trade

Trump weighs tariffs or quotas on uranium imports
The nuclear power industry argues import limits would bring higher costs for electricity producers and force some out of business

U.S. Department of Commerce building in Washington (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump is considering a Commerce Department report on whether imported uranium ore poses a threat to U.S. national security and the domestic production of nuclear power.

The president will weigh whether to impose tariffs or quotas on imported uranium following claims by the uranium mining industry that limits on foreign uranium imports are necessary to aid a shrinking industry. The nuclear power industry, meanwhile, argues import limits would bring higher costs for electricity producers and force some out of business.

Trump tries to revive North Korea talks in meeting with South Korea’s Moon
Experts see Moon urging U.S. leader to pursue ‘small deal’ with Kim Jong Un

President Donald Trump will meet with South Korean President Moon Jae-in at the White House on Thursday. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump will try to revive his push to strip North Korea of its nuclear weapons when he hosts South Korean President Moon Jae-in on Thursday. The visit comes as lawmakers worry about Kim Jong Un’s arsenal, with experts encouraging talks in hopes of even a “small deal.”

Trump’s second nuclear disarmament summit was cut short in late February after he and Kim reached an impasse over several issues, including the latter’s demand for some sanctions to be lifted before he started dismantling his atomic arms and long-range missile programs. Trump has signaled he was at least partially distracted during the meetings in Vietnam by his former personal lawyer Michael Cohen’s testimony before a House panel at the same time.

Trump likely to put economic, military ties ahead of human rights with Egypt’s Sisi
POTUS expected to warn Egyptian leader against closer military ties with Russia, official says

President Donald Trump welcomes Egyptian President Abdel Fattah Al Sisi during his arrival at the White House in 2017. Trump is expected to try to keep the Egyptian leader from drifting too close to Russia during their meeting on Tuesday. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images file photo)

When Donald Trump welcomes Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi to the White House on Tuesday, expect the U.S. president to stress military cooperation even amid questions about that country’s human rights record.

Human rights groups are accusing Sisi’s government of torturing political foes and using death sentences against opponents. What’s more, the Egyptian parliament has approved constitutional changes that would extend Sisi’s time in office.

Trump’s double backtrack ‘probably won’t matter very much’
Teflon president not likely to pay any political price for health care, border retreats

President Donald Trump shakes hands with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., as Sens. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., John Thune, R-S. Dak., Vice President Mike Pence and Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., look on at the Capitol on Jan. 9. His recent moves have irked his own party. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

ANALYSIS — Donald Trump irked even his fellow Republicans last week with his health care and border closure pushes, only to back off both, capping one of the most turbulent weeks of his chaotic presidency. But it’s unlikely to hinder his re-election fight.

Eager to hit the campaign trail with a reprise of many of the same themes that fueled his 2016 bid, Trump caught his party off guard by trying once again to repeal and replace the entire Obama-era health care law, before delaying any vote until after Election Day 2020. At the same time, he threatened for days to shutter ports of entry at the U.S.-Mexico border, before replacing that threat with one to first slap tariffs on Mexican-made automobiles.

‘If you can climb that, you deserve whatever you can get’ Trump says on wall visit
President heads to California one day after backing off — sort of — closure threat

President Donald Trump speaks during a press conference to announce his national emergency delclaration for the situation at the southern border on Feb. 15 in the White House's Rose Garden. He traveled to the border on Friday. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images file photo)

ANALYSIS — One day, President Donald Trump seemed dead set on closing ports of entry at the U.S.-Mexico border. The next, he had shelved that threat — maybe — for another aimed at pressuring Mexican officials to curb migrant flows into the United States.

That followed a retreat by the president on trying to pressure congressional Republicans into another attempt to repeal and replace former President Barack Obama’s entire 2010 health law. Fittingly, the latest roller coaster-like week of the Trump era ended with a presidential trip to the southern border.

Mexican official rejects Democratic effort to reopen new NAFTA
“Reopening it is as good as killing it,” said Jesús Seade, Mexican foreign affairs undersecretary for North America

American and Mexican flag fly over the Paso del Norte International Bridge on March 30, 2019, in El Paso, Texas. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

A top Mexican official Thursday ruled out renegotiating the proposed United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement to address Democratic concerns about labor and pharmaceutical provisions.

“Reopening it is as good as killing it,” said Jesús Seade, Mexican foreign affairs undersecretary for North America.

‘I don't see Joe Biden as a threat,’ Trump says
POTUS on former VP: ‘He’d have to run on the Obama failed record’

President Donald Trump talks with journalists before departing the White House on March 20. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Friday dismissed former Vice President Joe Biden as a threat to take his job in 2020, saying the longtime Democratic senator is only “a threat to himself.”

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Chinese President Xi isn’t headed to Mar-a-Lago for a trade summit just yet
‘If we have a deal, we’ll have a summit,’ Trump says

President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He in the Oval Office on Feb. 22. The senior Chinese official was back there Thursday to discuss a possible trade deal as talks between the two countries continue. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

Chinese President Xi Jinping isn’t headed to Donald Trump’s ornate Mar-a-Lago property just yet to talk trade.

The U.S. president told reporters Thursday afternoon he is not ready to invite the Chinese leader to his South Florida resort to try and finalize a trade pact because the two economic giants are not close enough to an agreement to bring in — in baseball terms — the closers.

As lawmakers fret, Trump takes closure threat to border with 2020 in mind
‘We felt the need to give him some advice,’ Kudlow says of economic warning to president

Supporters of President Donald Trump rally during his March 2018 visit to see border wall prototypes in San Diego. He returns to California on Friday as he mulls his threat to close the southern border's ports of entry amid an uptick in migrant apprehensions. (David McNew/Getty Images file photo)

The political and economic stakes will be high Friday when President Donald Trump heads to the U.S.-Mexico border after rankling members of both parties with a threat to close all ports of entry. But as lawmakers fret, he is keeping a major re-election issue on the minds of his supporters.

Trump flashed his unique approach to immigration and foreign policy last week when he floated the notion of closing the ports as a way to gain leverage over Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador — by preventing migrants from those countries from trekking up the U.S. border, which he will see Friday in Southern California. He is also using the threat to get Mexico to stop migrants as they move through that country.

Trump would veto tariffs-limiting legislation, Kudlow says
White House is ‘fully’ behind controversial Federal Reserve nominee

National Economic Council Director Lawrence Kudlow says the president would veto legislation targeting the administration’s tariff policy. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

The White House is poised for new battles with Congress over possible legislation targeting President Donald Trump’s tariff policy and a contentious Federal Reserve nominee.

Some key Republicans have joined Democrats in urging the president to drop his national security tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, with Senate Finance Chairman Charles E. Grassley, R-Iowa, saying recently he expects bipartisan compromise legislation “in the coming weeks” that would slap on time limits on the tariffs.