2014

This 2014 House Race May Have Predicted Trump’s Success
Illinois district revealed an angry electorate when it flipped into GOP hands last cycle

The same people attracted to GOP Rep. Mike Bost are also attracted to Donald Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sixteen months ago, no one predicted Donald Trump would become the favorite for the Republican presidential nomination. But back in 2014, a seemingly random Illinois House race should have been an early indicator of an angry electorate that would be receptive to the billionaire businessman’s anti-establishment profile and message.

Republican Mike Bost gained national attention last election cycle for a video of him ranting on the Illinois House floor, which fueled Democratic optimism about holding the seat in the face of a challenging political climate.

‘14 Losers Looking for Second Chance in ‘16
A dozen House candidates hoping to turn narrow losses into future victories

Illinois Democrat Brad Schneider is running against Rep. Robert Dold to reclaim his old seat. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In sports and in politics, losing by a little can be harder than losing by a lot. At least a dozen 2016 candidates are hoping that their close calls in 2014 were more than a mirage of a missed opportunity.  

California Republican Paul Chabot could barely get national GOP strategists to acknowledge his existence last cycle when he lost to Democrat Pete Aguilar, 52-48 percent, in the 31st District open-seat race.  

Academics Say Higher Education Prepared Them for Higher Office

Economics professor Brat said his 20-minute stump speeches played well with voters because they recognized his genuine concern. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

When sociology professor John Trammell ran for Congress in 2014, he was "amazed" by how well prepared he was to be a politician.  

Public speaking, prolific writing, research, the internal politics of higher education and the experience of being critiqued through peer review — all were skills applicable both in the ivory tower and in politics.  

At Final Stakeout Before Election, Senate Leaders Bullish on Chances (Video)

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

At what's expected to be their final appearances before the cameras in the Ohio clock corridor before the midterm elections in November, the two political strategists leading the Senate offered predictably upbeat assessments for their respective parties' chances.  

"If the election were today, we would be just fine. The election's not today, it's 48 days away," Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said — not long after his Republican counterpart Mitch McConnell of Kentucky expressed optimism the electorate would go their way.  

Cruz to House GOP: Punt Spending Debate Into 2015

(Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Ted Cruz is launching an effort to push the House into a continuing resolution that funds the government into the next Congress.  

"It would be a serious mistake for House Republicans to pass a Continuing Resolution that would ensure that Harry Reid and the Senate Democrats would come back to Washington, after many of them will have likely lost their seats, for a no-holds barred lame duck session where they will be free to pass legislation that the American people will never be able to hold them responsible for," the Texas Republican said in a statement provided to CQ Roll Call.  

Ruben Gallego Seeks Arizona's 7th District (Video Interview)

[field name=iframe]  

State Rep. Ruben Gallego, an Arizona Democrat, said he's unsure how much money he'll need to succeed retiring Rep. Ed Pastor, D-Ariz., in the 7th District, according to an interview with CQ Roll Call. "It's hard to say," Gallego said. "It's not going to be a cheap race. This is a five month race."  

Vote on Controversial Nominee Exposes Political Risk of Nuclear Option

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Likely fearful of attack ads, seven Senate Democrats joined Republicans on Wednesday to block the nomination of Debo P. Adegbile to be the next assistant attorney general for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice.  

Three of those Democrats — Chris Coons of Delaware, Mark Pryor of Arkansas and John Walsh of Montana — are on the ballot this fall. The others either had regional ties to the controversy dogging Adegbile or are from red states. Sens. Bob Casey, D-Pa. voted against cloture, as did Democrats Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota, Joe Donnelly of Indiana and Joe Manchin III of West Virginia.  

Democrats Take Aim at Ryan Budget Senate GOP Doesn't Want

With few remaining options for enacting major public policy before the November election, Democrats instead are looking to set a political trap for Republicans on income inequality issues and hoping the GOP takes the bait.  

According to several sources, some Republicans, especially on the Senate side, are reluctant to have House Budget Committee Chairman Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., push forward with his annual budget framework, which he telegraphed this week would focus on the federal government's antipoverty programs. Senate Republicans, several of whom are caught between primary challengers on the right and Democratic upstarts on the left, would rather talk about something else, as opposed to being forced to contend with issues better suited to the Democratic party line.  

Democrats: Obamacare 'Horror Stories' Will Be Disproved

Stabenow is helping lead a Democratic defense of Obamacare. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Democrats are pushing back against "horror stories" from individuals who contend they've faced dire consequences from the implementation of Obamacare, saying they'll be revealed as untrue.  

"All of them are untrue. But they're being told all over America," said Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., during a floor speech, criticizing the Koch brothers for what he considers false attacks.  

Collins, Murkowski Most Likely Republicans to Back Obama

(Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Sens. Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska held their reputations as leading GOP moderates in 2013.  

In CQ Roll Call's annual look at voting records , the two Republican women led the field of those most likely to vote with President Barack Obama on votes on which the administration clearly took a position, either through a formal Statement of Administration Policy or other expression of policy view.