taxes

Grassley Will Step into Tax Storm, Finance Gavel in Hand
Iowa Republican was a key player on big-ticket measures during his previous tenure as Finance chairman

Chairman Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, conducts a Senate Judiciary Committee markup in October. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Charles E. Grassley is expected to be the next chairman of the Finance Committee, putting the Iowa Republican at the center of the storm in the 116th Congress on what could be divisive debates over tax, trade and health care policy.

Grassley cited a sense of “optimism” fueled by the “pro-growth” policies of a Republican president and Congress. “Looking ahead. ... I want to continue to work to make sure that as many Americans as possible get to experience this good economy for themselves,” he said in a statement released Friday. “That means working to provide Americans with additional tax relief and tax fairness so they can spend more of their hard-earned money on what’s important to them.”

Trump Predicts ‘Deal-Making,’ Many Fights Ahead With Democrats
First up, both sides face border funding test in lame-duck session

President Donald Trump talks to reporters Wednesday, the day after the midterm elections. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump appears ready to make some deals — except when he’s threatening Democrats with “warlike” tactics.

Despite losing the House and several governorships in states that could be key for Trump’s 2020 re-election prospects, the president used a press conference last week to send widely divergent messages to lawmakers about just how much he wants to get done in the lame-duck remainder of the 115th Congress and after the 116th is seated in early January.

With an Ambitious Policy Agenda, Pelosi is Poised to Lead the House Again
Calls increased from Democratic incumbents and candidates asking for new generation of leaders

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi holds a news conference in the Capitol on Nov. 7, the day after Democrats had retaken control of the House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Basking in House Democrats’ midterm election wins, Nancy Pelosi is focused on the planks of the Democratic campaign platform that will become the new majority’s agenda: health care, infrastructure and cleaning up corruption in Washington.

But the California Democrat cannot escape questions about another theme that emerged on the campaign trail — opposition to her leadership.

Here’s All the House Republicans That Voters Sent Home
Incumbent losses cut across all factions of the Republican Caucus but most are moderates

Florida Republican Rep. Carlos Curbelo, pictured at Greenglade Elementary School polling place on Election Day in Kendale, Florida, is one of at least 19 House Republicans to have lost re-election. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated on November 13 at 11:41 p.m. | Voters have sent 23 House Republican incumbents and counting home, as the predicted Democratic wave materialized in the lower chamber’s midterm contests. 

The losses cut across all factions of the Republican Conference but most of the incumbents going home after this term are moderate members. With the number of House Republicans shrinking next year, conservatives are poised to become a larger portion of the conference. 

Democrats Win House Majority; Here’s What They’ll Do With It
Government overhaul first legislative item, followed by quick action on Dreamer protections, gun control

Now that House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and her party are back in power, they have several legislative priorities they wish to pursue. (Margaret Spencer/ CQ Roll Call)

Democrats have been abundantly clear about the top items that would be on their agenda if voters were to put them in the House majority, ranging from a campaign finance overhaul to legislation designed to reduce health care costs. 

Now that the midterm results have confirmed Democrats have won the House, here’s what you can expect with them in control next Congress. 

Trump: ‘I Don't Care’ if House Democrats Release My Tax Returns
President also downplays difficulty of split government

The Internal Revenue Service building in Washington. President Donald Trump says he wouldn’t care if House Democrats release his tax returns. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Trump claimed Monday he is not concerned about House Democrats obtaining and releasing his tax returns if they win the House majority in Tuesday’s midterm elections.

“I don’t care,” he told reporters as he arrived in Indiana for a campaign rally.

Congressional Leaders Warn of Democratic Check on Trump Presidency
McConnell frets that unfettered pipeline of judges will be halted

Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R), left, who is running for the U.S. Senate, and Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., conduct a rally at Skyline Attractions in Orlando on November 2, 2018. Graham has been active in campaigning to preserve the GOP Senate majority, which GOP leaders warned Monday was at risk.  (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Republican leaders pitched their closing midterm argument Monday: that Democratic gains would mean a check on the agenda of President Donald Trump, including the unimpeded seating of conservative judges, and a halt to the president’s border wall.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said his and the president’s efforts to “remake the federal judiciary would come to a screeching halt if there was a Majority Leader [Charles E.] Schumer.”

Kudlow to Democrats: If You Win, Forget About Raising Taxes
Trump’s top economic adviser says projected robust growth will bring down deficit

President Donald Trump speaks while flanked by Director of the National Economic Council Larry Kudlow during an event for American workers in the State Dining Room of the White House on Wednesday. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump’s top economic adviser warned Democrats Thursday that he would fight any tax increase to reduce the deficit if they take control of the House in the midterm elections next Tuesday.

Larry Kudlow, director of the National Economic Council, said tax increases won’t be needed to curb red ink because the administration is counting on robust economic growth of at least 3 percent a year.

Republicans Poised to Stand by Trump, Win or Lose
No matter the outcome in November, those who have backed Trump will continue to do so

No matter what happens in the midterms, most Republicans will continue to stand behind their man for the second half of his term, most in the party predict. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images file photo)

In 2006, the reckoning finally came for Republicans. After 12 years in power in the House, scandal after scandal brought the party down — Tom DeLay, the powerful majority whip from Texas, quit after being indicted, and Rep. Mark Foley of Florida resigned following a scandal involving underage congressional pages. The Iraq War was looking lost. And the president was a drag on everyone. Republicans lost 30 seats in the House, six in the Senate.

Almost immediately after the election, Republicans started eating their own.

Trump to Focus on Midwestern Battlegrounds in Final Midterms Tour
One president. 11 rallies. Eight states. Six days.

President Donald Trump waves to a crowd of supporters as he arrives at a rally at the International Air Response facility in Mesa, Ariz., on Oct. 19. Behind him is Arizona Republican Senate nominee Martha McSally. (Ralph Freso/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump will hit eight states with 11 campaign rallies in the final six days of the midterm election cycle with the House and Senate — and most of his domestic agenda — up for grabs.

Trump was in Washington on Monday and will remain there until Wednesday, when he will begin his final push to convince voters to keep both chambers in Republican hands. His tour will mostly focus on Midwestern and Mid-Southern battlegrounds.