Dan Donovan

New House Bill Would Prohibit Lawmakers from Sleeping in Offices
Speaker Ryan, who sleeps in his office, won’t support bill, spokeswoman says

Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., introduced a bill Thursday to prohibit House members from sleeping in their congressional offices. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democratic Rep. Bennie Thompson of Mississippi introduced a bill Thursday to prohibit House members from sleeping overnight in their congressional offices as a way to save money.

The bill also would grant members a tax deduction for living expenses so they can better afford to make second homes in Washington during the work week while they're away from their home districts.

Donovan Aligns with Trump in First TV Ad
New York Republican expecting endorsement from Giuliani as he faces challenge from former Rep. Grimm

Rep. Dan Donovan, R-N.Y., aligned himself with President Donald Trump in his first television ad of the 2018 campaign. (Donovan for Congress via Spectrum News 1)

Rep. Dan Donovan, widely seen as the moderate in the primary against his predecessor, Michael Grimm, used his first television ad of the campaign to position himself as an ally in the House to President Donald Trump.

“I am working with Donald Trump to deport dangerous illegal aliens, build the wall, and end sanctuary cities,” Donovan, a New York Republican serving his first full term, says in the ad hitting the airwaves this week, Spectrum News 1 in New York reported.

Farm Bill Flux: Moderate Republicans Not Lining Up to Support
Freedom Caucus senses opportunity to leverage influence

Rep. Leonard Lance, R-N.J., is among several moderate Republicans opposed or leaning to opposition to the farm bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Several moderate House Republicans are firmly opposed to the farm bill or considering voting against it, providing leverage to conservatives who are trying to make their support contingent on securing a separate vote on an immigration bill.

New Jersey Reps. Frank LoBiondo, Christopher Smith, Leonard Lance and Rodney Frelinghuysen said they are “no” or leaning “no” on the farm bill.

Members Dismiss Need for ‘Taxpayer-Funded Dorm’ in D.C.
Donovan says he would rather keep sleeping in his office rather than use taxpayer dollars

Rep. Dan Donovan, R-N.Y., said he doesn’t support a proposal to fund a facility for affordable housing for members of Congress in Washington. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

New York Rep. Dan Donovan said he opposes legislation to provide members with cheap housing as an alternative to sleeping in his office.

The Republican congressman was one of several members who spoke to the New York Post about legislation being proposed by Democratic Rep. Bennie Thompson.

Democrats’ Poll Puts Grimm Up by Double Digits Over Donovan
Dems ‘desperate’ for Grimm because he has ‘zero shot of winning in November,’ incumbent says

Rep. Dan Donovan, R-N.Y., faces a primary challenge from his predecessor Michael Grimm. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A new Democratic poll of voters in the Republican primary for Rep. Dan Donovan’s seat shows challenger Michael Grimm up by 10 points, but the incumbent says that’s what they’d like you to believe.

Grimm led Donovan, 49 percent to 39 percent, among GOP voters in New York’s 11th District in the poll released by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, the House Democrats’ political arm, which hopes to flip the seat blue in November.

Grimm and Donovan Trade Barbs Over Fundraising
Incumbent launches website highlighting Grimm’s tax fraud conviction

Rep. Michael Grimm, R-N.Y., walks to the Capitol for a vote in 2014. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former New York Rep. Michael Grimm feuded with Rep. Dan Donovan over their fundraising numbers and who has more support in New York's 11th District.

Grimm, who is running against Donovan for his old seat, pointed out that of the $190,000 he raised in the first quarter, $100,000 of it was from district residents of Staten Island or South Brooklyn.

Michael Grimm Qualifies to Run Against Donovan, Setting Up Showdown
GOP primary race for Staten Island seat heating up, with accusations flying

Former Rep. Michael G. Grimm, R-N.Y., is challenging Rep. Dan Donovan, R-N.Y., in New York’s 11th District. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Rep. Michael G. Grimm has qualified for the Republican primary ballot for New York’s 11th District in hopes of wrestling back his old seat from incumbent GOP Rep. Dan Donovan.

Grimm, who served two terms in Congress before resigning in 2015, easily hurdled the 1,250-signature mark to file for the ballot Tuesday, the first day of eligibility to file in New York, gathering more than 3,000 signatures from people in the district.

Grimm Denies Being Behind Donovan Accusations
Disgraced former rep is challenging Donovan for his old seat

Former Rep. Michael Grimm is challenging his successor, Rep. Dan Donovan, in the Republican primary for a Staten Island district. (Tom Williams/Roll Call via Getty Images file photo)

Donovan Accused of Helping Partner’s Son Out of Drug Bust
Timothy O’Connell was arrested for heroin possession and sale

Rep. Dan Donovan, R-N.Y., allegedly helped his girlfriend’s son get cleared of drug charges. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

New York Republican Rep. Dan Donovan has been accused of using his position to help his partner’s son get out of a heroin-related arrest in 2015.

A complaint filed with the Office of Congressional Ethics last week said the congressman from Staten Island, a former district attorney, stepped in after Timothy O’Connell, then 19, and a friend were arrested for “criminal sale and possession of a controlled substance (heroin),” the New York Post reported.

Read the Bill or Get Out of Town Quickly? On Omnibus, Congress Chooses the Latter
‘This is a Great Dane-sized whiz down the leg of every taxpayer in America,’ Sen. Kennedy says

Sen. John Kennedy, R-La., compared the process of considering the omnibus appropriations package to a big dog urinating on taxpayers. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As Congress stares at a Friday deadline to fund the government, the reality that members will have scant time to actually read or process the $1.3 trillion fiscal 2018 omnibus before voting on it is starting to sink in.

The Wednesday night filing of the more than 2,200-page measure was the starting pistol that sent lawmakers into a mad dash against the government funding clock. They were given 52 hours.