Apple

Capitol Ink | An Apple for the Teachers

Lawmakers Criticize Europe for Going After Apple's Back Taxes
Calls to make U.S. tax system more attractive for multinational corporations

Photographers take iPhone photos of Apple CEO Tim Cook during a 2013 Senate hearing on offshore profit shifting and charges that Apple was avoiding taxes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A bipartisan group of lawmakers accused European authorities of a money grab by seeking more than $14.5 billion in back taxes from Apple Inc.'s Ireland operations, and some are using the case to call for a tax overhaul.

The European Commission concluded Tuesday that Ireland should recover 13 billion euros in “unpaid taxes” — plus interest —from the tech giant's operations in the country.

Apple, Google and Facebook Want More From Next POTUS
Open letter calls for trans-Pacific trade deal and tech initiatives

Trade groups representing thousands of tech companies like Google are calling on the presidential candidates to support more tech-friendly policies. (Shawn Collins/Flickr)

In an open letter to presidential candidates, 13 tech trade groups representing thousands of companies, including Silicon Valley giants Apple, Facebook and Google, outlined for the first time a technology policy agenda they’d like to see parties adopt, including backing the trans-Pacific trade deal .  

Among other things, the letter calls on candidates to “advance ambitious initiatives to reduce barriers to trade in digital and other goods and services, including obtaining the congressional authorization of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement.”  

Obama Backs iPhone Searches, But Not ‘Willy-Nilly’ Access
Certain Criminal Cases Should be the Exceptions

Obama, at the SXSW event in Austin, Texas, weighs in on the dispute over iPhone searches in criminal cases.  (Photo by Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for SXSW)

President Barack Obama believes law enforcement should be able to force Apple to unlock iPhones when investigating certain criminal cases, but he cautioned against “willy-nilly” searches of mobile devices.  

Obama’s comments were among his most substantive on the ongoing debate about Apple’s dispute with the Justice Department, which wants the technology behemoth to unlock an iPhone used by one of the shooters in last year's mass workplace killing in San Bernardino, Calif. His administration has been trying to help bring about a resolution, but so far as failed to do so.  

Obama Backs iPhone Searches, But Not 'Willy-Nilly' Access

   

President Barack Obama believes law enforcement officials should be able to force Apple to unlock iPhones when investigating certain criminal cases, but he cautioned against “willy-nilly” searches of mobile devices.