tv-land

How Ed Henry covered impeachment the first time
Roll Call alum is starting a new role at Fox News just as impeachment articles hit the Senate. That brought back some memories

Heard on the Hill alum Ed Henry gets ready for a new role at Fox News. (Courtesy Fox News)

Ed Henry had an interview scheduled with Bill Clinton. It was a relatively sleepy week in Washington, the State of the Union was approaching, and the young reporter planned to ask the president about his relationship with Congress.

Things changed. News of the Monica Lewinsky scandal broke, and what was supposed to be a routine sit-down turned into a 15-minute phone call brimming with executive denials: “not sexual,” “not improper,” “not true.”

Mar-a-Limbo: With Senate trial on hold, Trump faces uncertainty during Florida vacation
Despite likely acquittal, presidential scholars see an executive office likely changed forever

President Donald Trump arrives on the South Lawn of the White House before speaking to members of the media in Washington on Oct. 10. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Essay: For White House press pool on Trump’s impeachment day, the silence was deafening
President appeared to understand there are some historical events not even he can counter-program

President Donald Trump arrives at the White House early Thursday morning after a rally in Michigan. While Trump was speaking at the rally, the House voted to impeach him for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. (Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images)

ESSAY | The silence was deafening. Certainly not what I expected as the White House in-town pool reporter on the day President Donald Trump was impeached. 

Trump, famous for his feisty interactions with the press as a New York businessman and who flashed his penchant for drama as a reality television host, has transformed presidential communications.

Minutes after being impeached, Trump says House Dems earned ‘eternal mark of shame’
45th president joins Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton as only impeached chief executives

President Donald Trump addresses his impeachment during a Merry Christmas Rally at the Kellogg Arena on December 18, 2019 in Battle Creek, Mich.  While Trump spoke at the rally the House voted to impeach him, making Trump just the third president in U.S. history to be impeached. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

House Democrats will forever wear an “eternal mark of shame” for impeaching him on charges of abuse of power and obstructing Congress, President Donald Trump said Wednesday evening.

“Democrat lawmakers don’t believe you have the right to elect your own president,” Trump said to boos during a rowdy campaign rally in Battle Creek, Michigan. “Crazy Nancy Pelosi’s House Democrats have branded themselves with an eternal mark of shame.

Officially impeached, Trump must learn to live with ‘black mark’ on his presidency
‘He sold himself as ... someone who operates differently. … They just accept it,’ expert says

President Donald Trump is now the third president to be impeached. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Three things to watch as Trump reacts to his impeachment
Spokeswoman said president was working rather than watching TV. Then came his tweet

A Trump supporter yells at pro-impeachment demonstrators as they rally in front of the Capitol on Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS — In so many ways, the likely split screen Wednesday evening of the House voting to impeach President Donald Trump as he is on stage at a campaign rally is fitting.

In fact, there will be a certain poetry as the two events coincide — no, collide — in real-time. A special prime time edition of what so often over the last three years has felt like a dramatic made-for-television presidency that has been referred to in this space and others as “The Trump Show.”

In wild Fox News interview, Trump again shows his obsession with 2016 election
President repeats false assertion about ‘Steele dossier,’ says impeachment is backfiring on Democrats

Then-Democratic presidential nominee and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton debates then-Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump in 2016 in Las Vegas. (Win McNamee/Getty Images file photo)

ANALYSIS — For Donald Trump, it may always be 2016.

The president is running for reelection in 2020, but a wild Friday morning television interview showed anew just how laser-focused he remains on things that happened — and that he and right-wing lawmakers and commentators claim went down — three years ago.

Trump comes out swinging, but Fiona Hill fights back in dramatic impeachment finale
Kyiv embassy official says he had ‘never seen anything like’ Sondland cafe call with U.S. president

Fiona Hill, a former National Security Council Russia adviser, testifies before the House Intelligence Committee during a hearing on the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Donald Trump came out swinging Thursday morning, but two witnesses who testified for hours in the impeachment inquiry pulled no punches as they overshadowed the president’s morning attacks.

Testimony by Fiona Hill, a former National Security Council Russia expert, and David Holmes, an official in the U.S. embassy in Kyiv, further undercut several contentions pushed by Trump, GOP lawmakers and the president’s surrogates. Hill, for instance, dismissed a conspiracy theory rejected by American intelligence agencies but espoused by Trump and other Republicans that Ukraine, not Russia, meddled in the 2016 U.S. election.

Trump’s relationships and other takeaways after Gordon Sondland’s testimony
‘The Gordon problem’: Ambassador quips ‘that’s what my wife calls me’ during an odd day in Washington

Gordon Sondland, U.S. ambassador to the European Union, testifies during the House Intelligence Committee hearing on the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS — Donald Trump stuck to the script Wednesday, one he personally wrote on an Air Force One notepad in black marker.

As the president gestured with his hands as he spoke to reporters, the pad in his left hand tilted toward journalists assembled on the White House’s South Lawn. His movements revealed the notes, writing in large letters with what appeared to be a thick black marker. (A White House official confirmed it was the president’s handwriting on the white page.)

Trump contends Sondland clears him
‘I want nothing. That’s what I want from Ukraine,’ POTUS says he told ambassador

President Donald Trump speaks to reporters at the White House on Oct. 10. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Reading from his own marker-written notes and running an hour behind schedule for a trip to Texas, President Donald Trump contended Wednesday that Gordon Sondland’s testimony proves he did not order a quid pro quo with Ukraine’s new president.

In yet another surreal moment of his presidency, Trump appeared to recite a version of a Sept. 9 phone conversation with Sondland that his ambassador to the EU took while sitting on the outdoor patio of a Kyiv restaurant.