E-Cigarettes

Senate panel approves Trump's FDA nominee
Senators ask questions about the FDA's plans for regulating e-cigarettes

Stephen Hahn, nominee to be commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, testifies during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee on Nov. 20. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A Senate panel approved President Donald Trump’s nominee to lead the Food and Drug Administration amid questions from both parties about the agency’s plans for regulating flavored e-cigarettes.

The Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee voted 18-5 to advance to the Senate floor the nomination of medical executive and doctor Stephen Hahn.

House panel to take up $10B vaping tax Wednesday
Measure would offset the cost of health care-related tax break proposals

Rep. Tom Suozzi, D-N.Y., cited statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showing 1,479 cases of lung illness and 33 deaths stemming from vaping and e-cigarette usage. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Legislation that would impose the first federal tax on vaping products is slated for a House Ways and Means Committee vote Wednesday, along with several other health care-related tax measures.

The bipartisan bill, from New York Reps. Tom Suozzi, a Democrat, and Republican Peter T. King, would tax “any nicotine which has been extracted, concentrated or synthesized” at the same rate cigarettes are currently taxed, or the equivalent of $50.33 per 1,810 milligrams of nicotine.

Bipartisan group urges FDA to go beyond vaping flavor ban
Senators call for more action to curb e-cigarettes

Last week, Sen. Richard Durbin, D-Ill., called on Sharpless to resign if the FDA did not restrict flavored e-cigarette sales, but Durbin said Thursday that Sharpless “responded to my letter in a positive way and I want to give him a chance to show that he’s serious.” (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senators from both parties emphasized to the Food and Drug Administration on Thursday that more should be done to curb youth vaping beyond the Trump administration’s decision a day earlier to ban e-cigarette flavors.

Acting FDA Commissioner Ned Sharpless briefed the senators in a morning meeting that the organizer, Minority Whip Richard J. Durbin, D-Illinois, described in positive terms. Last week, Durbin called on Sharpless to resign if the FDA did not restrict flavored e-cigarette sales, but Durbin said Thursday that Sharpless “responded to my letter in a positive way and I want to give him a chance to show that he’s serious.”

Trump’s FDA Takes on Tobacco
CQ on Congress Podcast, Episode 120

The FDA wants e-cigarette manufacturers to take steps to curb youth use or “face regulatory consequences.” (Matt Cardy/Getty Images file photo)

In an administration proud of its deregulatory approach, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb has defied the trend. He's proposed to mandate lower nicotine levels in cigarettes and suggested a willingness to crack down on electronic cigarette products popular with kids. Matthew L. Myers, president of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, and CQ health reporter Andrew Siddons assess the proposals and the likelihood Gottlieb will follow through.

 

E-Cigarette Industry Eyes Year-End Bill for Regulatory Rollback
Omnibus could better shield e-cigarette sales from new FDA regulations

Oklahoma Rep. Tom Cole said an omnibus bill would a better way of ensuring the sale of e-cigarette products are not affected by the new FDA regulations. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The effort to pass appropriations bills on time has all but collapsed because of controversial policy riders, but the e-cigarette industry and its allies view the likelihood of a catchall spending measure as a good thing.  

That’s because of a provision tucked into the House bill that funds the Food and Drug Administration (HR 5054), which would let current e-cigarette products remain on sale without pre-market approval from the FDA. Supporters of the language think it is more likely to survive in an omnibus than a stand-alone bill funding the FDA.  

E-Cigarette Regulations Could Stymie Small Shops
FDA issues long awaited rules

Promoters smoke electronic cigarettes during the Vape Fair in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. (MOHD RASFAN/AFP/Getty Images)

The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday issued long-awaited regulations that for the first time place e-cigarettes, vaporizers and other new tobacco products under federal oversight.  

Manufacturers can continue to sell the products for up to three years while they submit applications to the FDA. While all of the products will be subject to some kind of registration and pre-market approval, the rules appear to offer e-cigarette makers an opportunity to go through a less costly and time consuming review in line with the path almost all combustible tobacco products take. The final regulations will also require manufacturers to report ingredients and place health warnings on any packages or advertisements.  

Ep. 4: E-Cigarette Users Find Friends in GOP
The Big Story