Amy Klobuchar

Wasserman Schultz Marks 10 Years Since Breast Cancer Diagnosis
Florida Democrat shares what her “cancer-versary” milestone means to her

Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz shows a softball signed by participants in the Congressional Women's Softball Game. (Bian Elkhatib/ CQ Roll Call)

Dec. 7 is no ordinary day for Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz. On this day in 2007, the Florida Democrat was diagnosed with breast cancer.

“Dec. 7th for me is always emotional but having reached 10 years since I was diagnosed, which is the milestone for any cancer survivor — it’s your cancer-versary — it’s pretty overwhelming,” she said.

The Strange Day of Senate Farewells
Franken, Strange speeches were very different scenes

Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., and his wife Franni, leave the Capitol on December 7, 2017, after Franken announced on the Senate floor that he will resign his seat. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Thursday became departure day in the Senate, with back-to-back farewell speeches oddly linked due to the recent wave of allegations about sexual harassment.

Staffers and visitors, along with members of the media, filled the Senate chamber Thursday morning for Sen. Al Franken’s announcement that he would in fact resign his seat in the aftermath of an ever-increasing number of sexual harassment allegations.

Ratings Change: Franken Steps Down Amid Allegations, Seat Starts Likely Democratic
Minnesota Senator resigns after colleagues call for his exit

Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., and his wife Franni, leave the Capitol on Thursday, after Franken announced on the Senate floor that he will resign his seat. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Al Franken’s resignation puts another Democratic seat into the 2018 mix, but it’s still unclear whether his departure provides Republicans with a legitimate takeover opportunity.

To handicap a race, it’s helpful to know where the contest will take place and who is running. In this case, we know the place is Minnesota, where, despite Donald Trump’s surge in the Midwest, Hillary Clinton narrowly prevailed in 2016, 46-45 percent, and where Republicans haven’t won a Senate race since Norm Coleman’s 2-point victory in 2002.

Franken Makes Democrats Remember ‘Minnesota Massacre’
Botched 1976 Senate pick led to Democratic-Farmer-Labor party being swept from top offices two years later

Embattled Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., is expected to make an announcement about his future on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton will reportedly appoint Lt. Gov. Tina Smith to replace Sen. Al Franken, who is expected to announce his resignation today.

Sources told the Minnesota Star-Tribune that Smith is the likely choice to fill Franken’s seat before a special election in 2018.

What Happens to Franken’s Seat If He Resigns?
Governor would appoint placeholder, followed by special election in November 2018

There could be two Senate elections next fall in Minnesota instead of just one. If Sen. Al Franken steps down, there would be a special election for the remainder of his term. Senior Sen. Amy Klobuchar’s seat is also up next year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Minnesota Sen. Al Franken isn’t up for re-election until 2020. But if he announces his resignation Thursday, the North Star State will be holding two Senate elections next fall.

Ahead of next November, though, not much would shift in the Senate. If Democratic-Farmer-Labor Gov. Mark Dayton appoints another Democrat immediately, the balance of power in the Senate would remain unchanged.

Klobuchar Assumes Sponsorship of Franken Sexual Assault Bill
Franken’s office had worked on bill with rape victim

Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., has taken over a bill from Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., that would provide grants to law enforcement to train them how to question victims of sexual assault and other abuse. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Amy Klobuchar has assumed the sponsorship of a bill set to be introduced by fellow Minnesota Democrat Sen. Al Franken that would provide training grants for law enforcement personnel that questions victims of sexual assault and other abuse.

Franken’s office worked with 22-year-old Abby Honold to craft the bill. In 2014, Honold was raped by another student at the University of Minnesota, Daniel Drill-Mellum, a one-time intern for Franken.

Sen. Al Franken Accused of Sexual Misconduct
‘He mashed his lips against mine and aggressively stuck his tongue in my mouth’

Minnesota Sen. Al Franken is facing allegations of sexual misconduct. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

UPDATED 11/16/17 2:04 p.m. | A Los Angeles radio news anchor accused Sen. Al Franken of groping and kissing her without consent in an open letter Thursday on the radio station’s website.

Leeann Tweeden, a 790 KABC morning host, wrote that she was on a 2006 USO tour with the Minnesota Democrat, and the former Saturday Night Live cast member had written material for a joint sketch that involved a kiss. Franken insisted on rehearsing, she said.

Opinion: Now McConnell Believes the Women
Comments in response to allegations against Roy Moore

Alabama Republican Senate nominee Roy Moore, is questioned by the media in the Capitol on October 31, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Republicans are suddenly grossed out by their Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore and his conduct 30 years ago, when five women say he either sexually assaulted them, sexually harassed them, or simply tried to date them when he was a single deputy district attorney in his 30s and they were teenagers, one as young as 14 years old.

Moore has completely denied the accusations, but did allow in an interview with Sean Hannity that if he had ever dated a teenager when he was in his 30s, he would only have done it “with the permission of her mother.”

Mandatory by January: Sexual Harassment Training for Senators and Staff
House lawmakers have introduced similar legislation

Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., sponsored a resolution that requires senators and their staffs to complete sexual harassment training by early January. Here, staffers line up at a committee hearing. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senators and their staffs have until early January to complete sexual harassment training, made mandatory by a resolution the Senate adopted unanimously Thursday.

The resolution comes after recent scrutiny of how Congress handles sexual harassment in its offices. Nearly 1,500 former staffers have signed a letter to congressional leadership released Thursday saying the processes are “inadequate and need reform.”