Brendan F Boyle

Think Your Thanksgiving Is Lively? These 4 Siblings All Work in Congress
Republicans. Democrats. Turkey bacon. Welcome to a Hervig family feast

From left, Angela Hervig, Daniel Hervig, Janelle Relfe, her husband Mitch Relfe, and Mary Beth Hervig. All of them work on the Hill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

What has four siblings, two parties and five careers at the Capitol?

The Hervig family. And don’t even get them started on Thanksgiving.

Politicians Worry About Millennials, but They’re Already Running the Hill
What happens when the chief of staff is mistaken for the intern

Joe Hack became chief of staff to Sen. Deb Fischer, R-Neb., at 27. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Joe Hack sat in a weekly lunch for Republican chiefs of staff and listened to a speech on what to do about millennials.

At the time, he was 27 and running Nebraska Sen. Deb Fischer’s office. “I’m at a table with a bunch of graybeards, [and] they’re moaning at the trials and tribulations of this next generation. I’m kind of sitting there. All of a sudden it dawns on them that I’m one of them,” he said.

Democratic Candidates Walk Political Tightrope on Drug Prices
Pharmaceutical industry employs many potential voters in some districts

Making the cost of prescription drugs an issue may be complicated for Democrats running in areas that are big pharmaceutical hubs. (John Moore/Getty Images file photo)

Democrats working to regain control in Congress this fall are making the cost of prescription drugs a centerpiece of the party’s message. The path to a majority, however, runs through some places where the pharmaceutical industry employs a lot of potential voters.

Southern California, New Jersey, and the Philadelphia suburbs are among the areas where Democrats have the strongest chances to turn red House seats blue. Yet since these states are some of the biggest pharmaceutical hubs in the United States — the industry estimates it directly employs 44,000 people in Pennsylvania, 65,000 people in New Jersey, and 131,000 in California — candidates there tread a little more cautiously on the issue of drug prices.

Bipartisan Group Wants Labs to Disclose Where Research Animals End Up
Federal agencies asked for info on adoptions and retirements for dogs, cats and primates that survive experiments

Rep. Erik Paulsen, R-Minn., led a bipartisan group of lawmakers in sending a letter to federal agencies about testing on dogs, cats and primates. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Update 10:12 a.m. | A bipartisan group of lawmakers urged federal agencies and research labs to release information on what it does with cats, dogs and primates that survive experiments.

The letter first obtained by Roll Call was sent to the Department of Interior, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Veterans Affairs, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Food and Drug Administration, the Smithsonian Institution, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Department of Defense.

It’s Not Personal, It’s Baseball
Republicans and Democrats take the field Thursday for the annual Congressional Baseball Game

House Chaplain Patrick J. Conroy, left, leads the Republican and Democratic teams in a moment of prayer before the start of last year’s Congressional Baseball Game. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s time to play ball.

The 57th annual Congressional Baseball Game for Charity, pitting Republican lawmakers against the Democrats, starts at 7:05 p.m. Thursday at Nationals Park.

Democrats Offer Eagles Alternatives After Trump Uninvites Them
President falsely claims some players knelt during national anthem

Sen. Bob Casey, Jr., D-Pa., invited the Philadelphia Eagles to the Capitol after President Donald Trump pulled their invitation to visit the White House this week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democratic lawmakers from Pennsylvania were quick to extend invitations to the Super Bowl Champion Philadelphia Eagles to visit the Capitol after President Donald Trump pulled their invitation to the White House over the false notion some members of the team did not stand for the national anthem before games last season.

Contrary to the president’s statement Monday, no members of the Eagles stayed in the locker room or knelt during the national anthem before games last year, CNN anchor and Philadelphia native Jake Tapper reported.

New Faces on the Field for Congressional Baseball Game
Some veterans will be playing in the final game on June 14

Republican manager Rep. Joe L. Barton, R-Texas, right, talks with Democratic team manager Mike Doyle, D-Pa., before the 50th annual Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park in July 2011 (Tom Williams/Roll Call file photo)

Both Democratic and Republican teams have new faces on their rosters for the Congressional Baseball Game on June 14, while a few familiar stalwarts are getting ready to say goodbye.

The Democrats, reigning champions after their 8-2 win last year, have just one new addition — Freshman California Rep. Jimmy Gomez, whose district includes Dodger Stadium.

The Political Turnpike Runs Through Pennsylvania
Resignations, retirements and redistricting scramble the midterm calculus

POLITICALTHEATER-crop

The spectacle of politics and how it fits, or doesn’t, into the nation’s culture. Subscribe to our newsletter here.

If you’re confused about what comes next in Pennsylvania, even after this week’s primary elections set the midterm slate, don’t worry. That just means you’re paying attention. 

Ryan Mocked for Ousting of House Chaplain
Comes amid reports Conroy was ousted because of prayer over tax overhaul debate

Rev. Patrick J. Conroy, chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives, blesses the walnut tree planted earlier this month in memory of New York Democratic Rep. Louise Slaughter. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan was roundly mocked on social media amid reports he ousted House Chaplain Patrick J. Conroy because of his prayer on tax policy.

Two members of Congress said a prayer Conroy delivered during the debate about the Republican tax overhaul was the reason Ryan forced Conroy to resign.

One-Tenth of Congress Lists Student Loan Liabilities
‘I don’t understand how young people can become teachers or work in the public service arena’

California Rep. Mark Takano, a House Education member, is still paying back student loans for a 2010 master’s degree from UC Riverside. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The 115th Congress scored as one of the richest ever, but one in 10 lawmakers still holds student loan debt, either personally or for a family member. 

Fifty-three members listed a combined $1.8 million in student loans on their financial disclosures. Twenty-eight of them posted a positive net worth while 25 showed negative net worth in Roll Call’s comprehensive Wealth of Congress project.