Black History Month

Black History Month: Tim Scott on What His Election Meant, and What Obama's Election Meant to His Grandfather
Roll Call's series with lawmakers and Capitol Hill figures continues

South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott says he stands on the “shoulders of giants who paid such a high price so that I could represent … the entire state.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Tim Scott sees a lot of progress in his election and the election of the first African-American president more than eight years ago. Both show “what’s possible,” he said. 

Roll Call’s series of interviews with lawmakers and Capitol Hill figures during Black History Month continues with our discussion with the South Carolina Republican.

Black History Month: Senate Chaplain Reflects on Rosa Parks and Being the First African-American in Role
Roll Call's series with lawmakers and Capitol Hill figures continues this week

Senate Chaplain Barry C. Black, the first African-American to hold the post, is interviewed in the Capitol by Roll Call in January. (CQ Roll Call)

For Senate Chaplain Barry C. Black, this month is an “important reminder.” Roll Call’s series of interviews with lawmakers and Capitol Hill figures continues with a step away from politics during a sit-down with this nonpartisan fixture of the Senate — the first African-American to hold the role. 

Watch more interviews and the video, “Black History and America’s Capitol,” which combines all these talks, at rollcall.com/black-history-month. Black’s full discussion with Roll Call is below.

Celebrating Black History Month With Added Resonance
Obama retirement, record number of black lawmakers mark 2017

Former President Barack Obama's departure from the East Front of the Capitol on Jan. 20 was a bittersweet moment for African-American members of Congress. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Black History Month this year has taken on an added resonance, reflected in the record number of African-Americans in Congress.

In the Senate, it has been a long buildup to the current high-water mark of three members: Republican Tim Scott of South Carolina and Democrats Cory Booker of New Jersey and Kamala Harris of California. 

Black History and America’s Capitol
 

This February, Black History Month marks its 41st year as a monthlong tradition. Explore the history of this reflective and celebratory time with lawmakers and other Capitol Hill figures who discuss the intersection of black history and the U.S. Capitol building and its surrounding city.

Black History Month: Cedric Richmond on the ‘Work to Do’ Ahead
CBC chairman says promises of King, Chisholm haven’t yet been fulfilled

Louisiana Rep. Cedric L. Richmond speaks with New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker after the two, along with Georgia Rep. John Lewis, testified last month against the nomination of Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions to be attorney general on the grounds of his civil rights history. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

For Congressional Black Caucus Chairman Cedric L. Richmond, this month is about teaching. First celebrated in 1926 as a weeklong tribute to black history and culture and expanded to a monthlong honor in 1976, Black History Month is a time of reflection and festivity for many African-Americans. Roll Call interviewed Richmond and several other lawmakers and Capitol Hill figures, such as Senate Chaplain Barry C. Black, to find out what the intersection of black history and life in Congress and the Capitol building itself means to them.

Watch interviews and the video, “Black History and America's Capitol,” which combines all these talks, at rollcall.com/black-history-month. Richmond’s full discussion with Roll Call is below.