syria

Trump to host Turkey’s Erdogan same day public impeachment hearings start
Bipartisan calls to cancel visit ignored, as experts say Washington still needs Ankara

President Donald Trump welcomes President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey at the White House in 2017. The Turkish leader makes a controversial return Wednesday. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan will be feted Wednesday at the White House despite his attacks on a longtime U.S. ally, his purchase of military equipment from Russia and calls from lawmakers in both parties to punish him.

President Donald Trump and top aides have ignored bipartisan calls to cancel Erdogan’s visit, which is expected to include a joint press conference on the same day public hearings in the House impeachment inquiry begin.

Often-talkative Trump goes quiet amid impeachment testimony, slowing economy
‘It’s almost like he is low energy these days,’ Democratic strategist says

President Donald Trump speaks to news media at the White House on Oct. 10. After damning testimony from White House aides and data showing a sluggish economy, he has ducked reporters' questions this week. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS | All week, reporters at the White House have waited for the announcement over the loudspeaker instructing the day’s press pool to report for duty pronto for unplanned presidential remarks. But, so far, the speaker has remained mostly silent — just like President Donald Trump.

Even during a term that has featured — at the time, at least — what felt like consequential weeks, this one quickly took on a different feel.

By praising Baghdadi-cornering K-9, Trump stirs Islam’s complicated dog history — and his own
President praises ‘beautiful’ military animal but has used ‘like a dog’ to hammer his critics, rivals

A U.S. soldier and military dog keep watch at Forward Operating Base Connelly in Afghanistan in August 2015. President Donald Trump is praising a military canine used in a Saturday raid that killed ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, but his own history with canines is complicated. (Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump has singled out a U.S. military dog that helped corner Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi before he killed himself during a Saturday mission in Syria. In doing so, he has waded into the Middle East’s — and his own — complicated history with the species.

As he announced the extremist group leader’s death in Sunday morning remarks from the White House, the commander in chief sent mixed messages about canines. It was difficult to determine how Trump, widely known as not a big animal fan, feels about dogs, even as he described the Syria raid.

Photos of the Week: Amid impeachment battle, members pay respect to Cummings
The week of Oct. 25 as captured by Roll Call’s photojournalists

House Judiciary Committee members, from left, Reps. David Cicilline, D-R.I., Jamie Raskin, D-Md., and Joe Neguse, D-Colo., arrive for the House Democrats’ caucus meeting in the Capitol on Tuesday morning. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

This week the Capitol was consumed with impeachment depositions, the storming of the SCIF, and a guy named Zuckerberg.

Gabbard won’t run again for House seat, stays in presidential race
Four-term Hawaii representative has clashed with fellow Democrats over military and foreign policy issues

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, told supporters she would not seek reelection to the House and urged them to support her bid for the presidential nomination (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Tulsi Gabbard, the last House member still in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, said Thursday she would not seek reelection for her Hawaii seat.

“I believe I can best serve the people of Hawaiʻi and our country as your President and Commander-in-Chief,” she said in an announcement posted on Twitter.

Trump to lift sanctions because Turkey-Kurd cease-fire is ‘permanent’
‘Let someone else fight over this long-bloodstained sand,’ president says

President Donald Trump says a “permanent” cease-fire has been reached between Turkish and Kurdish forces on Wednesday as Vice President Mike Pence, left, and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo look on. (Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Wednesday announced what he called a longterm cease-fire between Turkish and Kurdish forces, saying he would lift economic sanctions he slapped on Ankara after its invasion of northern Syria.

Trump said a temporary cease-fire there “has held held, and held well,” adding it is “permanent.” He noted not much in the chaotic region can truly be, before adding: “I think it will be permanent.” Of the U.S. operation there, he said, “Now, we are getting out.”

Impeachment news roundup: Oct. 21
OMB officials refuse to testify about Ukraine deal while Republicans move to censure Schiff

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said Republicans will introduce a privileged motion to censure Rep. Adam B. Schiff, who is overseeing the impeachment investigation. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer is seeking details from the acting Director of National Intelligence and the intelligence community inspector general about efforts to protect the whistleblower who provided information about the conversation between President Donald Trump and the president of Ukraine.

The New York Democrat expressed concern amid ongoing and public attacks from Trump and threats to expose his or her identity. 

Lopsided cease-fire ‘deal’ emboldens Turkey, harms U.S. allies
Temporary, nonbinding, requiring nothing: ‘We got what we wanted,’ foreign minister says

President Donald Trump speaks to reporters on the South Lawn of the White House on Oct. 10. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS — President Donald Trump tweeted Thursday that Vice President Mike Pence had reached an agreement with Turkey’s president for a halt to hostilities in northern Syria.

“This is a great day for civilization,” Trump wrote. “People have been trying to make this “Deal” for many years.”

Pence says Turkey has agreed to cease fire in northern Syria
Trump has faced a bipartisan backlash over pulling U.S. troops from buffer zone along Turkey-Syria border

Smoke rises over the Syrian town of Ras al-Ain on Thursday as Turkish forces try to extend their control of more of northern Syria, which is currently held by Syrian Kurds. U.S. Vice President Mike Pence announced later Thursday that Turkey had agreed to a cease fire in the area. (Burak Kara/Getty Images)

Vice President Mike Pence announced on Thursday that a ceasefire agreement had been reached with the Turkish government that would allow for a cessation of fighting in northeast Syria where Syrian Kurds have been getting hammered for the last week.

Specifics of the ceasefire, which was to last for 120 hours, were initially scarce but Pence at a news conference in Ankara alongside Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said it was already being implemented.

Graham abruptly leaves hearing during official's testimony

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., questions a witness at a hearing in May. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., abruptly left a Senate Foreign Relations hearing Wednesday during the testimony of a senior administration official.

The moment came after nearly three hours of testimony by Brian Hook, the U.S. Special Representative for Iran. Most of Hook's statements defended the Trump administration's recent troop withdrawal from northern Syria.