.m. Wednesday from a meeting to negotiate outstanding issues on a fiscal 2018 omnibus spending bill predicting a deal was forthcoming in a matter of hours. 

“We feel like we’re in a good place,” the Wisconsin Republican said upon exiting his office, where the meeting was held.

Student Suspended After Call to Amodei’s Office
Came during the nationwide student walkout over gun violence last week

A high school student was suspended after making a call to the office of Rep. Mark Amodei, R-Nev. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A student from Reno is saying his civil liberties were violated after he was suspended from his high school after calling Nevada Rep. Mark Amodei.

Noah Christiansen called his congressman’s office last week while students across the country walked out of classes in support of gun control, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reported.

Shooter Targets Rep. Loudermilk but Misses, Congressman Says
FBI investigating September incident in which bullet was found embedded in back of car

Rep. Barry Loudermilk, R-Ga., was shot at during two separate incidents in 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

For the second time in less than a year, a shooter took aim at Rep. Barry Loudermilk but missed, the congressman said.

Loudermilk was driving through the North Georgia mountains in September with his wife when they heard a “thump” hit the back of their car, the Georgia Republican told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution in a recent interview.

Suozzi Suggests Using the ‘Second Amendment’ on Trump
Democratic rep’s campaign forwarded a quote from Thomas Jefferson to ‘take arms’ against rulers

Rep. Tom Suozzi, D-N.Y., suggested people could take up arms against President Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democratic Rep. Tom Suozzi suggested at a town hall that President Donald Trump’s opponents could take up arms against the president.

The New York Democrat was speaking at an event in Huntington, New York, last week and said it was important to put pressure on the president, in a video obtained by the New York Post.

Capitol Ink | Trump Country Mile

House Passes School Safety Bill But Unlikely to Take More Action on Guns
GOP leaders deflect further action to the Senate since House has passed a background check reporting bill

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., holds a press conference with House GOP leadership in the Capitol on Wednesday, March 14, 2018, as a television displays live video from student protests against gun violence. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It’s not quite one and done, but the bill the House passed Wednesday to provide grants for schools to implement safety protocols and training is likely the last action GOP leaders will take this Congress in response to a recent spate of mass shootings. 

The House passed, 407-10, a bipartisan measure by Florida Republican John Rutherford called the Student, Teacher’s Officer’s Prevention (STOP) School Violence Act.