Chris Stewart

House Backs Suicide Hotline Bill; Could Lead to 3-Digit Dial Code
Measure designed to streamline aid for mental health crisis prevention

Rep. Chris Stewart is sponsoring legislation to streamline the suicide prevention hotline. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo.)

The National Suicide Prevention Hotline is headed for an overhaul, with passage of a House bill Monday. The bipartisan proposal would move towards creating a new national three-digit dialing code — similar to 911 — to be used for a mental health crisis and suicide prevention hotline.

The House passed the bill by an overwhelming, 379-1, margin. Michigan Republican Justin Amash cast the lone nay vote against the bill, sponsored by Republican Rep. Chris Stewart of Utah. 

Hatch Seeks Quick House Action to Improve Suicide Prevention Hotline
Legislation passed Senate last November

Sen. Orrin G. Hatch has renewed his push to improve a hotline designed to help prevent suicides. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After recent high-profile suicides, Sen. Orrin G. Hatch is pushing for the House to expedite work on a bipartisan bill to improve the national suicide prevention hotline.

“Our bill requires the FCC to recommend an easy-to-remember, three-digit number for the national suicide prevention hotline. I believe that by making the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline system more user-friendly and accessible, we can save thousands of lives by helping people find the help they need when they need it most,” the Utah Republican said in a floor speech. “The Senate passed our bill with overwhelming bipartisan support in November. Now it’s time for the House to do its part.”

FISA Memo Not What Trump Says It Is, Some Republicans Say
Memo does not ‘vindicate’ Trump, Gowdy and others say

Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., called the FISA memo and the special counsel investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia separate issues. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Key Republican House members rejected the notion that the memo released by the House Intelligence Committee last week “totally vindicates” President Donald Trump, as the president tweeted on Saturday.

GOP Reps. Trey Gowdy, Chris Stewart, Will Hurd and Brad Wenstrup made the Sunday political talk show circuit and agreed the memo is a separate issue from special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Opinion: Civil Liberties and Odd-Duck Congressional Coalitions
FISA debate a throwback to more bipartisan times

While the FISA bill amendment by Reps. Zoe Lofgren of California and Justin Amash of Michigan failed, it attracted bipartisan support from 58 Republicans and 125 Democrats. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photos)

For two hours last Thursday, the House held a debate that harked back to the heyday of Sonny and Cher and Butch and the Sundance Kid. Instead of lockstep polarization on Capitol Hill, throwback Thursday marked a brief return to the era when legislative coalitions crossed party lines.

The topic before the House was the intersection of civil liberties and national security — about the only issue that can still upend standard red-and-blue divisions.

Take Five: John Curtis
Utah Republican says his predecessor, Jason Chaffetz, told him not to run

Utah Rep. John Curtis is walking less than he did as mayor but he gets more tired now. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Freshman Rep. John Curtis, 57, a Utah Republican, talks about using all his energy on the GOP primary, advice from former Rep. Jason Chaffetz and missing Christmastime in Provo.

Q: What has surprised you so far about Congress?

Word on the Hill: Women’s March From NRA to DOJ
Happy Bastille Day

ICYMI: Former Vice President Joe Biden spoke to Senate pages after posing for a group photo during his visit to the Capitol on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

There’s another Women’s March today and this time, organizers are inviting protesters to march from National Rifle Association headquarters in Virginia to the Justice Department in D.C.

Organizers said the goal of the 17-mile march is to “to protest NRA’s incendiary & racist actions.”

Report: Chaffetz Might Leave Congress Early
Statement comes after Oversight Committee chairman announced he would not run in 2018

Jason Chaffetz said Thursday that he could leave Congress before the end of his term in 2018, Utah radio station KSL reported.

Network of Mormons on Capitol Hill Lend Each Other a Hand
Ryan Martin and Gordon Larsen revived Latter-day Saints Staff Association

Gordon Larsen, right, and Ryan Martin are the co-chairmen of the Latter-day Saints Staff Association. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Once a month, a group of Mormon staffers make it a point to have lunch together on Capitol Hill.

Like other staffer groups, the Latter-day Saints Staff Association is based around building a network. But this one is connected by faith. 

Who Trump Could Expect to Support His Term Limits Proposal
A few dozen members of Congress support legislation calling for term limits

Kentucky Rep. Andy Barr introduced legislation last year, calling for term limits on senators and House members. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s proposal to impose congressional term limits is unlikely to attract many allies in a Congress where he already has few. But there are still a few dozen Republicans he could likely count on to back the idea.

Congressional term limits can only be imposed through the adoption of a constitutional amendment. Nine Republican members of Congress have introduced several resolutions calling for such an amendment, collectively garnering a few dozen GOP co-sponsors.

Republicans in Congress Against Trump
Most have expressed concerns with party's nominee after video surfaced

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a rally in Panama City Beach, Florida on Tuesday. (Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images)

To date, 53 Republican members of Congress have publicly declared their opposition to Donald Trump, their party's presidential nominee.

They have either said explicitly that they will not vote for him, withdrawn previous endorsements or called on him to abandon his candidacy. (Some in that last group haven’t said how they’ll vote if Trump doesn’t drop out.)