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Grassley Will Step into Tax Storm, Finance Gavel in Hand
Iowa Republican was a key player on big-ticket measures during his previous tenure as Finance chairman

Chairman Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, conducts a Senate Judiciary Committee markup in October. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Charles E. Grassley is expected to be the next chairman of the Finance Committee, putting the Iowa Republican at the center of the storm in the 116th Congress on what could be divisive debates over tax, trade and health care policy.

Grassley cited a sense of “optimism” fueled by the “pro-growth” policies of a Republican president and Congress. “Looking ahead. ... I want to continue to work to make sure that as many Americans as possible get to experience this good economy for themselves,” he said in a statement released Friday. “That means working to provide Americans with additional tax relief and tax fairness so they can spend more of their hard-earned money on what’s important to them.”

With an Ambitious Policy Agenda, Pelosi is Poised to Lead the House Again
Calls increased from Democratic incumbents and candidates asking for new generation of leaders

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi holds a news conference in the Capitol on Nov. 7, the day after Democrats had retaken control of the House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Basking in House Democrats’ midterm election wins, Nancy Pelosi is focused on the planks of the Democratic campaign platform that will become the new majority’s agenda: health care, infrastructure and cleaning up corruption in Washington.

But the California Democrat cannot escape questions about another theme that emerged on the campaign trail — opposition to her leadership.

Pelosi Pumps Up Policy With a Side of Speakership Confidence
Leadership contests pile up but Pelosi, Hoyer insulated from challenges so far

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., holds a press conference in the Capitol on Wednesday, the day after Election Day. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Basking in the House Democrats’ midterm election wins, Nancy Pelosi wanted to focus on the planks of the Democratic campaign platform that will become the new majority’s agenda: health care, infrastructure and cleaning up corruption in Washington.

But the California Democrat cannot escape questions about another theme that emerged on the campaign trail — opposition to her leadership. 

A Defiant Trump Declares Midterm Outcome a Historic Event
Empowered Democrats looking to open the spigot on investigations

President Donald Trump has declared the midterm election results a historic event, claiming his efforts helped Republicans defy history. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

A defiant President Donald Trump on Wednesday painted Tuesday’s midterm elections as a historic event, declaring his efforts helped Republicans defy history and overcome a major Democratic fundraising advantage and negative media coverage.

He appeared in the East Room of the White House just hours after Republicans lost control of the House but expanded their narrow Senate majority. Trump focused mostly for Senate Republican candidates in the races final weeks, opening the door for him to declare victory — though his critics do not see it that way.

Democrats Win House Majority; Here’s What They’ll Do With It
Government overhaul first legislative item, followed by quick action on Dreamer protections, gun control

Now that House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and her party are back in power, they have several legislative priorities they wish to pursue. (Margaret Spencer/ CQ Roll Call)

Democrats have been abundantly clear about the top items that would be on their agenda if voters were to put them in the House majority, ranging from a campaign finance overhaul to legislation designed to reduce health care costs. 

Now that the midterm results have confirmed Democrats have won the House, here’s what you can expect with them in control next Congress. 

Democrats Score Oklahoma Upset Despite Deep-Red Struggles
Kendra Horn pulled off a surprise victory in Oklahoma City-anchored district

Rep. Steve Russell, R-Okla., lost to Democrat Kendra Horn on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

As Democrats struggled in deep red districts Tuesday night, Kendra Horn pulled off a surprise upset in Oklahoma. She defeated Republican Rep. Steve Russell in the 5th District, which includes Oklahoma City.

President Donald Trump won Russell’s district by nearly 14 points in 2016, and the race wasn’t considered a potential Democratic pickup. Russell, who was first elected in 2014, did not communicate to the National Republican Congressional Committee that he was in any trouble, according to a source with knowledge of the conversations.

Pressure Mounts for Corporations to Break with Steve King
Jewish leaders in Iowa call for more companies to break ties with embattled conservative congressman

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, is losing corporate donors for his extreme right-wing rhetoric. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Not only is Rep. Steve King’s party pulling back its support, but he’s losing corporate donors for his incendiary rhetoric too. 

Three companies that had previously backed King — Land O’ Lakes, Purina, and Intel —publicly committed to ceasing donations to the Republican congressman Tuesday, facing pressure from anti-racism activists on social media and Jewish congregations at home, the Des Moines Register reported

Trump Backpedals on Timing of Vague Tax Cut Proposal
Lawmakers, staff still not clear on what exactly president was talking about

President Donald Trump is walking back his comments about timing on a vague tax cut proposal he mentioned over the weekend. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump said any vote on a new tax overhaul bill he floated this weekend would come “after the election,” saying a “resolution” would be introduced in the next two weeks.

Trump’s remarks amounted to a presidential clarification of his own vague comments on Saturday, when he told reporters Republicans are “looking at putting in a very major tax cut for middle-income people.”

A Democratic Majority Could Milk Trump’s Trade Pact
‘The bar for supporting a new NAFTA will be high,’ says top Democrat on Ways and Means

Rep. Richard Neal, a Ways and Means Committee member since 1993 and now the panel’s top Democrat, voted against NAFTA and says he will scrutinize the proposed replacement. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Trump administration included provisions in the new trade deal with Canada and Mexico to win Democratic support, but if the midterm elections hand Democrats the majority in either the House or Senate, the path forward for the revised agreement may be more complicated.

President Donald Trump is expected to sign the agreement in principle on Nov. 30 and send implementing legislation to Congress sometime later. Trump also notified Congress on Tuesday that his administration plans to launch trade negotiations with the European Union, Japan and the United Kingdom in 2019.

Rep. Mimi Walters’ Lead Within Error Margin in New GOP Poll
Walters represents a district won by Hillary Clinton in 2016

Rep. Mimi Walters, R-Calif., at the House Energy and Commerce Committee meeting to organize for the 115th Congress on Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A new internal poll shows California Rep. Mimi Walters with a 50 percent share of the vote, leading Democratic challenger Katie Porter by 4 points. 

The incumbent’s 50-46 lead is within the poll’s +/-4.9% margin of error.