lindsey-graham

Why Stopping Trump at Convention Is No Cure-All

Cruz’s unexpectedly strong victories in Maine and Kansas give some Republicans fresh hope that Trump will fail to win the 1,237 delegates necessary to clinch the nomination. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. – Michael Najvar is part of the Republican Party’s electoral bedrock: The 67-year-old Texan says he has voted for every GOP presidential nominee since Ronald Reagan. But that’s a streak that might end this fall, the Donald Trump supporter says, if rival campaigns and party bosses use a contested convention to block the New York billionaire from the presidential nomination.  

“If they used a brokered convention, they’d destroy the GOP,” says Navjar, who attended the Conservative Political Action Conference on Saturday wearing Trump’s signature “Make America Great Again” red hat.  

Rubio's Senate Backers Seek to Sway More Colleagues

Daines is among the senators who campaigned for Rubio in Iowa. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Florida Republican Marco Rubio's strong third-place finish in the Iowa caucuses could accelerate his bid to secure Senate endorsements for his presidential campaign, supporters said Tuesday.

Rubio's campaign told Roll Call that in the aftermath of the showing in Iowa, aides have had conversations with many members of the House and Senate about endorsements.

Graham on Cruz v. Trump: Like Being 'Shot or Poisoned'

(Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

As Sen. Lindsey Graham sees it, making a binary choice between real estate mogul Donald Trump or Texas Sen. Ted Cruz for the Republican presidential nominee is like picking between being "shot or poisoned."  

"You get the same result," the South Carolina Republican said Friday of the difference between the leading GOP contenders. To Graham, who already gave up on his own presidential bid, either of the candidates  loses to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.  

Graham's Exit Signals Decline of Military Service in Elections

The end of Lindsey Graham's candidacy means no major candidate for president has military service. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Given his dismally low polling numbers, Sen. Lindsey Graham's exit from the presidential race was no surprise. But his departure removes one of the most hawkish voices from the Republican race which has largely become about national security.  In the era of an all-volunteer military when only about 1 percent of the U.S. adult population serves  in the armed forces,  Graham removes one of the few candidates in the race who can relate to the shared experience of military service.  

Dan Caldwell, legislative director at Concerned Veterans for America, said his organization is more concerned about candidates' views on reforming the Department of Defense or Veterans Affairs than on whether they served in the military?  

Lindsey Graham Exiting Presidential Race

Graham's campaign never got traction. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

On the last day for candidates to remove their names from the South Carolina primary ballot, the Palmetto State's senior senator, Lindsey Graham, dropped out of the presidential race. 

After breaking the news to his supporters on a Monday morning conference call, Graham made the announcement  publicly in a video message Monday.

Races Where Spending Bill Vote Could Be an Issue

Neither Republicans nor Democrats, whose Senate committee is led by Tester, see a clear political win from the omnibus vote. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Congress hadn't even left town when political campaigns in some of the most competitive House and Senate races zeroed in on Friday’s vote on a massive government spending bill. But rather than cleaving along partisan lines, Democrats and Republicans — incumbents and challengers alike — came down on both sides of the issue depending on their states and districts, suggesting national party committees aren't likely to take up the vote in their national messaging. The chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, Mississippi Sen. Roger Wicker, voted for the bill – even though some of his most vulnerable colleagues opposed it – while Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee Chairman Jon Tester of Montana opposed it, with similar divergences in his own party. In the case of this bill, every candidate is on their own.  

Pennsylvania Senate Sen. Patrick J. Toomey voted against the bill, criticizing it as an instrument of the government’s “out-of-control spending” that would exacerbate the deficit, fund the resettlement of Syrian refugees and implement “damaging” federal regulations. And yet, in a statement released after the vote, he went on to tout that the bill for which he did not vote includes bipartisan proposals that he said will support jobs in the Keystone State. He also praised the bill’s suspension of the medical device tax, support for the military, Alzheimer’s research and health care for 9/11 responders.   That’s a contradiction that former Rep. Joe Sestak, who’s vying for the Democratic nomination to challenge Toomey in 2016, seized on in Twitter messages Friday afternoon. https://twitter.com/JoeSestak/status/677930799744868354  

Graham: Fight ISIS to Prevent More San Bernardino Shootings

Graham is proposing a sweeping AUMF against ISIS. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Sen. Lindsey Graham says the way to prevent more mass shootings like the one in San Bernardino, Calif., on Wednesday is to "make ISIL the losers they are."  

The South Carolina Republican, who is running for president, told reporters that an all-out war against the terror organization would "probably fix the problem more than gun control."  

GOP Presidential Candidates Make Pitches to Influential Jewish Group

Trump addresses the Republican Jewish Coalition at Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center on Thursday. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Each of the 2016 White House hopefuls made their case to the Republican Jewish Coalition's Presidential Forum on Thursday why they'd be the strongest defender of America's and Israel's national security against the kind of violence seen in San Bernardino, Calif., Wednesday.

Nearly all of the candidates — Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul was detained by Senate votes and never made it — argued that the incident was an example of the terrorist threat facing America and Israel and proceeded to attack President Barack Obama for not readily using the term "radical Islamic terrorism."  

McCain: Obama Assertion on ISIS 'Embarrassing'

(Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Armed Services Chairman John McCain criticized President Barack Obama’s defiant defense of the administration's strategy to combat the Islamic State terror group.  

Speaker with reporters Tuesday, the Arizona Republican took umbrage with Obama’s assertion that GOP hawks have failed to offer an alternative plan for fighting the violent extremist groups. He also said building the Arab ground force he envisions is possible as long as Obama pledges to help it take down Syrian President Bashar Assad. “It was an embarrassing performance by the leader of the free world yesterday,” McCain said.  

Paris Terror Attacks Give Graham an Opening in 2016 Race

Graham (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Sen. Lindsey Graham has tried in vain to make the GOP presidential race a fight over who has the best plan to crush the Islamic State. But as coordinated terror attacks on Paris dominate headlines, will primary voters finally listen to the South Carolina Republican?  

Graham has long pushed for military intervention in Syria, with a substantial ground component. He told CQ Roll Call Monday that he hoped his message would pick up traction, particularly in New Hampshire — host of the first-in-the-nation presidential primary and where he will travel this weekend with Senate Armed Services Chairman John McCain.