Charles E Grassley

The Replacements: Trump Has No Shortage of Candidates to Follow Sessions
A Mueller probe skeptic and several GOP senators all make the list

Then-Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., endorses Donald Trump to be the Republican nominee for president during a campaign rally at Madison City Schools Stadium in Madison, Ala., on Feb. 28. 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

There is no shortage of candidates to replace Jeff Sessions as attorney general, and President Donald Trump could even again turn to the Senate.

Sessions and Trump clashed almost from the start, with the president even admitting he gave the former Alabama lawmaker the job out of a sense of loyalty. Sessions was the first GOP senator to endorse Trump’s 2016 White House candidacy. As Democrats warn of a constitutional crisis, the president will get to pick a nominee this time for other reasons.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions Out, Constitutional Crisis Murmurs Begin
Ongoing feud between Trump and Sessions comes to an end

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is out just one day after the 2018 midterms in which Democrats regained control of the House. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump fired Attorney General Jeff Sessions one day after Democrats regained control of the House and voiced intent to ratchet up pressure on the White House.

Trump used a tweet Wednesday afternoon to make the announcement and install Matthew Whitaker, Sessions’ chief of staff, as the acting attorney general.

Steve King Belittles NRCC for Supporting Gay Candidate
Embattled Republican makes joke about Supreme Court justices Kagan and Sotomayor ‘eloping to Cuba’

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, has been under fire for taking positions supporting white nationalists. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Under renewed scrutiny for his incendiary comments about immigration and multiculturalism, embattled Iowa Rep. Steve King leaned on homophobia in his closing statement to voters Monday, according to video captured by Democratic trackers and other reports.

King ratcheted up his feud with the House campaign arm of the Republican Party, belittling the National Republican Congressional Committee for supporting a gay candidate in California.

Grassley Claims Child Molester, MS-13 Members in Caravan — Provides No Details
Trump sending thousands of U.S. troops to southern border to assist security officials before caravan reaches U.S.

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles E. Grassley, R-Iowa, claimed Thursday that his office had received information that some members of a caravan of Central Americans traveling to the United States were members of the MS-13 gang. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley claimed, citing "Law Enforcement Sensitive" information, that his office has received information that among the thousands of Central American immigrants in a caravan headed for the United States are a child molester and members of the violent MS-13 gang.

Grassley wrote a letter Thursday requesting briefings in front of the Judiciary Committee from Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen on “the makeup of the caravan,” including any “national security threats” among its travelers.

Ethanol Lobbying Is Up, and It Seems to Be Paying Off
Biofuels groups are spending more this year, and they may soon have summer E15 to show for it

Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, holds an ear of corn in 2008. As industry groups have lobbied the Trump administration to rethink the Renewable Fuel Standard, lawmakers in the corn belt have applied pressure too. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Biofuel groups upped their spending on lobbying this year as they pressured lawmakers and the Trump administration on issues related to the Renewable Fuel Standard, which sets minimum volumes of biofuels to be used to power cars and trucks.

Some of those efforts appear to be paying off for now, as the Trump administration has proposed to allow year-round sales of gasoline containing 15 percent ethanol, or E15, which is currently prohibited between June and September. The EPA had argued previously that E15 contributes more to summer smog than the more commonly sold gasoline with 10 percent ethanol.

Grassley Refers Avenatti, Kavanaugh Accuser Client for Criminal Investigation
Judiciary chairman asks DOJ to look at three potential violations: conspiracy, false statements and obstruction of Congress

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, has referred attorney Michael Avenatti and his client Julie Swetnick to the Justice Department for criminal investigation related to accusations they made against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh during his confirmation process. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley is referring attorney Michael Avenatti and his client Julie Swetnick to the Justice Department for criminal investigation related to their accusations against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh during his confirmation process.

Swetnick was among the women who came forward to accuse Kavanaugh of sexual assault. Specifically, she said she observed Kavanaugh and his friends drinking to excess at parties in high school and lining up outside bedrooms to gang rape females. 

Democrats’ Absence Not Halting Procession of Trump Judicial Nominees
Recess week hearing features two nominees for the Ninth Circuit

Sen. Orrin G. Hatch has been a regular participant in the Judiciary Committee hearings during the Senate recess. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

For the second week in a row, no Senate Democrats made the trip back to D.C. to question a slate of President Donald Trump’s nominees for lifetime appointments to the federal bench, but their boycott is not impeding the GOP’s ability to line up those nominees for confirmation by the end of the year. 

Sen. Michael D. Crapo of Idaho presided over the hearing, which also featured an appearance by former Chairman Orrin G. Hatch of Utah. Democrats have decried the unusual recess hearings as a further erosion of senatorial courtesy and an indication of Republicans’ desire to ram through judges regardless of institutional protocol.

Senate GOP Forges Ahead With Judicial Nominations Despite More Democratic Opposition
Sen. Patty Murray is against Wednesday hearing for a home state nominee

Assistant Minority Leader Patty Murray opposes holding a hearing on a judicial nominee from her home state while the Senate is away. Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley does not seem to care. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate is still away, but its Judiciary Committee keeps plugging away.

The panel is scheduled to hold another likely sparsely attended confirmation hearing on Wednesday to hear from more of President Donald Trump’s judicial nominees, including a Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals selection opposed by home-state Democratic senators.

Wednesday Won’t Be Your Average Recess Hump Day
Rosenstein testimony, Senate Judiciary, Trump rally to showcase tribal warfare

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein will be interviewed by the leaders of two House committees on Wednesday, part of a busy time at the Capitol and White House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Embattled Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein finally testifies. The Senate Judiciary Committee will continue its autumn of discontent. And President Donald Trump will sign opioids legislation before taking his midterms road show to Wisconsin.

No, Wednesday will not be your typical recess day. Rather, it will be a cable news bonanza chronicling the country’s era of tribal political warfare.

5 Takeaways From Heidi Cruz’s Atlantic Interview
Ted Cruz’s wife had to grapple with her place in the world as she made sacrifices for her husband

Heidi Cruz and and daughters Caroline, right, and Catherine greet guests during a convocation in March 2015 at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Va., where Sen. Ted Cruz announced his candidacy for president. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In a candid interview with The Atlantic, Heidi Cruz discussed the ways her life has been shaped by the political pursuits of her husband, Sen. Ted Cruz.

The Texas Republican faces a re-election challenge from Democratic Rep. Beto O’Rourke, who despite record fundraising totals, has lost momentum in the polls. Inside Elections with Nathan L. Gonzales rates the race Likely Republican.