2010 Health Care law

Podcast: Trump Kneecapping Obamacare Adds to Year-End Spending Hurdles
Budget Tracker Extra, Episode 35

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., walks back to his office after speaking to reporters on Oct. 3, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Health care, border wall funding and legislation for Dreamers and an assortment of other issues are piling up and likely to complicate efforts for a year-end spending deal to avert a partial government shutdown, says CQ Budget reporter Jennifer Shutt.

 

Capitol Ink | Quick Draw

Capitol-Ink-09-27-17

Hill Flounders on Kids’ Care
Congress’ failure to extend a popular insurance program leaves millions of children at risk of losing health care

A girl is examined by a physician’s assistant in Aurora, Colo. (John Moore/Getty Images)

Minnesota officials knew they would exhaust Children’s Health Insurance Program money by the end of this year. Then they discovered the news was worse: The state would likely be out of money for coverage of low-income children and pregnant women by the end of September. And it became increasingly clear that Congress was probably not going to meet a deadline to help.

The state will have “to take extraordinary measures to ensure that coverage continues beyond October 1, 2017, if Congress does not act,” warned Minnesota Department of Human Services Commissioner Emily Piper in a Sept. 13 letter pleading with lawmakers for “urgent” action.

Capitol Ink | Jimmy Kimmel Test

Capitol-Ink-09-25-17

How Graham-Cassidy Stacks Up, in One Chart
Comparing the Senate GOP's latest plan, and the House-passed option, to current law

Senate leadership talks with reporters in the Capitol after the policy luncheons on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate leaders are considering an attempt next week to pass a repeal of the 2010 health care law, while chamber rules still allow for a 50-50 vote option. Sens. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., and Bill Cassidy, R-La., put together a proposal — after the chamber considered and rejected multiple other options this summer — that they hope will get the repeal over the finish line.

Podcast: Trump and GOP Lawmakers at Odds
The Week Ahead, Episode 64

The demise of the Republican health care bill has added to a growing list of disagreements between President Donald Trump and Republicans in Congress, from the future of Attorney General Jeff Sessions to Russia sanctions to transgender people serving in the military. Is the relationship breaking down? CQ Roll Call White House reporter John T. Bennett and Defense reporter John M. Donnelly explain.

CBO: Latest GOP Health Care Bill Could Lead to 22M More Uninsured
Despite tweaks, Congressional Budget Office notes little change from prior versions

Protests continued around Capitol Hill this week as Senate Republicans attempt a last-ditch effort to save their legislation to overhaul the U.S. health insurance system. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

An updated version of the Republican plan to overhaul the U.S. insurance system would lead to an additional 22 million uninsured individuals over the next 10 years, according to an analysis released Thursday by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office. 

It would also increase premium costs by 20 percent in 2018 and 10 percent in 2019, before lowering them by 30 percent in 2020. It would reduce the federal deficit by $420 billion, the budget office said. 

Senate Health Care Failure Prompts Republican Soul Searching
Onus falls to Mitch McConnell to unite GOP conference

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, seen here Tuesday with Majority Whip John Cornyn, is facing questions over his strategy used in crafting the health care bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell employed an iron fist over the Republican health care effort, keeping top lieutenants in the dark about key decisions and withholding detailed policy information from the conference as a whole until just before it was released publicly.

Now with the seven-year effort to gut the 2010 health care law in tatters, it falls on the Kentucky Republican to deal with the aftermath, and quell concerns about whether he can continue to lead effectively. 

Capitol Ink | Energizer Mitch Bunny

Medicaid Still Key Sticking Point in GOP Health Debate
Additional changes impacting the entitlement program are under consideration

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, is one of several GOP members who have not yet publicized their position on the revised bill to repeal and replace the 2010 health law. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Just hours after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellunveiled an updated bill to overhaul the U.S. insurance system, lawmakers hesitant about the proposed changes to Medicaid huddled in the Kentucky Republican’s office in search of a solution.

The members, which included Sens. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, John Hoeven of North Dakota, Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia and Rob Portman of Ohio, were also joined by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Administrator Seema Verma.