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House Budget Would Direct $302 Billion in 10-Year Spending Cuts
‘Three-step process to give to the rich and make everyone else pay for it,’ Democrats say

Rep. Steve Womack, R-Ark., walks down the House steps after final votes of the week in the Capitol on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Budget Chairman Steve Womack’s fiscal 2019 budget resolution charts a path to balancing the budget in nine years through a combination of steep cuts in mandatory spending programs, freezing nondefense discretionary spending and banking on robust economic growth, according to a summary.

Under the draft fiscal blueprint, which will be marked up in committee Wednesday and Thursday, the deficit would be reduced by $8.1 trillion over 10 years compared to current law or policy. The budget would produce a surplus of $26 billion in 2027 if all of the assumed policies were enacted, growing to $142 billion in 2028.

Word on the Hill: What’s Buzzing on Capitol Hill?
Massie is sassy, Huffman with a burn, and McCain is a proud friend

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

We’re all over Capitol Hill and its surrounding haunts looking for good stories. Some of the best are ones we come across while reporting the big stories.

There is life beyond legislating and this is the place for those stories. We look for them, but we don’t find them all. We want to know what you see, too.

Harley Rouda Takes Slim Lead in Race to Challenge Rohrabacher
Battle between two Democrats to take on vulnerable Republican within 40 votes

The race to challenge Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, R-Calif., is coming down to the wire as final votes are counted from the June 5 primary. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As the final votes are counted in the primary race to challenge California Republican Rep. Dana Rohrabacher in November, 40 votes separate two Democratic candidates.

Harley Rouda, a real estate developer, has taken a razor-thin lead over Hans Keirstead in the narrow fight for second place in the 48th Congressional District, the Los Angeles Times reported.

Democratic Senators Ask if CFPB Nominee Worked on Immigration Policy Separating Children and Parents
Kathy Kraninger's role at OMB involves oversight of DHS and Justice

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., wants to know if President Donald Trump’s nominee to lead the CFPB was involved in drafting the new immigration enforcement policy. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Did President Donald Trump’s nominee to lead the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau approve the administration’s “zero-tolerance” immigration policy that has led to a wave of families being separated near the Southern border?

That is the question posed by Democratic Sens. Sherrod Brown of Ohio and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts to Kathy Kraninger, the program associate director at the Office of Management and Budget whose job includes policy implementation oversight for both the Justice Department and Homeland Security Department, according to the senators.

Here Are the Republicans Opposing Migrant Family Separation
A growing number of GOP legislators are breaking with the Trump administration’s policy

Activists protest against the policy of separating migrant children from their families on Monday in Los Angeles. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Legislators from both parties are raising their voices against the Trump administration policy separating undocumented migrant children from their parents when they cross the southern border.

The policy has garnered intense and unified Democratic opposition, with all 48 of the party’s senators endorsing a bill, proposed by California Sen. Dianne Feinstein, to reverse the policy. A growing number of Republicans also have come out against the current conditions on the border, while largely avoiding placing blame directly on President Donald Trump or his administration.

Steve King Defends Child Detention Centers
Says kids were playing soccer and the facility was air-conditioned when he visited in 2014

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, defended child detention facilities on the border. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican Rep. Steve King defended the detention facilities where child migrants are being held at the border after being separated from their parents.

The Iowa congressman was asked by TMZ about Democrats calling detention facilities “concentration camps” and said he had been down to one of the the facilities in 2014 that was a retrofitted warehouse.

Burgess Heckled At Town Hall About Children at the Border
Responds by blaming countries that migrants are leaving

Republican Rep. Michael Burgess gave multiple non-answer responses when asked about the separation of children and their parents at the border at a town hall in his North Texas district. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican Rep. Michael Burgess was confronted by constituents in a town hall meeting in his North Texas district Monday about the Trump administration’s policy of separating child migrants from their parents at the border.

Speaking at Denton High School, constituents asked him about his stance on undocumented immigrants being separated from their children while they await prosecution, NBC5 reported.

DCCC Raises $11.3 Million in May
House Democrats’ campaign arm has brought in $162 million so far this cycle

DCCC Chairman Ben Ray Luján says Democrats will not be “out-organized or out-worked in the midterms.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee raised $11.3 million in May, exceeding its monthly total at the same point during the last election cycle by more than $3 million. 

The committee raised $3.3 million in total from online donations, according to figures shared first with Roll Call. Democrats say the amount of online donations — which involve 360,000 first-time donors so far this election cycle — are indicative of energy among the party base. 

5 Things to Watch in House Immigration Debate This Week
Trump, leadership, conservatives, moderates, and the Senate are all key players to watch in this GOP exercise

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, was involved in negotiating the GOP’s compromise immigration bill but he has not committed to support it. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans this week will vote for the first time in their running eight-year majority on the divisive issue of legalizing certain undocumented immigrants.

The House is expected to hold Thursday votes on two immigration bills that address the legal status of so-called Dreamers, young undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children, as well as border security and enforcement.