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A Year After Charlottesville, Trump Faces New Questions About Racism
Racism charges resurface in light of feud with ex-aide Omarosa Manigault Newman

President Donald Trump has attacked his former aide Omarosa Maginault Newman as a “lowlife” and a “dog.” (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A year has passed since President Donald Trump was accused of racism after he failed to quickly and unequivocally condemn racially motivated violent protests in Charlottesville, Virginia. But recent claims made by and against his former aide Omarosa Manigault Newman have given new life to those accusations

On Saturday, the one-year anniversary of the Charlottesville violence, Trump tweeted that the riots “resulted in senseless death and division” and called for the nation to come together.

Watch: Sanders Defends Trump's Omarosa Tweets
 

Gary Johnson Mounting Third-Party Bid for New Mexico Senate Seat
Former GOP governor took 9 percent in state as 2016 Libertarian presidential nominee

Former New Mexico Gov. Gary Johnson, the 2016 Libertarian presidential candidate, will run for Senate in New Mexico this November. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Libertarian presidential hopeful Gary Johnson has qualified to run for Senate in New Mexico, according to the secretary of state’s candidate list.

Johnson, who served two terms as New Mexico governor as a Republican, will make a formal announcement on his bid soon, his campaign manager told The Associated Press.

Goodlatte Family Feud Not the First to Befuddle Congress
Between Bernie’s son and the Conyers family, this election cycle has seen some familial discord

Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., doesn’t see eye to eye with his son, as a pointed tweet revealed this week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When Bobby Goodlatte, son of the Virginia congressman by the same name, spoke out this week in defiance of his father, it struck some as odd. But it wasn’t the first family feud to play out in Congress. Here are a few of the ones we’ve seen this year: 

Things got a little awkward for retiring Republican Rep. Robert W. Goodlatte over the weekend, after his son announced he had donated the maximum amount allowed to the Democrat running to replace him.

For Former Felons, Voting Rights Could Be a Click Away
Website aims to help millions of new voters register

A new website launched by an organization dedicated to voting rights could to help former felons navigate confusing voting laws in states like Alabama, where December’s special Senate election was decided by 20,000 ballots. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Millions of new voters could register across the country, starting Tuesday, with the launch of an online tool meant to help former felons restore their right to vote.

The Campaign Legal Center’s website, restoreyourvote.org, attempts to guide users through a sometimes confusing jumble of state laws to determine whether past convictions or unpaid fines would keep them from the ballot box.

A Brief Recap of the George Washington Gavel's Long History
Undercover Capitol takes you inside the historic workplace — one video at a time

Cost Isn’t Everything. Pentagon Should Judge Contractors on Cybersecurity, Report Says
Security would be ‘fourth pillar’ in weapons purchase decisions

Aerial view of the Pentagon building photographed on Sept. 24, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Pentagon should take into account the cybersecurity capabilities of defense contractors in addition to cost and performance measures when awarding contracts, a U.S. government-funded think tank recommended in a report published Monday.

Through its buying process, the Pentagon “can influence and shape the conduct of its suppliers,” the Mitre Corp. said in a report titled “Deliver Uncompromised: A Strategy for Supply Chain Security and Resilience in Response to the Changing Character of War.”

Helped Wanted: New Printer for 2020 Census
GPO solicits new bids after contracting snafu with previous printer

The Census Bureau doesn’t have a printer lined up for the upcoming 2020 Census. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Census Bureau is currently without a printer, less than two years before the national head count begins. That has left the Government Publishing Office to accept new bids for the 2020 census printing contract until Sept 10, after previously awarding the contract to a company that has since filed for bankruptcy.

The GPO intends to award the replacement printing and mailing contract in November. This timeline “will ensure there is no negative effect on the 2020 Printing and Mailing Operation or the overall 2020 Census,” according to a Census Bureau statement earlier this month.

Closing Arguments for Manafort Trial Set for Wednesday, if Jurors Can ‘Pay Attention’
Jury could decide former Trump campaign chairman’s fate as early as that evening

The closing arguments for the trial against former Donald Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort are set for Wednesday. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Closing arguments for the Paul Manafort trial are set to begin Wednesday morning, Judge T.S. Ellis III said in court Tuesday.

The Eastern Virginia jury could decide as early as Wednesday evening whether the former Trump campaign chairman is guilty of any of the 18 counts he is facing on tax evasion and bank fraud.