Chris Coons

Chuck Schumer Navigates the Resistance
The Senate’s Democratic leader wants to get along with everyone. Now he finds himself between Scylla and Charybdis

Senate Minority Leader Sen. Charles Schumer waves an American flag after unveiling the Democrats’ ‘Better Deal for Our Democracy’ platform in May. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Back when he was policy director for Sen. Charles E. Schumer, Jim Kessler had a conversation with his boss about working with a high-profile Republican. This is how it went, according to Kessler.

Schumer: I can call Newt, he likes me.

Coons Wants Info on Kavanaugh’s Knowledge of ‘Sexually Explicit’ Emails
Democratic senator asks nominee if former judge ‘treated women inappropriately’

Brett Kavanaugh adjusts his nameplate as he takes his seat for day three of his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee last week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A Democratic senator wants to know if Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh ever received email from an alleged “sexually explicit email list” run by a former federal appellate judge who resigned amid sexual misconduct allegations.

Alex Kozinski served on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit, for over 30 years until he retired in December amid allegations of sexual misconduct. Kavanaugh clerked for Kozinski in 1991, and Sen. Chris Coons of Delaware wants to know if the high court nominee was part of the illicit email list.

3 Takeaways From Brett Kavanaugh’s Testimony
Americans ‘rightly’ will have ‘dimmer view of the Senate,’ Graham says

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies Wednesday before members of the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS — Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh spent two days jousting with Senate Democrats over his views on executive power and abortion rights. But he appeared mindful that his top job was to keep all 51 Republican senators firmly in his corner.

Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee rarely flustered the 12-year veteran of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, and by midday Thursday several complimented his knowledge of the law and character. Republican Judiciary members began Thursday in a huddle called by Chairman Charles E. Grassley and spent the second day of questioning refuting Democrats’ criticisms of the nominee and defending him.

What If Senators Actually Tried to Expel Cory Booker?
To start, it would be a case for the Ethics Committee

Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, responds to a threat by Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., to release committee confidential documents during the start of day three of Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court confirmation hearing Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The threat of expulsion that hung over the Judiciary Committee on Thursday jolted the proceedings, but it is highly unlikely that Cory Booker — or any other lawmaker — is actually going to be expelled from the Senate for the unauthorized disclosure of documents about Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Booker dared Majority Whip John Cornyn to try to expel him Thursday, when he announced he had ordered his staff to release “committee confidential” documents relating to the New Jersey Democrat’s line of questioning at the Kavanaugh hearings.

Harris Lands First Blow on Kavanaugh — But It Only Grazes Him
Senator accuses nominee of remembering conversation but not wanting 'to tell us'

From left: Sens. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., Kamala Harris, D-Calif., and Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., confer during the Senate Judiciary Committee's confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 11:14 a.m. | ANALYSIS — It took almost 12 hours Wednesday before a Democratic senator, Kamala Harris of California, landed more than a glancing blow on the Teflon chin of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. And even then, she wasn’t able to put President Donald Trump’s second high court pick on the canvas.

The late-night exchange lasted nearly 10 minutes, left Kavanaugh with a dumbfounded facial expression several times, and led Utah Republican Sen. Mike Lee to break in with a helping hand.

Tom Carper Seeks to Avoid Castle-Like Upset in Delaware Primary
Longtime senator faces Democratic challenger Kerri Evelyn Harris on Thursday

Sen. Thomas R. Carper, D-Del., faces a Thursday primary. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Thomas R. Carper is the latest longtime Democrat facing a competitive primary, but he insists he won’t be caught by surprise.

Carper is universally known in Delaware, having served in the House and then as governor before arriving in the Senate in 2001.

Kavanaugh’s First Stand Was the Blandest Thing Since White Bread
To say even that is an insult to all the plastic-wrapped loaves on supermarket shelves

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh offered bromides so dull on Tuesday, it’s a wonder he didn’t put senators to sleep, Shapiro writes. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

OPINION — It was Ben Sasse — the conservative Nebraska Republican who makes a fetish out of seeming like the last rational man in the era of Donald Trump — who crystalized the issues facing the Senate as it began the most consequential hearing on a Supreme Court nominee in decades.

Stressing the independence of the judiciary, Sasse said, “This is the last job interview that Brett Kavanaugh will ever have.”

Here Are the Senators Attending John McCain’s Funeral
List includes 14 Republicans and 10 Democrats

At least 24 senators will attend the funeral service Thursday of Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., in Phoenix. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

At least 24 current U.S. senators will attend Sen. John McCain’s memorial service Thursday in Phoenix, his office said.

The service, which will begin at approximately 10 a.m. local time, follows a procession from the Arizona state Capitol, where visitors on Wednesday could observe McCain’s casket draped in the American flag.

McCain Remembered as He Wished: One Who Served Honorably
Members of both parties praised the late Arizona senator

A slightly frayed flag flies at the Capitol in Washington fly at half staff on Sunday morning, after Sen. John McCain died on Saturday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

In September 2017, Sen. John McCain was asked how he would be like to be remembered.

He said he wanted to be remembered as someone who served his country. “I hope we could add, honorably,” he told CNN at the time.

Lawmakers Wary of Potential Trump Cuts to Foreign Aid
Corker, Menendez doubt legality of reported plan

Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Bob Corker, R-Tenn., left, and ranking member Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., doubt the administration has the legal authority to impound funds in the way they are reportedly planning. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sources close to Capitol Hill and within the foreign aid community say that Trump administration officials are preparing a potential foreign aid “rescission” package that could cut between $2 billion and $4 billion in fiscal 2017 and fiscal 2018 funds from the State Department and U.S. Agency for International Development.

Some $200 million intended to benefit Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza Strip is thought to be on the chopping block as part of the request, sources said.