Cedric L Richmond

Terri Sewell Is Getting Some Help
With Doug Jones’ election, she is no longer only Democrat in Ala. delegation

Rep. Terri A. Sewell worked to get national Democrats involved in the Alabama Senate race. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — When Rep. Terri A. Sewell joined Doug Jones on the campaign trail in Alabama, she would often say she needed help in Washington, D.C., as the lone Democrat in the delegation.

Standing onstage here with Jones as he celebrated his historic win over Republican Roy Moore in the Alabama Senate race Tuesday night, Sewell interjected at one point, yelling, “Help is on the way!”

Conyers’ Downfall Was Richmond’s ‘Most Trying Moment’
‘You want to hold out hope that he did not do these awful things,’ Congressional Black Caucus chairman says

Rep. Cedric Richmond, D-La., walks down the House steps following a vote in the Capitol on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Congressional Black Caucus Chairman Rep. Cedric Richmond called the downfall of Rep. John Conyers one of the most difficult moments in Richmond’s time leading the caucus.

Conyers announced his resignation effective immediately on Tuesday amid reports he sexually harassed multiple women. The Michigan Democrat also said he endorsed his son to run for his seat.

Leadership, CBC Differ on Conyers
Democratic leaders call for resignation, CBC members refrain

Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi on Thursday called for Michigan Rep. John Conyers to resign, Democratic caucus leaders followed her lead but Congressional Black Caucus leaders did not.

“We’ve already issued a statement; I’ve called upon the same,” House Democratic Caucus Chairman Joe Crowley told reporters.

Pelosi Calls on Conyers to Resign
‘I pray for Congressman Conyers and his family’

Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi called on the longest-serving member of Congress to resign Thursday amid allegations of sexual misconduct. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 1:33 p.m. | House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Speaker Paul D. Ryan in separate remarks Thursday called for Michigan Democrat John Conyers Jr., the longest-serving member, to resign amid multiple allegations of sexual misconduct.

“I pray for Congressman Conyers and his family and wish them well,” Pelosi said. “However, Congressman Conyers should resign.”

Trump on Course for Least Diverse Judicial Picks Since Reagan
President’s nominees have been overwhelmingly white and male

Greg Katsas was nominated by President Donald Trump for a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. He is seen here during his confirmation hearing last month. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump’s picks for federal judgeships reflect a strikingly different direction when it comes to diversity on the bench — it is the most white and male group of nominees in recent history.

So far, 91 percent of Trump’s 58 judicial nominees for district and appeals courts are white, a pace that would make his appointees the least diverse since the Reagan administration, according to statistics compiled by the liberal advocacy group Alliance for Justice. Only 19 percent of his picks are women, a pace that would make his appointees the most male since the George H.W. Bush administration.

Capitol Hill Figures Out What to Do With 280 Characters
Members finding creative ways to use Twitter’s expanded limit

Members of Congress are already making the most of the 140 extra characters available for tweets. (Chris Hale/CQ Roll Call)

Lawmakers are experimenting with new ways to communicate with the extra characters Twitter has given them.

The increased 280-character limit for tweets is already being used to post full statements, Q&As with experts or the member, more hashtags and longer lists in a single posting, instead of a series of tweets.

Opinion: Did Everyone in the White House Take a Nap During History Class?
White House Chief of Staff John Kelly wrong to repeat “Lost Cause” mythology

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly was on the wrong side of the facts when he repeated the Confederate “Lost Cause” mythology, Mary C. Curtis writes. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

In forward-looking America, history is sometimes regarded as a roadblock to progress, a nuisance. And that, as has been repeatedly proven, is a mistake.

Why look back when the future is so important? Well, because failure to do exactly that has consequences.

Members Prepare to Take On Capitol Police in Football
Capitol Police have won the last three Congressional Football Games

Illinois Rep. Robert J. Dold looks for an open man to pass the ball as former NFL player Ken Harvey blocks the Guards’ Irvin Washington during the 2015 Congressional Football Game for Charity. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Congress has been celebrating the Capitol Police for keeping them safe, especially after two officers took down a gunman in June at the Republicans’ baseball practice.

Members will get another chance at an upcoming charity sporting contest for Capitol Police officers. 

Scalise Gets Emotional Welcome Back to the House
Thanks colleagues for their ‘outpouring of love, of warmth, of prayer’

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., walks with his wife Jennifer from the House chamber to his office in the Capitol on his first day back in Congress on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise returned to the Capitol Thursday to a standing ovation from his colleagues as he walked out on the House floor on crutches to deliver an emotional speech announcing his plans to officially return to work. 

“You have no idea how great this feels to be back here at work in the people’s house,” the Louisiana Republican said.

Members Lose Charity Basketball Game, but Honor Teammate Scalise
Lobbyists won 19th annual charity event for third year in a row

Dan Coen of KemPharm holds up the championship trophy after the lobbyists’ team defeated lawmakers, 49-41, in the 19th annual Congressional Basketball Classic on Tuesday. (Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call)

The members’ team lost the Congressional Basketball Classic in one of the biggest showings of bipartisanship and Capitol Hill spirit since the Congressional Baseball Game.

Majority Whip Steve Scalise, who was shot while practicing for the baseball game, has been a staple of the basketball game. Although he was on the roster, he wasn’t able to attend the game while still in recovery.