cabinet

Capitol Ink | Cabinet Cleanup

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Week Ahead Includes Trump Address, Cabinet Confirmations
Zinke’s departure will mark fourth House GOP vacancy

Zinke is expected to resign from his seat after he is confirmed as Interior secretary, creating a fourth House GOP vacancy. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump will dominate the attention on Capitol Hill with his first address to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday, but lawmakers will also keep moving on confirming his Cabinet nominees and rolling back the previous administration’s regulations.

On Monday, the Senate votes to confirm Wilbur Ross as Commerce secretary. Ross, a billionaire investor, was on Trump’s economic advisory council during the presidential campaign. Senators will also vote Monday evening to end debate on Rep. Ryan Zinke’s nomination to be Interior secretary.

Ep. 5: Why Trump’s New Budget Director Should Prepare for a Fight
Budget Tracker Extra

President Donald Trump finally has his budget director Mick Mulvaney in place, but with a daunting agenda it’s unclear how much he can get accomplished, says CQ Budget Tracker Editor David Lerman. Mulvaney faces, among other challenges, an April deadline when government funding expires and the unknown costs of Republican efforts to repeal and replace Obamacare.

Despite Email Flap, Scott Pruitt Confirmed to Head EPA
Court order unsealing records prompted calls to postpone vote

Scott Pruitt was confirmed Friday as the new administrator of the EPA. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate continued powering through its march on Cabinet confirmations, approving on Friday the nomination of Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt to lead the EPA, despite questions surrounding the appropriateness of his contacts with the fossil fuel industry.

Senators voted 52-46 to confirm Pruitt.

House and Senate Preview: Pouncing on Regulations, Obamacare and Considering the Cabinet
 

Confirmation Speculation Swirls in the Senate
Leaders are negotiating whether Cabinet picks can be swiftly confirmed Friday

Defense Secretary nominee James Mattis could be one of the nominees confirmed on Friday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senators’ focus on President-elect Donald Trump’s Cabinet nominees continued Wednesday afternoon, with some attention turning toward which nominees might be confirmed on Friday.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, D-NY., are currently in negotiations over which nominees could be swiftly confirmed. Democrats will need to cooperate to either confirm nominees by unanimous consent or agree to limiting time for their consideration. 

Senate Preview: DeVos and Price Face Skeptical Dems
 

House and Senate Preview: Obamacare Repeal Set Up and Trump Cabinet Hearings

Senators Gear Up for Confirmation Battles
9 of Trump’s Cabinet picks face Senate committees this week

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer is calling for hearings to be delayed if nominees have not filed all their paperwork with the Office of Government Ethics. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll)

Updated 1/9/2017 at 4:50 p.m.

The Senate is moving full steam ahead on President-elect Donald Trump’s Cabinet nominees, and Democrats are clamoring for a fight. 

Obama Touts Record, Sends Trump Message in Farewell Letter
Letter accompanies exit memos from Cabinet secretaries

President Barack Obama takes questions from student journalists at the White House last year. (Getty Images file photo)

The United States is “stronger and more prosperous” than it was on Inauguration Day 2009, President Barack Obama wrote in a letter to the American people, a dispatch that appears to have a message for his successor.

The letter, which will accompany exit memos from each of Obama’s Cabinet secretaries, begins with the 44th president reminding Americans of the challenges he faced when he was sworn in. Obama then ticks off what he sees as his top achievements, from bailing out U.S. automakers to avoiding an economic depression to passing his health care law to killing Osama bin Laden to a historically high high school graduation rate.