senate

First-Ever Home Run Punctuates Congressional Softball Game
Rep. Mia Love, Roll Call’s Bridget Bowman were game MVPs

New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand greets her interns after the Congressional Women’s Softball Game on Wednesday at the Watkins Recreation Center. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Roll Call’s Bridget Bowman hit the first out of the park home run in the Congressional Women’s Softball Game’s 10-year history Wednesday just as the skies opened up in the fifth inning.

The triumphant Bad News Babes and the members’ team hurried off the softball field as soon as the coaches agreed to call the game.

Bipartisan Lawmakers Call for Better Alzheimer’s Detection Capabilities
Proposed comprehensive detection measures aim to lessen burden on families and patients

Representative Linda Sanchez, D-Calif.,  on Tuesday, July 25, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Bipartisan lawmakers, policy advocates, and medical professionals came together Tuesday with nonprofit UsAgainstAlzheimer’s to call for earlier assessment and diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease.

West Virginia Republican Sen. Shelley Moore Capito and California Democratic Rep. Linda T. Sanchez touted the CHANGE Act, legislation introduced in February by Capito and Democratic colleague Debbie Stabenow of Michigan.

Analysis: Migrants, ‘Rocket Man’ and Trump’s Ever-Changing Mind
Executive order another contradictory move in an ever-changing presidency

President Donald Trump speaks to reporters as he arrives at the Capitol for a meeting on immigration with House Republicans on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Donald Trump is a hardliner. Until he’s not. Donald Trump is open to compromise. Until he’s not.

The president — yet again — on Thursday reversed himself on a major issue by ending his administration’s practice of separating migrant families. In doing so, he bowed to all kinds of pressure: from his wife and daughter, from human rights groups, from Democratic members — and even from his fellow Republicans.

Life Is No Picnic: White House Congressional Chowdown Gets Chop
President cancels Thursday evening confab, even as cooks prepared meals

Then House Speaker Newt Gingrich, R-Ga., poses with clowns for a picture at the congressional family picnic. July 29, 1996 (Maureen Keating/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump announced he will “cancel and postpone” Thursday evening’s congressional picnic at the White House because “we’re all so busy.”

“I was just walking over to the Oval Office and thinking, ‘You know, it just doesn’t feel right to have a picnic for Congress when we’re working on doing something so important.’” 

Word on the Hill: What’s Buzzing on Capitol Hill?
Kids take over the House floor, it’s time to play ball, and a Taste of West Virginia

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

We’re all over Capitol Hill and its surrounding haunts looking for good stories. Some of the best are ones we come across while reporting the big stories.

There is life beyond legislating and this is the place for those stories. We look for them, but we don’t find them all. We want to know what you see, too.

‘Trump Show’ Makes Tour Stop in Capitol Basement
President calls out Mark Sanford, opts against sticking to immigration

Speaker Paul D. Ryan escorts President Donald Trump to the House Republicans’ meeting Tuesday in the Capitol basement. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Republicans might have gone into their Tuesday evening meeting with President Donald Trump expecting a discussion about immigration policy, but what they got was an episode of what might be dubbed “The Trump Show.”

The president did discuss dueling immigration bills crafted by members of the GOP conference. And he urged them to send him a bill that closes what his team dubs “loopholes” that he claims compelled his administration to institute a zero-tolerance program that prosecutes all adult migrants who try to enter the United States illegally, a misdemeanor, even if they arrive with minor children.

With Immigration Controversy as Backdrop, GOP Senate Candidates Blast Democrats
Candidates in Missouri, West Virginia and Pennsylvania criticize Democratic bill to address separation policy

Patrick Morrisey, who is running against Sen. Joe Manchin III, is using the current immigration controversy to blast his Democratic opponent. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

While senators in both parties said Tuesday they want to solve the crisis of parents and children being separated before immigration cases are adjudicated, some Republican Senate candidates are focusing on criticizing Democratic incumbents who have signed on to a legislative fix.

At least three Senate nominees have come out on the attack against a proposal led by Judiciary ranking Democrat Dianne Feinstein of California that would bar parents and children from being separated by the Homeland Security Department except in unusual cases, such as when the parent does not have custodial rights.

Analysis: Trump Repeats False Claim on Dems, Family Separation
Cummings to GOP: “We need you to stand up for these children”

President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump and Vice President Mike Pence in the Capitol Rotunda on Feb. 28. Despite evidence to the contrary, the president continues to repeat falsehoods about his administration’s immigration policy that separates migrant children from parents, Bennett writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump on Tuesday repeated his false claim that Democrats are solely responsible for his decision to separate migrant children from their parents when they attempt to illegally enter the United States.

“As a result of Democratic-supported loopholes in our federal laws, most illegal immigrant families and minors from Central America … cannot be detained together or released together, only released,” he said during remarks at a small-business conference in Washington, adding that the “crippling loopholes … cause family separation that we don’t want.”

Word on the Hill: What’s Buzzing on Capitol Hill?
Massie is sassy, Huffman with a burn, and McCain is a proud friend

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

We’re all over Capitol Hill and its surrounding haunts looking for good stories. Some of the best are ones we come across while reporting the big stories.

There is life beyond legislating and this is the place for those stories. We look for them, but we don’t find them all. We want to know what you see, too.

Democratic Senators Ask If CFPB Nominee Worked on Immigration Policy Separating Children and Parents
Kathy Kraninger’s role at OMB involves oversight of DHS and Justice

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., wants to know if President Donald Trump’s nominee to lead the CFPB was involved in drafting the new immigration enforcement policy. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Did President Donald Trump’s nominee to lead the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau approve the administration’s “zero-tolerance” immigration policy that has led to a wave of families being separated near the Southern border?

That is the question posed by Democratic Sens. Sherrod Brown of Ohio and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts to Kathy Kraninger, the program associate director at the Office of Management and Budget whose job includes policy implementation oversight for both the Justice Department and Homeland Security Department, according to the senators.