Bradley Byrne

The X-Factor in the Alabama Senate Race
Republicans who don’t support Roy Moore could make it a close race

Alabama Democrat Doug Jones, center, accompanied by New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker and Alabama Rep. Terri A. Sewell in Birmingham on Sunday, has tried to appeal to GOP voters in his Senate race against Republican Roy Moore. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

PRATTVILLE, Ala. — For Democrat Doug Jones to win a Senate race in Alabama, he needs some help from voters like 74-year-old Don Jockisch.

“I don’t know,” Jockisch, a Republican, said when asked whom he will support in Tuesday’s election, when Jones faces Republican Roy Moore, the former chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court.

Congress Being Congress: Funding Fight Kicked to Later in December
Shutdown threat this weekend averted, but after Dec. 22, the odds go up

Sen. Richard C. Shelby, R-Ala., a senior appropriator, thinks defense funding could be a vehicle for GOP priorities. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Even as President Donald Trump said Wednesday that a government shutdown “could happen,” Congress is on track to pass a two-week continuing resolution to avoid just that.

But after that stopgap, there are no guarantees. Republicans are working on a strategy that appears designed to test Democrats’ resolve to pick a fight over their spending priorities.

Why Moore’s Money Mismatch Might Not Matter
Some Republicans are confident former judge still has edge over Doug Jones

Democrat Doug Jones holds a significant cash advantage over Roy Moore in the Alabama Senate special election. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Democratic Senate candidate Doug Jones has financially overwhelmed his Republican opponent Roy Moore but all his money may not make a difference in the Alabama Senate special election.

Allegations of sexual misconduct against Moore rocked the race, initially boosting Jones’ fundraising and standing in the polls. But polling numbers have tightened in recent days. With the Dec. 12 election roughly a week away, both campaigns are making their final cases to voters for the seat vacated by former Sen. Jeff Sessions, now the attorney general. 

Hot Start With Trump 'Pep Rally' Burns Out as Tax Bill Cruises
Before passing tax bill, GOP members gush about president

President Donald Trump, accompanied by his chief of staff John Kelly, arrives at the Capitol to speak to House Republicans before a floor vote on a GOP-crafted tax overhaul bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Two fireplaces outside the House chamber told the story Thursday a few minutes before members streamed in to vote on a sweeping tax bill. Orange embers were still just visible in both beneath scorched logs and ash. For Republicans, what had started with a white-hot visit by President Donald Trump ended with the anti-climactic passage of their tax plan.

But there was nothing anti-climactic a short time earlier in the basement of the Capitol, where House GOP members gather weekly as a group. They scurried in — mostly on time, with a few notable exceptions — for the presidential visit, and many emerged just before noon strikingly giddy about the scene during the president’s roughly 20 minutes of remarks.

Mo Brooks Stands By Roy Moore in Alabama Senate Race
Brooks thinks the Senate needs Moore’s vote

Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks isn’t backing away from Roy Moore. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks is standing by GOP Senate nominee Roy Moore, arguing that the Senate needs Moore’s vote. 

“There are major issues facing the United States of America — deficit and debt that can lead to insolvency and bankruptcy, funding for national security, border security, abortion, appointment of Supreme Court justices. Doug Jones will vote wrong on each of those issues,” Brooks said Monday night after House votes. “Roy Moore will vote right; that’s why I’m voting for Roy Moore.”

Why Scott Taylor Is Worried About Trump
Republican congressman says Democrats’ strong showing in Virginia is referendum on administration

Reps. Charlie Dent, R-Pa., left to right, Scott Taylor, R-Va., and Bradley Byrne, R-Ala., leave a meeting of the House Republican Conference last month. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican Rep. Scott Taylor didn’t mince words when he said a wave of Democratic victories in Virginia were a “referendum” on the Trump administration and it could be because it spells trouble him next year.

Democratic Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam won the gubernatorial race and a number of Democratic challengers beat incumbent Republicans to win seats in the House of Delegates.

Murphy Says Key to Success Is Good Heels and Running Shoes
Florida Democrat shares what makes her a ‘mom boss’

Murphy stretches during her morning run, with the Capitol in the background. (Bian Elkhatib/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Stephanie Murphy typically takes a run down the National Mall as the sun is rising over the Capitol. A few hours later, she is there in high heels walking to votes.

In her first term in Congress, the 39-year-old Florida Democrat calls herself a “mom boss.” The term comes from the 2016 book “Mom Boss: Balancing Entrepreneurship, Kids & Success” by Nicole Feliciano and is something of a movement, with women adding the hashtag #MomBoss to online discussions of how they balance children and work.

Alabama Senate Race Shifts Into General Election Mode
National party organizations are watching the race to determine involvement

Judge Roy Moore campaign worker Maggie Ford collects campaign signs after a candidate forum. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The campaigns on opposite sides of the Alabama Senate race are starting to gear up for a general election, as the national parties are watching to see if they will get involved.

Democrats acknowledge their candidate, former U.S. Attorney Doug Jones, faces an uphill climb to victory in the Republican state. One Jones adviser said more resources would help, but that GOP nominee, former state Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore, has has been even more helpful to their cause.

Sen. Roy Moore? What the GOP Can Expect
Controversial former judge could be Alabama’s next senator

Roy Moore won the Alabama GOP primary runoff Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

If Roy Moore becomes Alabama’s next senator, he can bring his gun to the Capitol, but it can’t be loaded and must be securely wrapped.

The gun-toting, Bible-quoting, conservative firebrand will likely shake up the Senate whether he can wave his firearm around or not.

Moore Wins Senate GOP Runoff in Alabama
Trump backing fails to translate into win for Strange

Judge Roy Moore won the Tuesday runoff. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Roy Moore, a former chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court, has won the Republican runoff in the Alabama Senate race and will face Democrat Doug Jones in a Dec. 12 general election.

With 92 percent of precincts reporting, Moore led incumbent Sen. Luther Strange, 55 percent to 45 percent, The New York Times reported. Strange was appointed to the seat in February after former Sen. Jeff Sessions became the U.S. attorney general.