Charlie Dent

DCCC Adds 11 GOP Targets, including Paul Ryan
Democrats are now targeting 91 Republican districts in 2018

New Mexico Rep. Ben Ray Luján chairs the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee has added 11 more Republicans to its 2018 target list, including Speaker Paul D. Ryan.

The DCCC now has its sights on 91 GOP seats next year. Twenty-three are districts that Democrat Hillary Clinton carried last year, while 68 voted for President Donald Trump. The new targets were first reported by The Washington Post.

Why Scott Taylor Is Worried About Trump
Republican congressman says Democrats’ strong showing in Virginia is referendum on administration

Reps. Charlie Dent, R-Pa., left to right, Scott Taylor, R-Va., and Bradley Byrne, R-Ala., leave a meeting of the House Republican Conference last month. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican Rep. Scott Taylor didn’t mince words when he said a wave of Democratic victories in Virginia were a “referendum” on the Trump administration and it could be because it spells trouble him next year.

Democratic Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam won the gubernatorial race and a number of Democratic challengers beat incumbent Republicans to win seats in the House of Delegates.

Small-Business Concerns Threaten GOP Tax Overhaul
Many Republicans worry small-business owners won’t see benefits

House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady and his committee might consider changes to the GOP tax bill’s small-business provisions to address members’ concerns. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Concerns from rank-and-file Republicans about small-business provisions in the House GOP tax bill are emerging as the biggest threats to the legislation’s passage in the chamber.

The specific concerns vary from the types of small businesses that will benefit from a reduced 25 percent tax rate to the amount of so-called pass-through income that will still be taxed at individual rates.

GOP Tax Bill: The Fine-Tuning and Defense Begins
House Republicans hope to vote on measure by Thanksgiving

From left, House Republican Conference Chairwoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers, Florida Rep. Carlos Curbelo, Kansas Rep. Lynn Jenkins, Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, Speaker Paul D. Ryan, Florida Rep. Vern Buchanan and South Dakota Rep. Kristi Noem at a news conference in the Longworth Building on Thursday to unveil the House GOP tax bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House Republican tax bill will undergo lots of tweaking, but the generally positive response so far indicates that leadership’s plan to vote on the overhaul by Thanksgiving is still within reach.

The stakes are high for Republicans as they search for a major legislative achievement ahead of the 2018 elections. Members agree a win is needed under President Donald Trump’s leadership after the effort to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law collapsed in the Senate.

Are GOP Retirements Draining the Swamp?
Congressional retirements and resignations clearing some space

House Republicans, such as Pennsylvania Rep. Charlie Dent, have opted not to run for re-election in part due to frustrations with the way President Donald Trump is running the White House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

On the campaign trail, President Donald Trump pledged over and over to “drain the swamp,” promising to gut what he said was a gridlocked Washington political establishment.

His supporters chanted the catchy slogan at rallies and kept doing so at Trump events even after the reality television figure moved into the White House.

In GOP Retirements, Some See an Omen
As the Ways and Means exodus continues, observers wonder what it means for tax overhaul

Rep. Dave Reichert, shown here in 2015, is one of seven Republicans on the powerful Ways and Means Committee who have announced they will leave Congress or retire. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The departure of key Ways and Means Republicans could be a sign of diminished optimism for major legislative achievements, but some GOP observers say it may actually signal confidence about getting a landmark tax bill signed into law.

Six Republicans on the powerful committee with broad sway over taxes, health care and trade are running for higher office or planning to retire at the end of this term while the GOP is at the height of its power in Washington.

With One Now in the White House, Celebrities Crowd the Political Stage
It doesn’t end with Kid Rock; actors, a former Olympian and one of the ”sexiest men alive” plan to run

Kid Rock may have been among the first celebrities to emerge as a potential candidate in 2018, but he wasn’t the last. (Theo Wargo/Getty Images)

That led to chatter that Peyton Manning, the legendary NFL and University of Tennessee quarterback, could take the Republican senator’s Tennessee seat. But with Manning quickly quashing speculation he would make the race, Kid Rock was back on top.

“We will be scheduling a press conference in the next 6 weeks or so to address this issue amongst others, and if I decide to throw my hat in the ring for US Senate, believe me …  it’s game on mthrfkers,” his campaign website states.

Why Trump’s Immigration Demands Haven’t Changed the Dynamics on Hill
Prospects for a bipartisan bill were already grim

A sign at an immigration rights protest in from on the White House on Sept. 5 to oppose President Donald Trump’s decision to phase out the DACA program. (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

President Donald Trump’s decision to push for his border wall as part of an immigration deal — after previously saying it would be dealt with separately — would, at first glance, seem to lower the probability of a bipartisan accord.

But the prospects were already grim. So Sunday’s release of Trump’s immigration policy priorities caused no major shift in the dynamics on Capitol Hill. 

Reichert Says He Would Have Arrested Trump
If Trump had made infamous ‘Access Hollywood’ comments in former sheriff’s jurisdiction

Rep. Dave Reichert, R-Wash., on President Donald Trump’s “Access Hollywood” tape: “There was no reasonable explanation for those words.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Retiring Republican Rep. Dave Reichert said if President Donald Trump had made his 2005 comments about grabbing women in Washington when he was a cop, he would have arrested him.

Reichert was speaking in an interview with Vice News about the difficulty moderate Republicans face. 

Podcast: Quitting Congress
The Big Story, Episode 71

Rep. Charlie Dent's decision to retire made his district more competitive. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

A spate of high profile lawmakers have announced they're retiring from Congress, but they are likely to be followed by others, says Roll Call elections analyst Nathan Gonzales. Senior political writer Bridget Bowman and leadership editor Jason Dick discuss who else might retire.

Show Notes: