presidents

Canada's Trudeau Could be Obama's Progressive Heir

Trudeau could be the natural heir to Obama's progressive legacy. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Barack Obama's joint press conference with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Thursday had all the hallmarks of a torch-passing between progressive leaders.  

Obama repeatedly touted his younger counterpart's work on climate change and referenced the liberal values he and Trudeau share. He even gave Trudeau, 44, advice on coloring his hair when the stress of his office turns it gray.  

6 Ways Nancy Reagan Changed America

Former first lady Nancy Reagan, here in 1988, will be remembered for the "Just Say No" campaign and more. (Photo: Andrew D. Bernstein/Contributer/Getty Images)

Former first lady Nancy Reagan died Sunday morning at 94.  

100 Years on the Front Lines of History

Former Sens. Chris Dodd, D-Conn., right, and Harris Wofford, D-Pa., prepare to testify before a Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee hearing entitled "The Peace Corps, The Next Fifty Years" in 2011. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

If the filmmaker putting the finishing touches on a biopic about former Sen. Harris L. Wofford had waited for the lifelong activist to hang it up before rolling tape, the forthcoming documentary might never have gotten made.  

The Pennsylvania Democrat, who is poised to join the nonagenarian set in a few weeks (April 9, to be exact), shows no signs of slowing down, doggedly championing progressive policies — like he did in 1936 while distributing campaign materials for President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s first re-election push — same as he has for going on a century.  

On Court Pick, Obama Turns to Those He Trusts Most

Cutter, Obama's deputy re-election campaign manager, is helping the White House with its efforts to pick a Supreme Court nominee. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

President Barack Obama is turning to a handful of trusted lieutenants -- some no longer on his staff -- in his bid to fill the late Antonin Scalia’s Supreme Court seat. And the reliance on his inner circle is vintage Obama.  

Leading the charge inside the White House are a senior aide who played key roles in the $80 billion bailout effort of the U.S. auto industry and a high-powered Washington attorney who represented Obama’s first chief of staff in a legal case involving the president’s former Senate seat.  

Hardened Positions, Feelings at Oval Office Meeting on SCOTUS

Obama and McConnell talk during a meeting with Senate leaders, and leaders of the Senate Judiciary Committee, to discuss the vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court in the Oval Office at the White House. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

A high-level Oval Office meeting Tuesday between top senators and President Barack Obama left no path forward on the contentious issue of whether the president should nominate someone to replace the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.  

Senior Senate Republicans were "adamant" during meeting that they would block any Supreme Court nominee Obama submits, according to Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid.  

Trump and Christie: A Brash Buddy Movie

Christie and Trump visit during a break in the FEB. 6 Republican presidential debate in Manchester, N.H. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images file photo)

Whether the presidential race just got a lot more entertaining or frightening is the question.  

In true “the enemy of my enemy is my friend” fashion, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie endorsed New York billionaire Donald Trump in the race to be the Republican nominee, and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio must be sweating more than is his wont.  

Obama: Don't Buy the Economic 'Snake Oil'

Obama speaks after touring the Saft America Advanced Batteries Plant in Jacksonville, Fla., on Friday. (Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

President Barack Obama on Friday delivered an upbeat assessment of the still-healing economy, but he also warned against betting on "snake oil" and "chasing false promises" to continue the recovery. Yet, his message was often met with lukewarm applause by a Florida crowd.  

The pejorative clearly was aimed at Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump and the rest of the GOP field.  And while the president did not name the Democratic Party’s likely nominee, his call for a “steady, persistent” hand to “finish the job” of healing the economy could be the start of a long wind-up to endorsing Hillary Clinton.  

Gitmo Executive Action Would Further Muddle Obama Legacy

Obama makes a statement about his plan to close the detention camp at the Guantánamo Bay in Roosevelt Room at the White House on Tuesday. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Congressional Republicans’ immediate rejection of an Obama administration plan to close the Guantánamo Bay military prison means yet another part of the president's legacy could be decided by the courts.  

Unable to convince a GOP-run Congress to support his plan and short on time to make good on his pledge to shutter the terrorist detention facility, Obama's last option is to go it alone. And given recent history, that’s why experts expect the lawsuits to begin.  

Colicchio, Pingree Pursue 'Plate of the Union' Campaign

Chef Tom Colicchio, a guest of Rep. Chellie Pingree, moves toward the second floor after President Barack Obama's State of the Union address in the Capitol's House chamber, January 20, 2015. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Healthful dining advocates Tom Colicchio and Rep. Chellie Pingree are hoping to spark next-generation food policy activists with an organizing challenge designed to thrust college kids into the 2016 presidential race.  

Colicchio, the “Top Chef” personality who has graduated to judging politicians in his role as co-founder of Food Policy Action, is taking the fight for a better food system to battleground states.  

Defiant Obama to Congress: Give Gitmo Plan 'Fair Hearing'

President Obama speaks in the White House’s Roosevelt Room on Tuesday about his plan to close the Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, military prison. He was joined by Defense Secretary Ashton Cater (right), with a painting of former President Theodore Roosevelt on horseback behind them. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

President Barack Obama on Tuesday delivered a passionate call for Congress to give his plan to close the Guantánamo Bay military prison a “fair hearing,” casting the terrorist detention center as a hindrance to national security.  

Even before Obama spoke about the plan , Republican lawmakers dubbed it  “illegal” and made clear it has almost no chance of being enacted. But Obama ended his remarks with a defiant tone.