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Will the Lone Stars Align for Beto O’Rourke in Texas Senate Race?
Political Theater Podcast, Episode 41

Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke joins Willie Nelson on stage during his Turn out For Texas Rally last month. Other Texas legends are coming out for O'Rourke. How much difference will it make, though? (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Will appealing to Whataburger partisans get out the vote? What about a new Willie Nelson song? These are but some of the questions that will be answered by the Texas Senate race between Republican Sen. Ted Cruz and Democratic Rep. Beto O’Rourke

That’s because some of the Lone Star State’s favorite sons, like country-music legend Nelson and filmmaker Richard Linklater, have come out strong for O’Rourke and are putting their artistic talent where their mouths are. Will it make a difference, though? Leah Askarinam from Inside Elections and McClatchy’s Alex Roarty, who grew up in Houston, discuss the race, whether famous Texans will help O’Rourke and what sort of downstream effect the race has on competitive House races we might see on the latest Political Theater Podcast. 

Opinion: No Holiday in the United States of Exhaustion
Memorial Day week started like any other, with sniping and infighting

Flags were placed at every grave for Memorial Day at the Southern Nevada Veterans Memorial Cemetery in Boulder City, Nev., on Monday. There was little public evidence this Memorial Day of Americans coming together to mend the tears in the nation’s fabric, Curtis writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

In overworked America, with national holidays too few and far between, citizens look forward to each one. Memorial Day, especially, is a time of unity — a day to honor those who have served and sacrificed, without regard to political party or philosophy.

This year, though, that always delicate truce seemed particularly fraught.

Opinion: Hollywood Discovers America!
Roseanne has tapped into the frustrations of many voters

Roseanne Barr has tapped into the frustrations that drove millions to take a risk in the 2016 election, Winston writes. (Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images file photo)

As a matter of preference, television sitcoms rank somewhere behind handyman shows and zombie apocalypse series when it comes to my viewing habits. But like 25 million other Americans last week, I watched the societal/political phenomenon that is “Roseanne.”

For me, watching this working-class family struggle to make ends meet was eerily familiar.

Analysis: After Stormy, Trump Goes Dark
Trump avoiding reporters for second day after porn actress broke silence

President Donald Trump has gone uncharacteristically silent after Stormy Daniels’ “60 Minutes’ interview on Sunday. (Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump has gone dark.

On the first work day after porn actress Stormy Daniels alleged a consenual sexual encounter with then-married businessman and reality television star Trump in 2006 then a payoff to remain silent in the waning days of the 2016 presidential election, Trump stayed out of view of reporters Monday — and out of range of their myriad Stormy questions — on an uncharacteristically quiet day at his White House.

An Environmental Film Festival That Aims for a Big Tent
26th annual confab pitches itself as both mission-driven and entertaining

The 26th annual Environmental Film Festival in the nation’s capital is underway, and runs through March 25. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Maryanne G. Culpepper, executive director of the Environmental Film Festival in the nation’s capital, has a long-standing heads-up for filmmakers who arrive at screenings to talk about their movies. 

“People are going to challenge you with questions. Be sure that you really know your stuff, and don’t try to bluff your way through an answer, because they’ll call you on it,” she says. 

The Newspaperman
Members share memories of Ben Bradlee as HBO biopic premieres in D.C.

Ben Bradlee speaks during a question and answer session at the 30th anniversary screening of “All The President’s Men” in New York in 2005. (Brad Barket/Getty Images file photo)

HBO’s “The Newspaperman: The Life and Times of Ben Bradlee” premieres on the network Dec. 4. Some VIPs in D.C. got a sneak peak Wednesday.

Bradlee guided the paper as it peeled away the layers of the Watergate scandal, which toppled the presidency of Richard Nixon. Reporters Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward told the story in their book “All the President’s Men,” later adapted for the film of the same name. 

New High Court Term, Same No-TV and Tape-Delay Rules
Arguments will be invisible, and hard to hear, even for member of Congress with eyes on landmark redistricting case

Cameras still won’t be allowed in the U.S. Supreme Court and arguments will continue to be on a tape-delay. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Supreme Court term starting next week promises to be among the most consequential in years, but it’s guaranteed to be as invisible as ever to the American citizenry.

The campaign to get cameras in the courtroom has almost totally foundered. Instead, some open-government advocates have started campaigning to simply hear oral arguments in real time  — so far, also with no success.

Word on the Hill: Your D.C. Fourth of July Schedule
Concert, Metro and parking logistics

Prepare for the fireworks on the mall this year. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

So you can plan ahead for this weekend, here is what’s going on in D.C. on the Fourth of July along with some logistical information.

Read HOH’s full Independence Day package, which includes a list of different things to do in the D.C. area, what members do for the holiday and what senators usually do.

Word on the Hill: Comey Time
Seersucker Thursdays begin

D.C. will be watching as former FBI director James B. Comey testifies today. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former FBI director James Comey is heading to Capitol Hill this morning and D.C. is preparing in many different ways.

The Capitol will be hectic leading up to the 10 a.m. hearing. For those outside of the Capitol complex, or able to leave work for a couple of hours, there are a handful of bars in D.C. opening early, pouring cleverly titled drinks, and taking advantage of some great TV.

The Best Places to Watch Comey Hearing
D.C. bars open early for must-see TV

Former FBI director James Comey will be on the big screen on Thursday. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former FBI Director James Comey’s testimony Thursday about what he and President Donald Trump’s conversation about the investigation into Russia’s connections with Trump’s campaign is expected to make for some compelling television.

And some D.C. establishments are firing up their big screens to be the place to watch.