Speaker Ryan

Trump ignites firestorm during impeachment hearing — with just two tweets
‘Be quiet!’: Agitated president lashes out at reporter‘s questions about tweet

Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney answers questions during a briefing at the White House on October 17. He and other staffers were caught off guard by President Donald Trump's tweet attacking a senior U.S. diplomat as she testified in the impeachment proceeding. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Marie Yovanovitch, the former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine who was fired  by President Donald Trump had just begun her public testimony in House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry. Then came the tweet.

“Everywhere Marie Yovanovitch went turned bad. She started off in Somalia, how did that go? Then fast forward to Ukraine, where the new Ukrainian President spoke unfavorably about her in my second phone call with him,” he wrote. “It is a U.S. President’s absolute right to appoint ambassadors.

One of Government Publishing Office’s most important customers might soon be in charge
Hugh Halpern has confirmation hearing to be GPO director

Hugh Halpern, nominee to serve as director of the Government Publishing Office, testified at the Senate Committee on Rules and Administration on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Not every nominee shows up for a confirmation hearing ready to show off his own personal copy of the House Manual. Then again, not every nominee is Hugh Halpern.

Halpern, the longtime Republican staff director of the House Rules Committee and subsequently director of floor operations for Speaker Paul D. Ryan of Wisconsin, is President Donald Trump’s nominee to run the Government Publishing Office.

Who’s holding the impeachment hearings? Meet the House Intelligence Committee
Backgrounds vary on Intelligence Committee looking at impeachment of Trump

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., right, ranking member Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., center, and Rep. Mike Conaway, R-Texas, prepare for a hearing in September. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Most members of the House Intelligence Committee aren’t household names, but they’re about to be thrust into the national spotlight.

The committee this week begins public hearings in the House’s impeachment inquiry, which is investigating whether President Donald Trump abused his office by withholding military aid to Ukraine in exchange for investigations into his political opponents.

Ending DACA without a legislative solution is bad for Dreamers, bad for our nation and bad politics
7 former GOP congressmen urge their ex-colleagues to act

Dreamers, and those who rely on them, have lived in uncertainty and fear for far too long, former Reps. Coffman, Costello, Curbelo, Dent, Dold, Lance and Trott write. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — While impeachment inquiries rage on and the 2020 race heightens, we need not forget the policy battles we’ve been fighting for years that affect Americans, regardless of immigration status, each and every day.

Since 2012, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program has shielded young immigrants who came to the U.S. as children from deportation, allowing them to legally work or study in the U.S. after completing an application, paying a fee and undergoing a thorough background check. They also have to renew and repeat this process every two years.

Lessons from Kentucky, Mississippi and Virginia elections may not be what you think
Results from 2019 offer some clues about what may work and not work in 2020

President Donald Trump rallied with Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin the night before Bevin’s loss, but that doesn’t mean Trump hurt him. (Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images)

ANALYSIS — Voters in Kentucky, Mississippi, and Virginia were gracious enough to go to the polls on Tuesday and give us some tangible results to chew over with 12 months to go before the 2020 elections. Here are some thoughts.

Kentucky was not an upset. Inside Elections changed its rating on the governor’s race from Lean Republican to Toss-up in mid July after finding Gov. Matt Bevin very vulnerable. So those who were surprised by Democrat Andy Beshear’s declared victory weren’t paying close enough attention.

Decline of local journalism is likely increasing voter polarization
Social media and networks driven by divisive national issues taking over as sources of news

Front pages of newspapers throughout the world are featured outside the Newseum in 2008. With fewer sources of local news and greater access to national media outlets, voters are becoming more polarized. (Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images file photo)

In May 2017, former Republican Rep. Leonard Lance crossed party lines and voted against the GOP health care repeal, a proposal deeply unpopular with voters in New Jersey’s 7th District, which he had represented in Washington for nearly a decade.

A year later, Lance again joined Democrats to oppose the Republican tax cut bill. Although he supported portions of the bill and its overall intent, he decided to vote against it because it would hurt the ability of his wealthiest constituents to deduct the value of their state and local taxes.

Trump brings up impeachment during Nationals White House celebration
President praises players' hair and teases Nats pitcher Sanchez

Washington Nationals pitcher Sean Doolittle was among the players on the World Series championship squad who skipped Monday's visit to the White House. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump almost stuck to the script Monday as the Washington Nationals brought their gleaming World Series championship trophy to the White House. Almost.

House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry was clearly as on his mind after a morning of firing off tweets slamming Intelligence Chairman Adam B. Schiff and the whistleblower who formally raised concerns about Trump’s July 25 phone conversation with Ukraine’s new president.

10 photos from the Nationals Championship Parade in D.C.

(Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Washington Nationals player Ryan Zimmerman hoists the Commissioner’s Trophy as manager Dave Martinez acknowledges the crowd Saturday during a parade on Constitution Avenue to celebrate the World Series champions.

Pitcher Stephen Strasburg boards a double-decker bus with his daughter at the start of the parade.

Three things to watch when World Series champions Nationals visit White House
Will Trump address that ‘Lock him up!’ chant from Game 5 in D.C.?

Washington Nationals first baseman Ryan Zimmerman hoists the Commissioner's Trophy as the team celebrates beating the Houston Astros in Game 7 of the World Series at Minute Maid Park on Wednesday. (Jonathan Newton/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

The Washington Nationals are headed to the White House on Monday, broken World Series trophy and all, to celebrate their first championship in franchise history with President Donald Trump.

Bang! Zoom!

Is tight Kentucky governor’s race a sign of trouble awaiting McConnell in 2020?
Competitive red state excites Democrats, but GOP says no comparison between Bevin and Senate leader

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin stand during the National Anthem at the 2016 Fancy Farm Picnic in Fancy Farm, Ky. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Shortly before Kentucky Gov.  Matt Bevin won his first term four years ago, he made an elaborate show of contrition to onetime rival and fellow Republican Mitch McConnell, showing a satirical video at a GOP dinner in which Bevin appeared to get a McConnell-themed tattoo.

Now Bevin is in the homestretch of a bitter reelection battle — against the state’s Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear — that is seen as a curtain raiser to McConnell’s own 2020 campaign for a seventh Senate term. And the Senate majority leader has been returning the love, working behind the scenes to boost his erstwhile antagonist, according to sources familiar with the race.