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Democrats Land Reid Recruit in Competitive Nevada District

Heck, a Republican, is vacating the 3rd District to run for Senate. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Nevada Republican Rep. Joe Heck's decision  to run for Senate last summer gave Democrats an opening to compete for his 3rd District seat. But up until Tuesday, the national party had taken heat for its struggles to recruit in the district and wasn't excited about the candidates already in the race.  

That changed when Jacky Rosen, the leader of a Henderson synagogue, announced her candidacy for the 3rd District Tuesday.  

Incumbency Isn't Always an Advantage in Fundraising

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In Illinois, 8th District Rep. Tammy Duckworth has raised more than vulnerable GOP Sen. Mark S. Kirk and fellow Democrat Andrea Zopp. Duckworth hauled in $1.46 million to Kirk’s $1.05 million. She ended the period with $2.8 million on hand, compared to Kirk’s $3.62 million.

The biggest surprise came in Arkansas' safe Republican Senate seat. Less than a month after launching his campaign, wealthy former U.S. attorney Conner Eldridge  reportedly raised $403,000 to Sen. John Boozman’s $359,000. Boozman, however, still holds the cash advantage with $1.12 million in the bank. Because House candidates generally raise less money than their upper chamber peers, it’s less unusual for them to out-raise incumbents.  

Harry Reid Endorses Kihuen in Nevada House Race

Reid endorsed Kihuen in a crowded Democratic primary in Nevada's 4th District. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, the dean of the Nevada congressional delegation, endorsed state Sen. Ruben Kihuen in a crowded Democratic primary in Nevada's 4th District on Thursday.  

Reid's endorsement of Kihuen, a former Reid aide, was widely expected. But his support could help Kihuen distinguish himself among the three other Democrats vying for the chance to take on freshman GOP Rep. Cresent Hardy — one of the most vulnerable House Republicans in the country.  

Internal Poll Shows Cresent Hardy Leading Potential Challengers

Hardy is one of the most vulnerable Republicans in the House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Rep. Cresent Hardy, R-Nev., leads all four of the potential Democratic opponents in head-to-head matchups for his 4th District seat, an internal poll conducted for his campaign and obtained by CQ Roll Call shows.  

Hardy — who is arguably the most vulnerable House Republican in 2016 — has the slimmest lead over former state Assemblywoman Lucy Flores.  

Poll: House Incumbents Who Oppose LGBT Rights Lose Support

Democrats want to target Garrett for his opposition to LGBT rights. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

A set of polls conducted for the Human Rights Campaign found incumbents would imperil their re-election chances if they oppose a bill that bans discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals.  

The polling, shared first with CQ Roll Call, found that in six districts held by Republicans, voters would be less likely to support the GOP incumbent if they opposed the Equality Act. A seventh poll conducted in a competitive seat held by a Democrat found the same result. The Equality Act is a bill introduced in July that would "extend existing non-discrimination laws to protect [LGBT] people."  

EMILY's List Targets 15 Republicans for 2016

Schriock is the president of EMILY's List. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

EMILY's List put 15 GOP incumbents "On Notice" for their re-election bids Monday, naming its top GOP targets for 2016, according to a release provided first to CQ Roll Call.  

The group, which backs women who support abortion rights, says each incumbent has a bad record on women's health issues, and will make it a priority to find female recruits to challenge them next fall. The list is almost identical to the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee's top targets in 2016, when the party will seek to put a dent in Republicans' historic House majority.  

With Horsford Out, Nevada Democrats Look Down Line (Updated)

Horsford won't run in 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Updated March 19, 10:40 p.m. | Former Nevada Rep. Steven Horsford's decision not to seek his old House seat next year has set off jockeying on the Democratic side for one of the party's top pickup opportunities.  

Republican Rep. Cresent Hardy defeated Horsford in 2014, but party leaders hoped to convince  the former lawmaker to run again this cycle, which should have favorable presidential-level turnout. Several Democrats expected to be interested in the race were waiting on Horsford. His decision against running was first reported by Nevada political reporter Jon Ralston, who tweeted that the former congressman was joining the prominent Las Vegas-based consulting firm R&R Partners. A Democratic source familiar with the discussions confirmed this to CQ Roll Call.  

DCCC Robocalls Target GOP on DHS Funding

Luján is chairman of the DCCC. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee will launch robocalls against more than two dozen House Republicans Tuesday over the Department of Homeland Security funding flap , according to a script of the call provided first to CQ Roll Call.  

Many of the 29 targeted Republicans represent districts atop the DCCC's list of pick up opportunities in 2016. Democrats must net 30 seats to win control of the House.  

Exclusive: NRCC Announces 12 Members in Patriot Program

Walden of Oregon is the NRCC chairman in 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The National Republican Congressional Committee announced 12 members will kick-start its Patriot Program for the House GOP's most vulnerable incumbents, according to a news release provided first to CQ Roll Call.  

Eleven of the members were elected in 2014, when Republicans made huge gains across the country. The 12 members represent districts where Democrats typically perform well in presidential cycles, making them top targets in 2016.  

The One-Term Caucus? Top House Targets in 2016

Poliquin arrives last week for check-in for new members. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

They haven't even been sworn in yet, but these members start off the cycle as underdogs in their quests for re-election in 2016.  

Most of 2016's initial targets are incoming Republicans, swept into office in a GOP midterm wave . They will represent districts Democrats carried with big margins in presidential election years — seats the newly minted Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Chairman Ben Ray Luján will probably want back. Only one vulnerable Democrat made this list.