Dina Titus

Iowa Democratic Rep. Abby Finkenauer endorses Joe Biden
Finkenauer is the first House member from Iowa to back a candidate in the presidential race

Rep. Abby Finkenauer, D-Iowa, endorsed former Vice President Joe Biden for the Democratic presidential nomination on Thursday.(Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Iowa Democratic Rep. Abby Finkenauer announced Thursday that she is endorsing former Vice President Joe Biden in the presidential primary, becoming the first Iowa Democratic House member to back a candidate in the race.

Joe Biden’s character, record, and commitment to rebuilding the backbone of the country — the middle class — is what Iowa and this country needs,” the first-term congresswoman said in a statement. “Across the country, and especially in Iowa, too many families are being left behind by our current president. It’s time we have leadership in the White House who believes in the value of not only uniting a divided Congress, but uniting our country through common sense, dignity, and respect.”

House Democrats weigh seniority and gender politics in replacing Cummings
Maloney in line to chair Oversight panel, but two men are also on secret ballot

Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., has seniority on the Oversight and Reform Committee but must defeat two challengers in a secret vote this week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats will confront longtime divisions over gender politics and how much weight to give seniority when they hold a secret vote Wednesday to select a permanent leader for a committee investigating possible ethical violations in President Donald Trump’s administration. 

Speaker Nancy Pelosi elevated the most senior member of the Oversight and Reform Committee, Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney of New York, to acting chairwoman after Chairman Elijah E. Cummings of Maryland died last month, per caucus rules.

Trump hotel lease is subject of latest House subpoena
Panel demands legal records, communications, profit statements for business

The Trump International Hotel on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C. in 2016. The Trump hotel has been subpoenaed documents related to the government's lease of the historic Old Post Office building in Washington to the president's hotel business. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Another House committee on Thursday issued a subpoena for an investigation of the Trump administration — this time demanding documents related to the federal government’s lease of the historic Old Post Office building in Washington to the president’s hotel business.

The subpoena from the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and signed by its chairman, Peter A. DeFazio, D-Ore., demands that the General Services Administration produce documents including legal records, communications between it and Trump and his children, as well as profit statements for the business, the Trump International Hotel.

Democrats tried to ‘blackmail’ casino owner to let employees unionize, conservative group claims
Lawmakers say ethics accusations by Foundation for Accountability and Civic Trust are baseless

Rep. Mark Pocan, D- Wisc., speaks with reporters as he leaves a House Democrats' caucus meeting in February. Pocan is one of 14 Democrats who wrote a letter to a casino mogul that a conservative ethics watchdog group says was part of an effort to coerce him to allow employees to unionize. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A conservative watchdog group asked the Office of Congressional Ethics on Thursday to review whether 14 Democratic lawmakers and one Republican inappropriately used their office to try to coerce a Las Vegas casino mogul into allowing his employees to unionize.

In May, Wisconsin Rep. Mark Pocan and 13 other Democrats wrote a letter to Frank Fertitta III, the CEO of the Las Vegas-based casino management company Red Rock Resorts Inc., urging him to “respect the rights of employees” at the company “to form a union and collectively bargain.”

The House passed 2 gun control bills, but Democrats aren’t in a rush to do more
Judiciary chairman expects to take up more gun legislation but not until after June

Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D- N.Y., says his panel will mark up more gun safety legislation but likely not until after June. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats took a victory lap this week as their new majority passed two priority gun control measures that the previous Republican majority had blocked for years, but they appear to be in no rush to pass more. 

“Yes, not immediately, but this session,” Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler told Roll Call on Thursday when asked if his panel would be marking up more legislation designed to prevent gun violence. Not immediately, the New York Democrat said, is likely “after June sometime.”

House Democrats’ gun agenda to start with where they might get GOP votes
Early bills will be more narrow in focus to avoid a pileup of go-nowhere legislation

Rep. Mike Thompson  is chairman of the House Democrats’ Gun Violence Prevention Task Force. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democratic supporters who helped sweep in a new class of lawmakers promising a gun law overhaul might have to wait longer than they’d like for that agenda to materialize in the form of bills.

While Democrats wrestled back the majority in the House, Republicans still control the Senate, and Donald Trump is still in the Oval Office.

Anti-legalization group releases first pot lobby tracker
Political donations to federal candidates mark growth in industry, shift in focus from states

Reps. Barbara Lee, D-Calif., and Earl Blumenauer, D-Ore., are among the biggest recipients of pot industry money to date, according to a new database maintained by an anti-legalization group. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A group opposed to the legalization of marijuana on Tuesday unveiled a tool to track industry donations to federal candidates. 

Smart Approaches to Marijuana, or SAM, is the first major opposition group to attempt to quantify the industry’s federal-level lobbying efforts,a sign of the growing profile of the legalization movement.

Newly Empowered House Democrats Vow to Act After Latest Mass Shooting
But Republican control in the Senate makes any legislation unlikely

Rep. Dina Titus, D-Nev., speaks during the news conference at the Capitol on in November 2017 to call on House Judiciary chairman Bob Goodlatte to hold a hearing and examine the use and legality of “bump stocks” after the mass shooting in her district in Las Vegas. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A mass shooting in California has again reignited the debate over guns in America and Congress.

A gunman opened fire at a bar hosting a “college night” in Thousand Oaks late Wednesday night, killing 12 people and injuring many more, according media reports. Among the dead was a sheriff’s sergeant who charged into the bar to confront the shooter.

Bernie Sanders Blasts Donald Trump for Weakness in ‘Taking on the Dictator of Saudi Arabia’
Vermont senator campaigning for Democrats in Nevada on Thursday

Sen. Bernie Sanders spoke at a Nevada Democrats' rally on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Bernie Sanders has added a direct assault on President Donald Trump over his handling of the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi to the top of his campaign stump speech.

“He’s a tough guy when it comes to presenting a budget that cuts nutrition programs for low-income pregnant women — really tough guy. But, ain’t so tough taking on the dictator of Saudi Arabia who has his dissidents murdered in cold blood,” Sanders said Thursday evening.

Donald Trump Once Wanted to Buy the FBI Headquarters, Now House Dems Are Asking Questions
New request sent to agency in charge for documents about potential conflicts

The front of the J. Edgar Hoover FBI Building on Pennsylvania Ave. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Key House Democrats pressed the head of the General Services Administration to provide more information Thursday about President Donald Trump’s role in the proposal to rebuild the FBI headquarters building on its current footprint on Pennsylvania Ave.

“As a direct result of President Trump’s clear conflict of interest on this matter, we are now requesting information and documents to determine whether the President is making decisions about the FBI headquarters building based on what is best for the country or what is best for his own financial bottom-line,” wrote the five House members, who are all ranking members of relevant committees or subcommittees.