David Scott

Ahead, the First Pure Party-Line Modern Tax Cut?
Bipartisanship has heralded tax bills for decades, but the Trump era is all about unique dynamics

If President Donald Trump is able to pul off a significant tax cut, it may well happen without any support from Democrats. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

The steady path toward today’s partisan polarization at the Capitol is etched in the history of tax bills over more than half a century.

If President Donald Trump is able to pull off his uphill drive to join most of his predecessors since World War II in securing a significant tax cut, it’s very possible he’ll do so exclusively with the votes of congressional Republicans.

Word on the Hill: Celebrity Chef in Hart
Bus tour and a hand chain for health care

Food Network chef Robert Irvine is bringing dessert to the Hill. (Gustavo Caballero/Getty Images file photo)

Desserts prepared by a celebrity chef are making their way to Capitol Hill this afternoon.

Chef Robert Irvine, best known for the Food Network’s “Dinner: Impossible” and “Worst Cooks in America” will join Hire Heroes USA and Walmart for an event to support veterans. He’s planning to man three dessert stations and serve as emcee.

Johnny Isakson May Have to Wait Until January for Victory
Georgia senator needs to win a majority of the vote to avoid runoff

Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., may be headed to a January runoff. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

No one expects Georgia Sen. Johnny Isakson to lose in November. The two-term Republican may just need to campaign for a few more months to hold onto his seat. 

Winning in the Peach State requires carrying more than 50 percent of the vote. And Republicans aren't sure he's going to get there next month. 

Ground Games Could Make Difference in Tight New Hampshire Race
Both parties think their operations will put them over the edge

Sen. Kelly Ayotte talks with former state Rep. David Scott at the Seacoast Republican Women's Chilifest in Stratham, N.H., on Saturday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

STRATHAM, N.H. — Sen. Kelly Ayotte has called for Rep. Frank C. Guinta to resign. And she's condemned some of the more controversial statements by Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.

But she now finds herself sandwiched between those two candidates on the GOP ballot. And that gives her even more of an incentive to run a campaign independent of other Republicans on the ticket. 

Tuesday Trivia: New Hampshire Primary
Rep. Guinta and Carol Shea-Porter could face off for 4th straight election

New Hampshire Rep. Frank Guinta, left, seen here with former state Rep. David Scott on Saturday, will face Democrat Carol Shea-Porter for the fourth straight election, if he wins his Tuesday primary. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Should Republican Rep. Frank C. Guinta win his New Hampshire primary Tuesday, he will face Democrat Carol Shea-Porter for the fourth consecutive general election, the most of any pair running this year. Which of these pairs will face each other for the third consecutive time in November?

A) Will Hurd and Pete Gallego

Once Unthinkable, Frank Guinta Could Survive His Primary
A year ago, New Hampshire congressman looked dead in the water

Rich Ashooh, left, took the stage at the Seacoast Republican Women's Chilifest in Stratham, N.H., just after primary opponent, Rep. Frank Guinta, second from right, had finished speaking. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

SCAMMAN FARM, STRATHAM, N.H. — Rep. Frank C. Guinta had barely finished speaking when the long-legged Rich Ashooh bounded onstage Saturday to address the party faithful at the 17th annual Seacoast Republican Women's Chilifest. 

"Tuesday is an important day," Ashooh said, standing on bales of hay, while in the garage behind him, 40 crocks of chili simmered. "But Wednesday is an even more important day," he said, a nod to the start of the general election campaign in the state's infamously swingy 1st District.

Democrats Think Georgia Is Starting to Lean Their Way
Will Clinton's rising fortunes in southern state help party's Senate candidate?

Hillary Clinton is starting to look competitive in Georgia. Her husband Bill was the last Democratic presidential candidate to carry the state. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As the Hillary Clinton campaign shows signs that it thinks Georgia is in play, the state's Democratic Senate candidate hopes that the increased interest in the Peach State could do for his campaign what Barack Obama's did for Kay Hagan's in North Carolina in 2008.

The Clinton campaign is expanding in Georgia, dispatching a campaign veteran to the state to coordinate grass-roots organizing and get out the vote efforts. 

Who Has Time for Legislating Anyway? | K Street Files

Jeb Hensarling, chairman of the House Financial Services panel, was in a rush to recess a lengthy markup so he and the other lawmakers could make it across the street to the Capitol for evening floor votes.  

But Rep. David Scott, D-Ga., pleaded for a few seconds to squeeze in his comments before the gavel.