budget caps

House Democrats to Leverage Budget Caps Support for Immigration Vote
Minority party wants Ryan to commit to House floor debate on DACA

From left, Connecticut Rep. Rosa DeLauro, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, Democratic Caucus Chairman Joseph Crowley and Minority Whip Steny H. Hoyer hold a news conference on Jan. 19 to blame Republicans for a potential government shutdown. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats are ready to play their trump card.

For months they’ve withheld support for stopgap spending bills in search of a broader budget agreement on lifting the sequestration spending caps and providing a legislative replacement to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program that is scheduled to end March 5.

Why the House Is Voting on Defense Funding a Third Time
Messaging and internal politics lead to another vote on increasing military spending

Speaker Paul D. Ryan and House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, left, reached an agreement with defense hawks such as House Armed Services Chairman Mac Thornberry to hold another vote on fiscal 2018 defense funding. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House vote this week on a stand-alone defense appropriations measure to boost funding for the military serves two primary purposes for Republicans: messaging and peacekeeping.

While the chamber has already twice passed legislation to fund the Pentagon above the fiscal 2018 sequestration budget cap, Tuesday’s vote allows the GOP to continue emphasizing its support for national security.

Podcast: Hoping to Avoid Another Shutdown
CQ Budget, Episode 46

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks during the Senate Democrats press conference following the Senate Democrats' policy lunch. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

10 Issues Congress Faces in January
Budget, DACA, health care, sexual harassment on to-do list

Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell will be among the Hill leaders negotiating deals on a host of major issues confronting Congress in January. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As the second session of the 115th Congress kicks off Wednesday, lawmakers are confronted with a daunting January to-do list full of issues they punted on in 2017.

Typically, January is a slow legislative month leading up to the party caucuses’ annual retreats, where lawmakers formally develop an agenda for the year. House and Senate Republicans will hold a joint retreat from Jan. 31 to Feb. 2 at the Greenbrier resort in West Virginia, and House Democrats will huddle the following week in Cambridge, Maryland.