Charles E Schumer

Creation of a panel disputing climate change causes White House infighting
The Trump administration is considering establishing a cohort of scientists led by climate denier William Happer

Donald Trump's Environment advisor Myron Ebell arrives for a meeting at Downing Street on January 31, 2017, in London, England. Ebell has referred to the Environmental movement as the "greatest threat to freedom". (Leon Neal/Getty Images)

Plans to create a White House panel to dispute established climate science are facing sharp opposition from within the building, according to an official familiar with the matter and an administration adviser.

The Trump administration is considering establishing a cohort of scientists at the National Security Council, led by Princeton physicist and climate change denier William Happer, to challenge established scientific conclusions of the severity of climate change and humanity’s contributions to it.

Trump’s DOT stalling for revenge, say backers of NY-NJ project
The agency is accused of stalling Amtrak’s Gateway project because of Democratic opposition to a Mexico border wall

Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., conducts a news conference after the Senate Policy luncheons in the Capitol on Tuesday, March 5, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senators from New Jersey and New York accused the Trump administration of stalling Amtrak’s Gateway project linking their states as revenge for Democratic opposition to a Mexico border wall. One said a deputy transportation secretary lied about the project, and that could hurt his nomination to serve in the Justice Department.

Deputy Transportation Secretary Jeffrey Rosen, who has been nominated for deputy attorney general, said Monday there was no funding for Gateway in the fiscal 2020 budget or in the fiscal 2019 appropriations package that Trump signed in February to end a standoff over the wall.

Trump, Pelosi agree on one thing: No impeachment, but for different reasons
‘I never did anything wrong,’ president tweets, linking economic strength to impeachment decision

President Donald Trump argues about border security with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi as Vice President Mike Pence, second from left, and Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer look on. Trump and Pelosi actually agree on something: not impeaching Trump. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump and Speaker Nancy Pelosi actually agree on something. But their shared view that the House should not start impeachment proceedings against him are based on starkly different reasons.

I’m not for impeachment,” the California Democrat said in an eye-opening interview with the Washington Post that was published Monday.

Democrats try to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory
So far, they’re off to a fast start in alienating swing voters

The more the Democratic Party embraces the policies of presidential nominees like Sen. Bernie Sanders, the less swing voters will be thinking of the 2020 election as a referendum on President Donald Trump, Rothenberg writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — Democrats are off to a fast start in their efforts to blow the 2020 presidential election.

Sure, Donald Trump’s job approval ratings from reputable polling firms still sit in the low- to mid-40s, and congressional investigations are likely to keep the president, his family and his administration on the defensive.

Schumer says Trump ‘redefined chutzpah’ when he called the Democratic Party ‘anti-Jewish’
New York senator, who is Jewish, was responding to comments made outside the White House

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said Donald Trump has “redefined chutzpah.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer says that President Donald Trump calling the Democratic Party the “anti-Israel, anti-Jewish party” has “redefined chutzpah.”

“For the president, who when neo-Nazis marched in Charlottesville in front of a synagogue and said ‘burn it down’ and he said ‘both sides’ are to blame, this is a new divisive low,” the Democrat from New York, who is Jewish, wrote on Facebook.

Democrats vow Judge Chad Readler will be 2020 issue
Murray and Schumer among Democrats blasting his role in targeting health care law

The Senate confirmed Chad A. Readler, President Trump’s nominee to be U.S. Circuit Judge for the 6th Circuit, on Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats say they will remember the Wednesday afternoon vote to confirm Chad A. Readler, one of President Donald Trump’s most contentious judicial nominees.

The 52-47 vote to install Readler on the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Ohio could easily be lumped in with many other Trump choices pushed through the Senate by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky.

Congress glad Trump walked in Vietnam, but questions trust in Kim Jong Un
Criticism of his accepting Kim’s denial of knowledge of Otto Warmbier’s treatment

Speaker Nancy Pelosi is among the lawmakers who supported President Donald Trump’s decision to walk away from the talks with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Members of Congress are glad President Donald Trump didn’t emerge from his meetings with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un with a bad bargain, but some are blasting the president’s taking the dictator at his word about the deadly treatment of U.S. citizen Otto Warmbier.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, for instance, said she’s “glad that the president walked away” from the North Korean leader’s offer to denuclearize only if the United States lifted all sanctions against his country.

Trump’s winning pattern with legislation might become a thing of the past: CQ Vote Studies
Republican control of both chambers primed the pump for president’s 2018 success

President Donald Trump standing with Congress slipped just a bit in 2018, but he still locked down a 98.7 percent support rate. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Riding Republican majorities in both chambers last year, President Donald Trump put up strong numbers for the second consecutive year in getting support for his nominees and legislation he backed, winning 93.4 percent of the time, according to data compiled for CQ’s annual vote study of presidential support.

That’s among the highest for any chief executive since CQ began tracking the data in 1954, during the Eisenhower administration — third to be exact. But it is down 5 percentage points from Trump’s record-high level of support during his first year in office, when Congress supported his positions 98.7 percent of the time.

Hunt is on for legislative train as riders get in line
Legislative items are piling up, and some worry it will be September before a budget and debt ceiling deal is reached

Perdue arrives in the Capitol for Senate policy luncheons. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Urgent legislative items are piling up in search of a fast-moving vehicle, including food assistance for Puerto Rico residents, aid to crop growers in southeastern states hurt by last year’s hurricanes, and compensation for victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

The hunt got a little more desperate Tuesday after the Congressional Budget Office estimated lawmakers may have even more time than they thought to tackle the statutory debt ceiling. While the nation’s borrowing cap roars back to life at roughly $22 trillion on Saturday, the CBO says Treasury accounting moves will generate enough “headroom” to remain under the ceiling until late September or early October.

Democrats see loss of Senate power in latest judicial vote
Both home-state senators opposed appointment of Eric D. Miller to 9th Circuit

Eric D. Miller is the first appeals court judge confirmed over the objections of both home state senators since at least 1956. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate confirmed another of President Donald Trump’s appeals court nominees Tuesday evening, in a vote that Democrats say represents further erosion of senators’ power to influence who is appointed to federal courts from their states.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said on the floor that Eric Miller’s law career makes him “well prepared” for a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit, which is based in San Francisco and hears cases from nine states. Miller, confirmed 53-46, will fill a spot that has traditionally been associated with a nominee from Washington state.