Cedric L Richmond

At the Races: 6 Months to Go
Our weekly newsletter on congressional campaigns

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Welcome to At the Races! You can keep track of House and Senate races with this weekly newsletter by subscribing here. We want to hear what you think. Email us at attheraces@cqrollcall.com with your questions, tips or candidate sightings. — Simone Pathé and Bridget Bowman

Doubleheader: Love and Barragán Balance Baseball and Softball
The two are the only women to play in this year’s Congressional Baseball Game

Utah Rep. Mia Love plays in last year’s Congressional Women’s Softball Game that pits female lawmakers against female journalists. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Two athletic congresswomen decided one game isn’t enough.

Reps. Nanette Barragán of California and Mia Love of Utah will play with their female colleagues against the media in the Congressional Women’s Softball Game. And both are also on their parties’ rosters for the Congressional Baseball Game, which pits Democratic lawmakers against their Republican counterparts.

Take Five: Steve Scalise
Louisiana Republican is working on fielding a ball again ahead of the 2018 Congressional Baseball Game

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., is hoping to start at second base for the 2018 Congressional Baseball Game. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, 52, a Louisiana Republican, talks about preparing for the next Congressional Baseball Game after last year’s shooting, his physical therapy and advice he gives to other victims of gun violence.

Q: Are you doing anything in particular to get in shape for baseball?

Opinion: The Russians — and the Midterms — Are Coming
U.S. elections are vulnerable, and that needs to change

A march near the Kremlin in 2015 honors Russian opposition leader and former Deputy Prime Minister Boris Nemtsov, a fierce critic of President Vladimir Putin who was fatally shot shortly before a major opposition rally. Reps. Bennie Thompson and Robert A. Brady warn against Russian meddling in future U.S. elections. (Alexander Aksakov/Getty Images file photo)

In November 2016, 139 million Americans cast their votes in the wake of a massive Russian cyber-enabled operation to influence the outcome of the presidential election.

The Kremlin spread disinformation through hundreds of thousands of social media posts. Russian agents hacked U.S. political organizations and selectively exposed sensitive information. Russia targeted voting systems in at least 21 states, seeking to infiltrate the networks of voting equipment vendors, political parties and at least one local election board.

Richmond Torches Trump: ‘Irrelevant’ to the NFL
‘Trump’s probably still bitter he couldn’t have a team,’ Black Caucus chairman says

Rep. Cedric Richmond, D-La., right, said President Donald Trump is "irrelevant" when it comes to the NFL. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Congressional Black Caucus Chairman Rep. Cedric L. Richmond said despite Donald Trump’s criticism of black football players kneeling for the National Anthem, the president is “irrelevant” to the NFL.

The Louisiana Democrat was asked by TMZ whether the fact that no NFL players knelt during the National Anthem during the Super Bowl was a win for Trump.

Photos of the Week: Butterfly Protesters, A Gold Medal for Dole and More as Shutdown Cloud Hangs Over D.C.
The week of Jan. 16 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Sen. Richard J. Durbin, D-Ill., is shown on a television monitor questioning Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen during the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House on Thursday passed a continuing resolution to fund the government past midnight on Friday, but the bill has yet to pass the Senate. The shutdown showdown cloud has loomed over Washington this entire week, but life also went on inside the halls of Congress.

Here’s the entire week in photos:

House Judiciary Advances Foreign Lobby Overhaul
Panel Democrats say GOP is moving too quickly on the bill

Ex-lobbyist Paul Manafort, a former Trump campaign chairman, has been charged with violating the Foreign Agents Registration Act. (Win McNamee/Getty Images file photo)

House Republicans took a significant step Wednesday in an effort to overhaul the nation’s foreign lobbying disclosure regulations amid scandals in the influence sector.

The House Judiciary Committee advanced as amended, 15-6 along party lines, the measure that would give the Justice Department new subpoena-like investigative powers. That new authority sparked controversy among the panel’s Democrats.

Trump Denies Using Slur to Describe Majority Black Countries
President slams Durbin-Graham immigration proposal in epic Twitter rant

President Donald Trump speaks during news conference with Prime Minister Erna Solberg of Norway in the East Room at the White House on Wednesday. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Friday denied using the term “shithole countries” to describe Haiti and African nations during a Thursday Oval Office meeting on immigration.

And, in classic Trumpian form, he attempted to alter the day’s new coverage to focus on a bipartisan immigration overhaul proposal offered by Sens. Richard J. Durbin and Lindsey Graham — a plan he rejected during an Oval Office meeting that also featured immigration hawks from his White House and Congress.

Members of Both Parties Criticize Trump’s Vulgar Immigration Remark
After White House initially doesn’t deny accounts, Trump tweets early Friday that he didn’t say it

President Donald Trump early Friday said that he didn’t call Haiti and African countries “shithole countries” despite multiple media reports of accounts from lawmakers who were in a meeting about immigration policy. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images file photo)

Members of both parties roundly criticized President Donald Trump after the Washington Post reported he called Haiti and African countries “shithole countries.”

The White House did not initially deny that Trump made the remarks in a bipartisan meeting about immigration.

Booker, Harris Add Historic Diversity to Senate Judiciary
2020 hopefuls are second and third black senators to serve on panel

New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker is the first black man to sit on the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The addition of Democrats Cory Booker of New Jersey and Kamala Harris of California to the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday gave the two potential 2020 presidential hopefuls a big platform, but also a spot in the panel’s history.

Booker becomes the first black man to sit on the committee, which oversees civil rights, voting rights, housing discrimination and other Justice Department enforcement efforts that are seen as crucial to African-Americans. Harris, who is biracial, becomes the second black woman to serve on the panel, after Carol Moseley Braun of Illinois, who left the Senate in 1999.