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Impeachment news roundup: Feb. 3
House managers and Trump defense team revisit familiar themes in closing arguments

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a Democratic presidential candidate, arrives at the Capitol on Monday before the continuation of the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump. Warren is expected to leave Washington later Monday for Iowa for the first contest in the Democratic presidential primary. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 5 p.m.

Both sides in President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial delivered their closing arguments today, with Democrats defending their case — and staff members — while the president’s team repeated their allegations that the impeachment effort is just a bid to undo Trump’s election.

Impeachment news roundup: Jan. 31
Senate votes against motion to call witnesses

Laurie Arbeiter protests on Pennsylvania Avenue before the continuation of the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 8 p.m.

A motion to call witnesses at the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump was unsuccessful Friday evening, on a 49-51 vote. A later 53-47 vote Friday evening defined the next steps in the trial.

View from the gallery: Impeachment trial end in sight, senators fight common cold
Outside the chamber and in galleries, much talk of the “Senate plague”

Artists Art Lien, left, and William J. Hennessy Jr. sketch scenes from the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump in the Capitol on Thursday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell stood up to send a question to President Donald Trump’s defense team around 6:45 p.m. Thursday, but first he suggested an upcoming 45-minute break for dinner.

Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., instead of his usual response of “without objection,” changed it to a phrase that resonated with the haggard senators and others in the chamber. “I’m sure there’s no objection,” Roberts said, causing a murmur of laughter to spread even to the page delivering the paper card with McConnell’s question to the rostrum.

Impeachment trial endgame: Republicans hope for Friday vote to acquit Trump
Vote on considering witnesses, documents expected to fail, allowing McConnell to prevent further delays

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, arrives for the continuation of the Senate Impeachment Trial of President Donald Trump on Thursday. Collins is expected to vote with Democrats to consider witnesses but that vote may fail, leading to the trial ending Friday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate impeachment trial could end Friday if Republican confidence translates to them blocking a motion to consider witnesses and they are then able to move to a final vote to acquit President Donald Trump.

A few senators on the fence about witnesses have yet to make their intentions clear, so there is still room for a surprise turn of events. But several Republicans and Democrats seem to think a vote to consider witnesses will fail and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell will move immediately to votes on the two articles of impeachment.

At the Races: Iowa still matters after Monday

By Stephanie Akin, Bridget Bowman and Simone Pathé 

Welcome to At the Races! Each week we’ll bring you news and analysis from the CQ Roll Call team that will keep you informed about the 2020 election. Know someone who’d like to get this newsletter? They can subscribe here.

Impeachment news roundup: Jan. 30
Warren’s question to Roberts causes a murmur

Republican Rep. Mark Meadows watches Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer talk to reporters in the Senate subway during a break in President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 7:35 p.m.

An audible murmur emanated from both sides of the aisle when Chief Justice John Roberts read aloud Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s question asking whether the trial’s proceedings reflect poorly on the chief justice himself. Roberts did not visibly react to the contents of the card about himself as he read it aloud.

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