Capitol Police

What the Recess Rollback Means for Capitol Hill (and Taxpayers)
Police overtime, food workers, Capitol improvements all affected

The Senate's shortened recess means some big changes for workers on Capitol Hill (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate’s truncated August recess is changing plans on Capitol Hill, but it’s not yet clear how much it will cost taxpayers.

With lawmakers back in their states, the Architect of the Capitol can typically count on a block of weeks to work on projects that might cause disruption if Congress were in session. And the summer recess is usually a prime time for staffers and Capitol Police to schedule vacations. But not this year.

Man With Gun and Ammunition Arrested Near Capitol
Police spotted firearm in car during parking enforcement

Officers spotted what appeared to be a firearm in a parked car near the Capitol and arrested the owner when he returned to his car. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Capitol Police arrested a man with a gun and ammunition in his vehicle near the Capitol Thursday morning.

Robert Wesley Combs, 23, of Monroe, Georgia, has been charged with having an unregistered firearm and unregistered ammunition, Capitol Police said.

Downloadable Guns Would Pose Unique Risk to Capitol, Gainer Says
‘Even the most technologically advanced security cannot neutralize all possible threats,’ Ex-Senate sergeant-at-arms writes

Former Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Terrance W. Gainer says not permanently stopping downloadable plastic guns “will increase the challenges of protecting the security of members of Congress, their staffs and visitors to the Capitol.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 3:26 p.m. | The only person to hold both top law enforcement roles at the Capitol says downloadable plastic guns would pose an added challenge of “detection and defense” for those who protect Capitol Hill.

Terrance W. Gainer, who served as Senate sergeant-at-arms for seven years and before that as the chief of the Capitol Police, said he is a strong supporter of the Second Amendment, but elected officials must recognize the “unique threat downloadable firearms pose to public safety.”

Three Men Arrested for Impersonating Senate Staff
Arrests in Ohio Clock Corridor came 10 minutes after Monday’s final votes

Three men were arrested Monday evening and charged with unlawful entry and impersonating Senate staff. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

U.S. Capitol Police arrested three men Monday evening in the Senate’s Ohio Clock Corridor, charging them with unlawful entry and impersonating Senate staff.

The three men claimed they had left their staff IDs in their office when they were stopped for being in the area without displaying congressional identification, according to a brief summary of the incident Capitol Police released Wednesday.

Podcast: The Capitol Shooting That Changed Everything
Political Theater, Episode 29

Political Theater

July 24, 1998 changed everything on Capitol Hill. The shooting and ensuing deaths of two Capitol Police officers left a scar on the close-knit community and began a ramping up of hardened security around the legislative branch that continues today. Roll Call Senior Editor David Hawkings covered the event, and Roll Call multimedia reporter Thomas McKinless produced a documentary about the episode with fresh eyes. They discuss what they remembered, and what they learned on the latest Political Theater Podcast. 

Listen here: 

McConnell Honors Capitol Police Slain in 1998 Shooting
 

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell remembered on Tuesday morning the two Capitol police officers who died when a shooter entered the Capitol building 20 years ago today.

Shooting of Capitol Police Officers Was Turning Point for Department
20 years later, department has seen budget nearly quadruple as concerns rose

Members of the United States Capitol Police honor guard stand with a wreath during the annual United States Capitol Police memorial service on May 8 honoring the four USCP officers who have died in the line of duty. This year is the 20th anniversary of the deaths of Officer Jacob Chestnut and Detective John Gibson while protecting the U.S. Capitol from a gunman'’s attack on July 24, 1998. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It has been 20 years since a man with a gun walked into the U.S. Capitol and went on a shooting rampage that killed two Capitol Police personnel and set off two decades of hardening security around Capitol Hill.

Security protocols have ramped up everywhere from airports to museums, and much of the change is attributed to the terror attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. But on Capitol Hill, the deaths of Detective John M. Gibson and Officer Jacob J. Chestnut on July 24, 1998, prompted big changes even before the attacks on New York and the Pentagon.

20 Years Ago, a Deadly Shooting in the Capitol Changed Life on the Hill Forever
 

On July 24, 1998, a schizophrenic man with a gun walked into the U.S. Capitol. The ensuing rampage resulted in the deaths of two Capitol police officers, Detective John M. Gibson and Officer Jacob J. Chestnut, who saved the lives of Majority Whip Tom DeLay, his staff and countless others. The incident changed the Capitol community forever, boosting momentum for construction of the Capitol Visitors Center and much of the security we experience today.

Roll Call looked back at that tragic day, speaking to lawmakers, law enforcement and journalists who covered the story.

Watch the GOP Baseball Team Practice For First Time Since 2017 Shooting
 

Man Arrested for Threatening to Murder Rep. Scott Taylor
If convicted Wallace Grove Godwin of Virginia Beach faces up to 10 years in prison

Rep. Scott Taylor, R-Va., was the target of a murder threat by one of his constituents. The man was arrested Friday and faces up to 10 years in prison if convicted. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A 69-year-old Virginia Beach resident was arrested Friday for threatening to murder his congressman, GOP Rep. Scott Taylor

Wallace Grove Godwin is being charged with threatening to murder and assault a U.S. official, a crime that carries a penalty of up to 10 years in prison if convicted, Tracy Doherty-McCormick, acting U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia, and Matthew R. Verderosa, the U.S. Capitol Police chief, announced Friday.