jeb-bush

What We Learned From New Hampshire

Trump passed a big test in New Hampshire but he'll face a bigger one in South Carolina. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Donald Trump and Sen. Bernard Sanders scored big wins in New Hampshire but the campaign for each party's nomination turns south and west, where the real race begins, according to political analysts and strategists Roll Call asked to analyze the Tuesday’s results.  

Here are their takes on what happened on Tuesday and what will happen next in South Carolina and Nevada:  

Quiz: How Much Do You Know About the New Hampshire Primary?

Attendees take a selfie before a before Democratic presidential candidate Senator Bernard Sanders, I-Vt., speaks at a rally in Manchester, N.H., on Monday. (Meredith Dake-O'Connor/CQ Roll Call)

You've been following the New Hampshire primary for the 2016 presidential election pretty closely. But have you been following closely enough?  

Going Full Grassley on the Iowa Caucuses

Kasich, left, and Grassley address a rally at the National Czech & Slovak Museum and Library in Cedar Rapids. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

WATERLOO, Iowa — Republican candidates learn a lot on the trail when they're competing in Iowa's first-in-the-nation presidential caucuses. Along with the sanctity of ethanol and the primacy of pork products, they eventually grasp this is Sen. Charles E. Grassley's state. When you run for president here, at some point, Iowa's senior senator will appear alongside you, and everyone knows who he is.  

"I didn't know Grassley was going to show up," said Bill Davidson, a bartender at The Supervisors Club, where the senator was introducing New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. Davidson sounded impressed, as if the event, being repeated over and over throughout the state in the run-up to Monday's caucuses, had been elevated.  

Lindsey Graham, a Former Rival, Endorses Jeb Bush

Graham endorsed his former rival on Friday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated: 10:25 a.m. |  South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham — a hawkish Republican who dropped his own presidential bid a few weeks ago — endorsed Jeb Bush, a former rival, for president on Friday.  

Speaking at a news conference in North Charleston, S.C., Graham said, "I’ve concluded without any doubt that Jeb Bush is ready on day one to be commander in chief.” Graham's endorsement came on the day after the first Republican debate of 2016, which he attended on Thursday night in his home state, and just weeks before the Iowa caucus and the New Hampshire primary. South Carolina, Graham said, will play an important role in pushing back on Donald Trump, the national front-runner.  

GOP Presidential Candidates Make Pitches to Influential Jewish Group

Trump addresses the Republican Jewish Coalition at Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center on Thursday. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Each of the 2016 White House hopefuls made their case to the Republican Jewish Coalition's Presidential Forum on Thursday why they'd be the strongest defender of America's and Israel's national security against the kind of violence seen in San Bernardino, Calif., Wednesday.

Nearly all of the candidates — Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul was detained by Senate votes and never made it — argued that the incident was an example of the terrorist threat facing America and Israel and proceeded to attack President Barack Obama for not readily using the term "radical Islamic terrorism."  

Cruz and Rubio 'Flavor of the Month'

Cruz, left, and Rubio, right, are both first-term senators, but Rubio enjoys more establishment support. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

With 60 days to go until the Iowa caucuses, Senators Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz and are attempting to capitalize on recent momentum in a GOP field long dominated by this year's two outsider candidates.  

Cruz is now in second place  in Iowa, and Rubio is second behind Donald Trump in th e Granite State, according to several polls . Both candidates trail Trump and Ben Carson in national polling averages .  

Poll Shows GOP Focused on Terrorism, Democrats on the Economy

Capitol Police officers stand by an armored vehicle in front of the east front of the Capitol on Monday. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

The latest American Values Survey paints a picture of a mistrustful, world-weary electorate that’s pretty much had it with political dynasties, monolingual immigrants and political correctness in general.  

Aside from the logical divide on who the two parties' official standard-bearers will be, both sides are far apart on the most critical issues facing the nation, the poll shows.  

Ahead of Fourth Debate, Republican Confidence in Bush Falters

GOP.candidates.poll

But ahead of the debate, the latest The Economist/YouGov poll shows the percentage of Republicans who think Bush could win the general election falling.  

The poll, released Tuesday, shows only 44 percent of Republicans think Bush could win the general election, regardless of who emerges as the Democratic nominee. That's down from 53 percent from just two weeks ago.  

Coasting to Victory: D.C. Bar Handicapping Presidential Race

Coasters featuring political figures such as former Speaker John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, center, are being offered at the Off the Record bar in the Hay Adams Hotel. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

No matter their standing in the latest polls, every White House hopeful is virtually guaranteed to soak up some attention at D.C.’s historic Off the Record bar.  

The fabled watering hole, which is just a hop, skip and a jump (stumble?) from the Oval Office, intends to handicap the upcoming presidential race by keeping tabs on which signature drink coasters — the extra-long faces of many those vying to be commander-in-chief grace the limited-edition series — customers routinely snatch up before rolling home.