Collin C Peterson

A Gun Rights Vote Only the GOP Base Can Appreciate
Expansion of concealed carry permission will die in the Senate, but the NRA really wanted the vote

Majority Whip John Cornyn has some doubts that he can get a bill passed that would improve background checks for gun purchasers but doesn’t make it easier for gun owners to carry concealed weapons across state lines. A House bill passed Wednesday would do both. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

One government shutdown may be narrowly averted, but another looms right around the corner. The stain of sexual misconduct at the Capitol continues to spread, and an alleged child predator is days away from possibly joining the Senate. Middle East destabilization seems assured as Congress gets its wish to move the U.S. embassy in Israel to Jerusalem. Public support dwindles daily for a loophole-encrusted, deficit-busting tax package that would be the year’s biggest legislative achievement. The push for presidential impeachment has gone far enough to necessitate procedural pushback in the House.

A week such as this one — already chockablock with headlines touching the Hill — seemed to the Republicans who run the place like an ideal time for making a bold hiding-in-plain-sight move.

What Happens to Franken’s Seat If He Resigns?
Governor would appoint placeholder, followed by special election in November 2018

There could be two Senate elections next fall in Minnesota instead of just one. If Sen. Al Franken steps down, there would be a special election for the remainder of his term. Senior Sen. Amy Klobuchar’s seat is also up next year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Minnesota Sen. Al Franken isn’t up for re-election until 2020. But if he announces his resignation Thursday, the North Star State will be holding two Senate elections next fall.

Ahead of next November, though, not much would shift in the Senate. If Democratic-Farmer-Labor Gov. Mark Dayton appoints another Democrat immediately, the balance of power in the Senate would remain unchanged.

NRCC Targets Democrats on Tax Overhaul in New Digital Ads
Republicans see taxes as a potent campaign issue

Minnesota Rep. Rick Nolanis one of the Democrats targeted in the latest NRCC ads. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The National Republican Congressional Committee is launching new digital ads targeting Democrats who voted against the tax overhaul that passed the House on Thursday. No members of the minority party voted for the legislation.

The 15-second videos, provided first to Roll Call, will start running on Facebook on Friday and target 25 House Democrats. The NRCC ad buy was described as “five figures” and the ads will run online for a week.

Ahead, the First Pure Party-Line Modern Tax Cut?
Bipartisanship has heralded tax bills for decades, but the Trump era is all about unique dynamics

If President Donald Trump is able to pul off a significant tax cut, it may well happen without any support from Democrats. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

The steady path toward today’s partisan polarization at the Capitol is etched in the history of tax bills over more than half a century.

If President Donald Trump is able to pull off his uphill drive to join most of his predecessors since World War II in securing a significant tax cut, it’s very possible he’ll do so exclusively with the votes of congressional Republicans.

Will 2018 Look Like 2010 for Anti-Repeal Republicans?
Nearly all Democrats who voted against Obamacare are no longer in office

Texas Rep. Will Hurd voted against the House Republican health care bill in May. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When House Republicans passed their measure to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law in May, 20 members of their conference voted against it.

While some of them might be able to defend themselves against criticism by saying they voted against a historically unpopular bill, they could find themselves in the same political peril as Democrats who voted against the original health care bill in 2010.

Capitol Rocked by Musicians, Fans in Congress
 

Word on the Hill: Your D.C. Fourth of July Schedule
Concert, Metro and parking logistics

Prepare for the fireworks on the mall this year. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

So you can plan ahead for this weekend, here is what’s going on in D.C. on the Fourth of July along with some logistical information.

Read HOH’s full Independence Day package, which includes a list of different things to do in the D.C. area, what members do for the holiday and what senators usually do.

Minnesota’s Rick Nolan Not Running for Governor
8th District congressman expected to run for re-election

Minnesota Rep. Rick Nolan has decided not to run for governor (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

For months, Minnesota Rep. Rick Nolan has been dancing with a run for governor. Friday afternoon, he announced he wouldn’t seek the state’s top job after all, suggesting he’ll run for re-election in the competitive 8th District in 2018. 

“The challenges and consequences of the issues facing our Nation in Washington are too important for me to walk away from at this time,” Nolan wrote on Facebook Friday afternoon. 

Minnesota GOP Apologizes for Inflammatory Ellison Post
District party called Ellison a ‘Muslim goat humper’

The Minnesota 7th Congressional District Republican Party was criticized for posting an Islamophobic image of Rep. Keith Ellison, D-Minn.. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Minnesota Republicans found themselves in trouble after one local party posted an Islamophobic image of Democratic Rep. Keith Ellison on its Facebook page.

The image, posted on Monday, showed Ellison on a turkey hunt with Democratic Rep. Collin Peterson, and text at the bottom called Ellison “Minnesota’s head Muslim goat humper” before asking, ‘Does this mean Muslim refugees coming to Western Minnesota?”

Collin Peterson Running for Re-Election Next Year
In neighboring Minnesota 8th District, Rick Nolan is still unsure

Rep. Collin C. Peterson, right, says he’s running for re-election in 2018 while fellow Minnesota Rep. Rick Nolan is still contemplating a gubernatorial run. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Democrat whose potential retirement gives his party the most heartburn every year, Minnesota Rep. Collin C. Peterson, is running for re-election next year.

“Yeah, I'm running. I’ve got 700 grand in the bank,” Peterson said outside the House chamber Wednesday afternoon.