gops

Kennedy: Free Press Resolution Not a Direct Rebuke of Trump
 

The Senate adopted a unanimous consent resolution on Thursday stating the press "is not the enemy of the people,” a declaration put forth by Democratic Sen. Brian Schatz and Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer. Republican Sen. John Kennedy told Roll Call Thursday afternoon that he’s “always supported freedom of the press.”

Senate Democrats ‘Ready to Sue’ for Kavanaugh Records
Schumer threatens lawsuit against the National Archives

blumenthal_BC_054_081618

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer and Democrats threatened Thursday to file a lawsuit to get access to documents from Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s time in the George W. Bush White House.

At the Races: The Unending Primary Season
Our weekly newsletter on congressional campaigns

AT-THE-RACES-LOGO-01

Welcome to At the Races! You can keep track of House and Senate races with this weekly newsletter by subscribing here. We want to hear what you think. Email us at attheraces@cqrollcall.com with your questions, tips or candidate sightings. — Simone Pathé and Bridget Bowman

Senate, After One Day Back at the Capitol, Packs It In for the Week
Chamber confirmed two circuit court judges and moved to appropriations package

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., runs in the Senate subway basement on Thursday, shortly before senators cast their last votes of the week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senators didn’t exactly extend themselves with the floor schedule for their first week back in session in August, though they did confirm another pair of President Donald Trump’s nominees to be judges on the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals: A. Marvin Quattlebaum Jr. and Julius Ness Richardson. 

Quattlebaum was confirmed Thursday on a 62-28 vote, while Richardson got by on an 81-8 vote. 

1 in 7 Americans Lose Sleep Over Politics, Survey Finds
Younger baby boomers are the most likely age group to toss and turn over political worries

Weary guests wait for President Donald Trump to address the Conservative Political Action Conference at the Gaylord National Resort in Oxon Hill, Md., on Feb. 23. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Suffering from insomnia? Here’s a quick cure: stop caring about politics so much. 

A new study shows that one in seven Americans are so riled up about politics that they’re losing sleep over it, according to a survey conducted for Bankrate.com. That adds up to 34 million people, more than those who lose sleep over health care costs or paying rent.

Corporate PACs in Spotlight as Candidates Reject Their Money
So far, 85 primary winners are rejecting money from corporations

The candidates pledging not to accept corporate PAC money have mostly been Democrats. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Corporate PACs have been thrust into the political spotlight as more Democratic candidates make rejecting corporate money a central theme of their campaigns. Seven of those congressional hopefuls won their primaries Tuesday.

Those results bring the total number of primary winners who are not accepting corporate PAC contributions to 85, according to the group End Citizens United, which supports an overhaul of the campaign finance system. These candidates are instead relying on donations from individuals and other groups.

6 Times Things Got Physical on the Campaign Trail
Davis campaign aide latest to cross the line

Montana Rep. Greg Gianforte posted a public apology to a reporter and pledged to donate $50,000 to the Committee to Protect Journalists after he admitted to body-slamming him the night before a 2017 House special election. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Levi Lovell, campaign field director for Illinois Republican Rep. Rodney Davis, was arrested and charged with aggravated assault after chasing the congressman’s Democratic opponent, Betsy Dirksen Londrigan, around a local bar.

Amid all the heat and pressure of an election year, political disputes hardly ever get physical — until they do.

Aretha Franklin Gets R-E-S-P-E-C-T From Lawmakers
Members of Congress recall personal connections, dedication to civil rights

Aretha Franklin sings during the inauguration ceremony for President Barack Obama on the West Front of the Capitol on Jan. 20, 2009. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As the news of the death of Aretha Franklin circulated, members of Congress recalled their personal connections to the Queen of Soul, as well as her long advocacy of civil rights. 

“What made her talent so great was her capacity to live what she sang. Her music was deepened by her connection to the struggles and the triumphs of the African American experience growing up in her father’s church, the community of Detroit, and her awareness of the turmoil of the South. She had a lifelong, unwavering commitment to civil rights and was one of the strongest supporters of the movement,” Georgia Democratic Rep. John Lewis, a civil rights icon in his own right, said in a statement. 

Free Press Gets a Boost With Senate Resolution Declaring It Is Not the Enemy
Action comes on same day newspapers coordinate on free press message

Sen. Brian Schatz of Hawaii is leading a resolution to defend press freedoms. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate on Thursday went on record declaring “that the press is not the enemy of the people” — a rebuke to President Donald Trump, who declares the opposite on a regular basis. 

Senators adopted by unanimous consent a resolution from Democratic Sen. Brian Schatz of Hawaii and Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer of New York to declare the Senate’s support for a free press and the First Amendment protections afforded to journalists.

Unions Line Up Behind Republican Fitzpatrick in Pennsylvania House Race
Incumbent’s labor support complicates Democrats’ hopes of flipping seat

Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick, R-Pa., here at a 2017 town hall meeting in Bensalem, Pa., has the financial support of high-powered labor groups as he runs for a second term. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In a sign of trouble for Democrats’ hopes of flipping a Pennsylvania House seat, high-powered unions are pledging support for the Republican incumbent in the 1st District in suburban Philadelphia. 

Freshman Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick has raised more than $200,000 from labor groups, dwarfing the $3,000 collected by his Democratic opponent, multimillionaire philanthropist Scott Wallace, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported, attributing the numbers to OpenSecrets.org.