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Mueller report is a reminder that Russian hack hit House races, too
Talks between the DCCC and NRCC about using stolen information stalled in September

The Justice Department on Thursday released special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report on Russian interference in the 2016 election. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report provided new details Thursday about how Russian agents hacked into Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee computers in 2016, renewing the question of whether the two parties would agree not to use stolen material in future political attacks.

Leaders of the DCCC and the National Republican Congressional Committee came close to such an an agreement in late 2018, but talks broke down.

Hey! Robert Mueller relies on CQ
CQ’s transcript service shows up in at least 16 pages of footnotes in Mueller report

Members of the media film a few pages of special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report on Russian interference in the 2016 election, which was printed out by House Judiciary staffers on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Who are you going to call when you need a transcript for official citation in the Mueller report? Why, CQ, of course.

The highly anticipated report by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III released Thursday spans nearly 450 pages, but tucked in the footnotes of at least 16 of them is text from transcripts that are available through CQ.

For serious primary voters, the parade of Democratic candidates is no joke
The contender clown car may be overflowing, but voters definitely aren’t laughing

There are too many Democratic presidential contenders to count, but primary voters aren’t throwing in the towel just yet, Curtis writes. When Beto O’Rourke made his Southern swing last weekend, supporters took the time to explain why he stands out from the field. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The number of Democratic hopefuls declaring, thinking about declaring or being pushed to declare their interest in the 2020 race is increasing so rapidly, it has already become a reliable punchline. But for voters looking to discover the person who offers sensible policies on the issues they care about while exuding the intangible “it” quality that could beat Donald Trump, it is serious business.

Forget about what magic the letter “B” might hold — think Bernie, Biden, Beto, Booker, Buttigieg and I know I’m forgetting someone, oh yes, Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet — these voters are digging deeper on the candidates who will crowd a debate stage in Miami two nights in a row in June.

Louisiana wants some gator aid
A pending ban on alligator products has lawmakers scrambling

An alligator surfaces in a pond near located near the Space Shuttle Discovery as it sits on launch pad 39b at Kennedy Space Center Dec. 8, 2006, in Cape Canaveral, Florida. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

A united Louisiana congressional delegation is lobbying a key California official to try to avert a pending Golden State ban on the “importation, possession or sale of alligator and crocodile products.”

Gators are big business in Louisiana. The state Department of Wildlife and Fisheries estimates alligator harvesting is a $50 million-a-year industry in the state. It says ranchers collect over 350,000 alligator eggs, trappers harvest over 28,000 wild alligators and farmers harvest over 250,000 farm-raised alligators annually.

The bells of Congress, they are a-changin’
Architect of the Capitol eyes replacement ‘legislative call system’ of bells and clocks

The Architect of the Capitol is moving forward with plans to replace the bells and clocks of the legislative call system. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

There’s a new tempo coming to Capitol Hill, as plans move forward to replace the bells and clocks of the legislative call system. That means the familiar buzzes and blinking lights that have ruled the corridors for years could be changing.

The Architect of the Capitol is looking to commission the development, design and installation of a revamped system. It will work alongside the existing network used to alert members of Congress and staff to action on the floor.

Petworth gets juicy, twangy and not ‘too fancy’
Cinder BBQ hopes to become your new favorite hangout

Slaw, brussels sprouts and Gordy’s pickles round out a meal at Cinder. (Clyde McGrady/CQ Roll Call)

Two veterans of the Washington bar and lounge scene are teaming up with a pitmaster to bring barbecue to D.C.’s Petworth area, adding to what they call its “cool neighborhood vibe.” Cinder, which sits among Upshur Street anchors such as Timber Pizza Co. and Himitsu, will open its doors this Saturday, April 13. I caught up with the owners on the eve of the grand opening.Pitmaster Bill Coleman, a retired Marine who favors Doc Cochran from HBO’s “Deadwood,” down to the glasses perched on his nose, spent the last 16 years running a catering business before finally heeding advice from friends Matt Krimm and John Anderson that he needed his own brick-and-mortar restaurant to serve his Texas-style BBQ.

Krimm and Anderson already co-own cigar bars W. Curtis Draper and Civil Cigar Lounge and had been kicking around the idea of owning a restaurant for years. Krimm, shortly after moving to the Petworth neighborhood four years ago, even told his girlfriend that he would do it someday.

The Senate lacks protections for LGBTQ staff. One group is demanding change
Existing laws for legislative branch workers don’t explicitly protect LGBTQ employees

A Senate staffer group is urging offices to adopt policy manuals that include protections for LGBTQ employees from discrimination. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As Congress considers expanding civil rights to encompass LGBTQ Americans, Senate staffers want their bosses to shore up such protections for the congressional workforce itself. 

In a letter sent April 8, the bipartisan Senate GLASS Caucus urged chamber offices to adopt policy manuals that include protections for LGBTQ employees from discrimination.

Kendra Horn still worries about her student loans. She’s not the only one
When the Democrat worked as a Hill staffer, she deferred her loans, brought her dog to work and (yes) sometimes disagreed with her boss

UNITED STATES - MARCH 6: Reps. Kendra Horn, D-Okla., center, Andy Kim, D-N.J., and Chrissy Houlahan, D-Pa., are seen before a House Armed Services Committee hearing titled "Outside Perspectives on Nuclear Deterrence Policy and Posture," in Rayburn Building on Wednesday, March 6, 2019. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Kendra Horn is the new lawmaker no one saw coming. An upset victory in Oklahoma sent her to Washington, but she’s actually been here before.

Back in 2004, between stints as a lawyer and a nonprofit executive, the Democrat briefly served as press secretary for Rep. Brad Carson.

Rep. Matt Gaetz taunts Rep. Adam Schiff with PENCIL Act
GOP congressman’s bill acronym repeats Trump’s insult of Intelligence Committee chairman

Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., named a new bill targeting Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff the PENCIL Act after President Donald Trump called the Democrat “pencil neck.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Matt Gaetz wants to codify one of President Donald Trump’s taunts into federal law.

The Florida Republican filed a bill Wednesday that would boot Rep. Adam Schiff from the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.

Punishment for border wall money transfer could pinch Pentagon
Lawmakers want to remind the White House who holds the power of the purse

When domestic events strain Defense Department accounts, the Pentagon is used to moving money around. But now that the president is testing that time-honored flexibility, Congress is considering a change. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump’s controversial border wall could propel lawmakers to end a time-honored “gentleman’s agreement” that has allowed the Pentagon to shift billions of dollars around in its budget — a move that could hamstring the military’s ability to respond quickly to unforeseen events.

House Democrats are poised to retaliate against Trump’s decision to repurpose Defense Department funds to help pay for the wall along the southern border, and the Pentagon’s budget flexibility seems to be the target.